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can't say i know much about this so will also be googling i can't post a url so have quite a bit below dunno why anyone would say "There are ...
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  1. #1
    Just Joined! jonyo's Avatar
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    Why Do Developers Contribute Code as Open Source?


    can't say i know much about this so will also be googling

    i can't post a url so have quite a bit below

    dunno why anyone would say "There are a lot of obvious reasons, why open source makes sense."

    I'd call that a HUGE assumption
    By Sean Michael Kerner | December 19, 2011

    From the 'Why We Fight' files:

    There are a lot of obvious reasons, why open source makes sense. This isn't a new topic, but every so often another 'new' survey emerges that reminds us of the core fundamentals.

    This time it's a new survey from the Outercurve Foundation -- which used to be known as the CodePlex Foundation - aka. the Microsoft sponsored open source foundation. But no, don't worry, no FUD mongering here, Outercurve is solidly in the open source camp.

    The study found that 90 percent of their survey respondents were using open source. The top reason why? 80 percent said it saves time and money.

    So why contribute?

    Apparently it's not just about scratching the 'itch' as I firmly believe. Rather 44 percent of respondents to the Outercurve study said they contributed their stuff as open source, "... to improve their careers and credibility."

    That's right open source is good for your career. But hey you knew that already right? (heck without open source, I wouldn't have a career let alone one that I could improve.)

    Beyond that developers are also of course contributing for the 'itch' as well.

    "We think it’s significant to note half of respondents contribute back to open source because they want to improve the projects they rely on,” said Paula Hunter, executive director of the Outercurve Foundation in a statement. "We’ve seen this positive energy and commitment to open source in a number of the foundation’s projects."

  2. #2
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Actually, in my experience (64 years of it now), most people like to believe they give quid pro quo for stuff they get for free. We get free software - Firefox, Chrome, VLC, Audacity, Kdenlive, NEdit, GCC, Emacs, Eclipse, Open Office / Libre Office, and so forth that lets us do our work efficiently and cheaply (free), so it is natural to want to give back to the community that has given so much to us. I was just reading on the Linux.com site today that Red Hat will become a billion $ company this year, yet ALL of their software is open source! I am writing this on a system running a Red Hat clone (Scientific Linux). In two weeks I will start work for Nokia, doing performance engineering mostly with Linux systems. My wife is a physicist and software engineer who works almost exclusively with Linux systems. To say that open source is important to my family would be a gross understatement!

    So, we like to give back when and what we can. It may be a simple bug fix, or just helping people on these forums. It's not a matter of "it's good for my resume". It's a matter of the fact that open source software is now ubiquitous in all of our lives, from our cell phones to our laptops to the GPS units in our cars that guide us though unknown locales.

    Ok. I'm ranting now... Sorry, but I'm a bit passionate about open source software!
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  3. #3
    Linux User sgosnell's Avatar
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    Part of being a human being is considering the common good to be more important than one's individual short-term advantage. This is unfortunately becoming less common, especially by those on the right end of the political spectrum and by corporations, but that has always been the primary way the human race has advanced.

    Rubberman, we're the same age. Old farts rule!

  4. #4
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sgosnell View Post
    Part of being a human being is considering the common good to be more important than one's individual short-term advantage. This is unfortunately becoming less common, especially by those on the right end of the political spectrum and by corporations, but that has always been the primary way the human race has advanced.

    Rubberman, we're the same age. Old farts rule!
    As the old saying goes, age and treachery trump youth and enthusiasm every time!
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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