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Originally Posted by Leeky I use it the same way I use my W7 PC mainly. I don't bother with the menu, I just click it and type what I ...
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  1. #21
    Linux Newbie SL6-A1000's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leeky View Post
    I use it the same way I use my W7 PC mainly. I don't bother with the menu, I just click it and type what I want. In that respect Gnome 3 works very well as well.
    While using the search field as a way of running apps and for getting your applications and probably general use is fine. However it doesn't really say much for the desktop, i mean most GUI's have a search engine; BUT that often isn't the first and foremost convenient way for using the GUI. You may as well run Command Promt/ Terminal or a DOS interface, that's practically the same thing, just without the eye-candy, it is just as efficient and probably more easier..

    Take for example Windows 7's GUI it has the search function in the start menu or you can place it on the taskbar, but often its quicker to just click the icon on the desktop or the shortcut in the start menu list to run the chosen program. Windows 8 "Metro Interface" is another excellent example of a user efficient way to design an interface that is most similar to GNOME 3's interface but it is functional. Even though some don't like the new 8 composite look between the old desktop and new Metro look, i actually love it for a PC. It is pure just Touch or mouse clicking and everything you are likely to use is right there on start-up or if newly installed appears on the new start menu (metro interface). Its got a few problems but the core functionality is there and considering its pre-beta, it is just awesome.

    I appreciate people have different opinions, (and I'm sure this doesn't apply to you) but reading the various negative comments online I've come to the conclusion that most people are just knocking it because someone else is, and its "cool" to join in. I'd be surprised if most people have even used it for more than 5 mins (if at all) before summarising it as useless.
    I understand a GUI is a personal choice but that defense is superfluous. It can't be proven or dis-proven and there are too many variables.

    I don't think that saying you use the search engine in GNOME 3 is as much of a positive functionality as you think it might be. It suggests you can't find any of the programs you want and would use but you like the new look. So in the blunt sense your conveying that its too confusing or hard to find anything so you use the search engine instead, because its easier then spending 5 or 10mins button clicking trying to find the program you want.

  2. #22
    Penguin of trust elija's Avatar
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    To be fair, I don't think there is a problem with a GUI using keyboard or mouse or a combination of both. It's when the combination is used badly (Gnome 3 / Unity) that there is a problem. With both of those my main gripe is that they are application centric rather than task centric. This means they get in the way of any usable work flow.

    To my eye, it looks like they have both been designed for iPad loving retards; just like the new BBC homepage. Dumb down your interfaces enough and soon only dummies will want to use them.
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  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by SL6-A1000 View Post
    While using the search field as a way of running apps and for getting your applications and probably general use is fine. However it doesn't really say much for the desktop, i mean most GUI's have a search engine; BUT that often isn't the first and foremost convenient way for using the GUI. You may as well run Command Promt/ Terminal or a DOS interface, that's practically the same thing, just without the eye-candy, it is just as efficient and probably more easier..
    I would agree with that for those that wouldn't be using that sort of functionality in general use. But whether its W7 or Gnome 3, typing is quicker than moving a mouse in my own experience.

    Even with that excluded, I still find the menu system pretty efficient. You can place your commonly used software on the left icon bar, and navigating a list isn't difficult.

    Quote Originally Posted by SL6-A1000 View Post
    Take for example Windows 7's GUI it has the search function in the start menu or you can place it on the taskbar, but often its quicker to just click the icon on the desktop or the shortcut in the start menu list to run the chosen program. Windows 8 "Metro Interface" is another excellent example of a user efficient way to design an interface that is most similar to GNOME 3's interface but it is functional. Even though some don't like the new 8 composite look between the old desktop and new Metro look, i actually love it for a PC. It is pure just Touch or mouse clicking and everything you are likely to use is right there on start-up or if newly installed appears on the new start menu (metro interface). Its got a few problems but the core functionality is there and considering its pre-beta, it is just awesome.
    Whether its faster to click an item on your desktop is very much dependant on you having them on there to begin with. If the item of software is not on the desktop you'll be resorting to typing or navigating the menu anyway. I prefer a clean desktop area, and put my most used applications in my taskbar. I do get your point though, it is faster to click an icon than it is to type the name of it and hit return.

    I'll reserve judgement until W8 is available as a retail release. There are aspects of it that I do find very impressive, but due to the current stage of build its not fair to draw a conclusion on how well it meshes with the original desktop functionality using the traditional start menu.

    Quote Originally Posted by SL6-A1000 View Post
    I don't think that saying you use the search engine in GNOME 3 is as much of a positive functionality as you think it might be. It suggests you can't find any of the programs you want and would use but you like the new look. So in the blunt sense your conveying that its too confusing or hard to find anything so you use the search engine instead, because its easier then spending 5 or 10mins button clicking trying to find the program you want.
    I know where they all are, and I know what categories they fit into. I also know the names of them and it is faster to type the name (usually the first couple of letters is more than enough to return the right result) and carry on about my business using my computer.

    If I didn't know what it all was it would make using the search box rather cumbersome in all fairness.

    It's just another method of using the GUI's available toolset. At the end of the day whether you navigate a menu, type an application name or click an icon, your achieving the same end goal (in respect to our discussion about opening applications) so I fail to see how I'm conveying any immaturity in regards to my knowledge of the OS or DE's in question.

  4. #24
    Linux Newbie SL6-A1000's Avatar
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    sorry leeky, i didn't mean you as in you the user i meant the search engine functionality. I wasn't trying to suggest your immaturity as a user on desktops and what not. But i see how what i said was taken that way.

    I don't think the search engine function is a bad way to run a desktop. But for gnome 3, i don't feel users have much alternative. Because all the programs are hidden behind 2 to 3 sub-menus. So for a user who prefers the mouse its very inefficient.

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