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1.Is it true that companies that use Linux use RPM based distros of Linux like Redhat, Fedora, and open-SUSE? 2.If they do why do they?(are not Debian packages easier to ...
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  1. #1
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    10 Questions to get of my chest once and for all!


    1.Is it true that companies that use Linux use RPM based distros of Linux like Redhat, Fedora, and open-SUSE?

    2.If they do why do they?(are not Debian packages easier to come across)

    3. Am I better off learning an RPM based distro rather than a Debian based distro if I might consider a job relative to Linux in the future?

    4.Are not most companies that develop software for Linux more likely to package that software into a Debian file compared to an RPM file?

    5.If so then why chose RPM over Debian?


    6.Does using different versions of Linux require you to know different sets of terminal commands? (For example sudo apt-get install "something" works in Ubuntu and Mint but what do you type in open-SUSE).

    7.Is it fine to use Gnome 3 in open-SUSE if I keep hearing that its native desktop environment is KDE?

    8.Can Linux Mint be ran in purely gnome 3 as opposed to the gnome2/3 hybrid that they are using?

    9.Is Fedora less stable than open-SUSE?

    10. What is the best RPM based disto and best Debian based distro with regards to awesome software management, great selection of software and ease of use?

  2. #2
    Super Moderator Roxoff's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DEdesigns57 View Post
    1.Is it true that companies that use Linux use RPM based distros of Linux like Redhat, Fedora, and open-SUSE?
    Usually a company looks for different things for its operating systems than the enthusiast. The reason RPM based distributions such as RedHat and SuSE are popular to business is that support packages are available for these directly from the distribution producer.

    Quote Originally Posted by DEdesigns57 View Post
    2.If they do why do they?(are not Debian packages easier to come across)
    Quite often someone using a server OS in a business may be interested in a particular version of one package, but the rest of the system they want to be rock solid and stable. There may be packages available for Debian that are outside of the main repositories, but installing from 3rd party sources can reduce the stability of your server.

    Quote Originally Posted by DEdesigns57 View Post
    3. Am I better off learning an RPM based distro rather than a Debian based distro if I might consider a job relative to Linux in the future?
    There is more in common than there is different between the distributions. Your skills would be readily transferable to other distributions with little fuss.

    Quote Originally Posted by DEdesigns57 View Post
    4.Are not most companies that develop software for Linux more likely to package that software into a Debian file compared to an RPM file?
    Companies producing paid-for product for business should be packaging their product for the top business distributions, i.e. RedHat, Debian and SuSE Enterprise - if they don't then they're cutting off a chunk of their potential market.

    Quote Originally Posted by DEdesigns57 View Post
    5.If so then why chose RPM over Debian?
    For the paid-for support. Support contracts are king in the commercial world. If it all goes wrong (i.e. when their junior IT guy breaks stuff) they want to know that there's someone at the end of a phone that can fix it and have things working again quickly.

    Quote Originally Posted by DEdesigns57 View Post
    6.Does using different versions of Linux require you to know different sets of terminal commands? (For example sudo apt-get install "something" works in Ubuntu and Mint but what do you type in open-SUSE).
    In general, no. RPM-based distros generally use yum and the Debian based disros use apt. It is possible to use apt for RedHat based systems too, but the capabilities of both are quite similar these days, it's one of the few areas where you'd need to spend half an hour familiarising yourself with new package manager tools.

    Quote Originally Posted by DEdesigns57 View Post
    7.Is it fine to use Gnome 3 in open-SUSE if I keep hearing that its native desktop environment is KDE?
    SuSE has, I believe, several DE's available in its software repositories - KDE is just the default one.

    Quote Originally Posted by DEdesigns57 View Post
    8.Can Linux Mint be ran in purely gnome 3 as opposed to the gnome2/3 hybrid that they are using?
    I'm not that familiar with Mint, but I know that there is no such thing as a Gnome 2/3 hybrid - if it's using Gnome 3, then Gnome 2 is not available. Gnome 3 has a fallback mode that is in some ways similar to Gnome 2, and Mint has some custom extensions to Gnome 3.

    Quote Originally Posted by DEdesigns57 View Post
    9.Is Fedora less stable than open-SUSE?
    Stability is governed by many factors - Fedora, in theory, should be less stable than Open SuSE, the intention with Fedora is to include the very latest versions of packages, to keep it at the bleeding edge of the Linux world. But I'm typing this on my Eee PC using Fedora 16 and nothing's broken yet... It all depends on what hardware is in your system and how you configure things.

    Quote Originally Posted by DEdesigns57 View Post
    10. What is the best RPM based disto and best Debian based distro with regards to awesome software management, great selection of software and ease of use?
    'Best' is always a subjective term. Your 'best' distribution may not be the best one for your neighbour. If you're desperate for awesome package management, then Debian might be best for you. If you want a support contract, then perhaps RedHat or SuSE would be better suited.
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  3. #3
    Penguin of trust elija's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roxoff View Post
    UStability is governed by many factors - Fedora, in theory, should be less stable than Open SuSE, the intention with Fedora is to include the very latest versions of packages, to keep it at the bleeding edge of the Linux world. But I'm typing this on my Eee PC using Fedora 16 and nothing's broken yet... It all depends on what hardware is in your system and how you configure things.
    And what you mean by stability. If you are running Debian (stable) or RHEL / CentOS / Scientific then the software versions are not going to change until the next major release. Updates are usually bug and security fixes only. For the enterprise world that is just as important as stability meaning not falling over.
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    for answer #1: what do you mean by "support packages"?
    for answer #2: are there not 3rd party RPM packages as well?
    for answer #5: are you saying that RPM based distros like Red-hat/SUSE provide technical support and that Debian based distos do not?

  5. #5
    Penguin of trust elija's Avatar
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    1. You can phone up a help desk and talk to someone or email them for help. Additionally, updates are only available to those with a support contract.

    2. Yep. And the same applies.

    3. No. Some companies such as Red Hat, Novell (still?) and Canonical do provide support. Canonical, obviously support a .deb based distro.
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  6. #6
    Linux Guru Cabhan's Avatar
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    For home use, package management tends to be one of the most important aspects of a distribution.

    For business use, this is not true. Businesses tend to test particular versions of things, and use only that version. Eventually, when it's far enough out of date, they will test a different version and use that. Businesses gravitate towards distributions that provide support contracts, which guarantees that someone will help if a problem occurs (as opposed to a home user, who comes to LinuxForums.org and asks random people on the Internet ).

    The main difference between various distributions (from an enterprise perspective) is not the commands, but the architecture. What sort of init process do they use? Do they custom patch the kernel? How frequently do they release? Things like this.

    If you are planning to use Linux at a job, it does not matter at all what distro you run at home. If you are planning to be a Linux system administrator, it may matter a bit, but the difference is the architecture, not the type of package that they use.

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