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wow so much info cant wait to know about it all im interested in swapping my destros. am i right in thinking destro is like desktop theme how it all ...
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  1. #11
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    wow so much info cant wait to know about it all im interested in swapping my destros. am i right in thinking destro is like desktop theme how it all looks and acts

  2. #12
    Linux Guru jmadero's Avatar
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    I'd say yes it is how it looks and acts, no it is not like a theme. A theme is just how it looks and each distro comes with a desktop environment which then you can theme however you wish. The major desktop environments are Gnome, KDE, E17, XFDE, Unity and LXDE, these really will control how things behave, then you have distros that come with them, these will differ based on what package manager (how you install software) and then what packages are pre-installed. Ubuntu is well known because it is "bloated" (has a bit of something for everyone, comes preinstalled with a ton of drivers to handle more hardware), this can be good and bad as it usually "just works" but can be slower. For theming (once you choose a Distro and Desktop Environment), I recommend going to one of the *-look.org sites (gnome-look, kde-loop, e17-look, etc..), they have a ton of themes constantly being updated. The wiki has a list of a lot of the distros:

    Comparison of Linux distributions - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


    I personally have chosen Bodhi recently, so far, 95% of what I like to do works well and it's fast as hell (9 seconds to get out of sleep and fully on, I rarely shut down so this works great for me)
    Bodhi 1.3 & Bodhi 1.4 using E17
    Dell Studio 17, Intel Graphics card, 4 gigs of RAM, E17

    "The beauty in life can only be found by moving past the materialism which defines human nature and into the higher realm of thought and knowledge"

  3. #13
    Linux Guru jmadero's Avatar
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    Your best bet is to just pick one and install it. Look at the list, are you currently using a distro? For newer users Ubuntu, Fedora and OpenSuse are usually the safest bets, I'd say try Ubuntu or Kubuntu or any of the other versions including if you want Mint which I've been told is solid (never used it myself)
    Bodhi 1.3 & Bodhi 1.4 using E17
    Dell Studio 17, Intel Graphics card, 4 gigs of RAM, E17

    "The beauty in life can only be found by moving past the materialism which defines human nature and into the higher realm of thought and knowledge"

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  5. #14
    Administrator jayd512's Avatar
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    am i right in thinking the destro s like the desktop theme and now it all workes and the lay out etc.
    Not quite...
    A dstro is short for distribution, which is the whole bundle of software. The included drivers, applications and startup scripts are what make the difference between, for example, Mint and Ubuntu.

    When you say desktop theme, I believe you might be thinking about the Desktop Environment. That would be Gnome, KDE, Xfce, etc.
    See here for some information and screenshots: Window Managers for X
    Last edited by jayd512; 01-13-2012 at 10:07 PM. Reason: forgot quote
    Jay

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  6. #15
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    so how do i actually go about changing the destros and themes! as mean as your the one advising me ill have a go at bodhi how do i actually get it!

  7. #16
    Linux Guru jmadero's Avatar
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    I would not recommend Bodhi for a new user as it doesn't have some of the tools that are good for new users (one example is pulseaudio which is a bit easier to configure than ALSA). I'd recommend getting Ubuntu from here:

    Homepage | Ubuntu

    and installing it from a flash drive using this technique:

    Howto: Create LiveUSBs from Windows using a GUI (UNetbootin) - Ubuntu Forums
    Bodhi 1.3 & Bodhi 1.4 using E17
    Dell Studio 17, Intel Graphics card, 4 gigs of RAM, E17

    "The beauty in life can only be found by moving past the materialism which defines human nature and into the higher realm of thought and knowledge"

  8. #17
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    so fedora is my OS and ubuntu will be the destro is that right

  9. #18
    Administrator jayd512's Avatar
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    Fedora is a Linux distribution. So that is that distro.
    Ubuntu is a different distribution of Linux, so is a different distro.
    Red Hat & Debian are different distributions. Different distros.

    A distribution is a distributed version.
    Fedora is a version of Linux. Fedora is a distro.

    Does that help?
    Jay

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  10. #19
    Linux Guru jmadero's Avatar
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    no ubuntu replaces fedora
    Bodhi 1.3 & Bodhi 1.4 using E17
    Dell Studio 17, Intel Graphics card, 4 gigs of RAM, E17

    "The beauty in life can only be found by moving past the materialism which defines human nature and into the higher realm of thought and knowledge"

  11. #20
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    I know it is confusing to a n00b, b/c with Windows, there are basically no options.

    Look at it like this, the Linux Operating System is more specifically the Linux kernel and the GNU utilities (userland programs). The Linux kernel is software that sits between you and your hardware and performs low-level functions like load drivers to allow your hardware to be manipulated. The GNU utilities are the programs and commands that you run that allow you utilize the kernel and your hardware (think of things like "ls" and "cp" and "pwd" and the "shell"). All versions of Linux (a.k.a. "distributions") have these things in common.

    On top of that, there can be a graphical component, most commonly provided by the Xorg project. This is a display server that allows graphical applications to run (e.g., "Firefox" or "Adobe Reader"). But Xorg alone is not enough - you need a display manager. This is a suite of utilities and applications that provide a rich (or not so rich) and cohesive desktop environment: think of your desktop, wallpaper, icons, start menu programs, window decorations and themes, and you get the idea. Examples of display managers have already been given: the two biggest are Gnome and KDE, they've been around for ages.

    So you have the Linux kernel, you have userland utilities, you have X, and now you have display managers. There are two more important components that I think should be considered core parts of a Linux distribution:

    1. Server versus Workstation/Desktop

    2. Software package management

    The Linux server is typically the multi-processor, RAM-heavy, mass-storage capacity workhorse that runs various daemons and services, operates in a headless environment (no X/Display), and sits in a rack in some cold room behind a locked door.

    By contrast, the Workstation or Desktop is typically a less powerful system meant for user interaction, and so will have a graphical display of some sort, and various applications that allow daily work to get done, which usually includes some sort of communications with servers. They can be great fun to customize, to which many ex-Windows users can attest.

    Software package management simply signifies how software is installed, configured, and maintained on a Linux system. There are several versions of package managers out there, the two biggest being yum (and rpm) which works with software packaged as a .RPM file, and apt-get (and dpkg) which works with software packaged as a .DEB archive.

    Now is where distributions come into play. A distribution is basically the conceptualization of how Linux Operating System should behave, look, work, etc., by combining all of the above components together. Some companies have worked VERY hard to make their Linux products extremely stable, reliable, and/or easy to use. Many Linux distributions will have both a server and a workstation/desktop version. To reiterate, a couple of the biggest distributions are the RPM-based Red Hat Enterprise Linux (and its cousin, Fedora) and the DEB-based Debian (and its offspring, Ubuntu).

    To add to the confusion, many distros try to make multiple display mangers available, allowing the user the freedom to choose. This is where I think you are now. So basically, you could be running the Fedora distro and KDE display manager, Fedora and Gnome, or Ubuntu and Gnome, or Mint (distro) and Unity (dm), or Arch (distro) and KDE, etc., etc.

    To make it even more confusing, new distros are being created all the time. It is the beauty and curse of Linux: the freedom to do anything you want allows great creativity but at the price of making it challenging for everyone to be on the same page.

    Still, Linux beats the hell out of the alternatives...
    elija and Roxoff like this.

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