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Maybe the release notes should include what drugs make the new features seem cool....
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  1. #21
    Linux Engineer MASONTX's Avatar
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    Maybe the release notes should include what drugs make the new features seem cool.
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  2. #22
    Administrator jayd512's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MASONTX View Post
    Maybe the release notes should include what drugs make the new features seem cool.
    I know the 'Like' button...
    We need a 'Really Like' button...
    Jay

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  3. #23
    Linux Engineer hazel's Avatar
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    From what I've read of HUD, it sounds very like the "Run Everything" box in E17. You type a few letters into a text box and icons for applications and files that match appear below for a one-click launch.

    I don't use it in Slackbody because the icon bar and the favorites menu both strike me as simpler to use.

    Of course bash has been doing this for years; it's called command completion. Funny that GUIs are now using something similar!
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  5. #24
    Penguin of trust elija's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hazel View Post
    From what I've read of HUD, it sounds very like the "Run Everything" box in E17. You type a few letters into a text box and icons for applications and files that match appear below for a one-click launch.
    That's Dash which I believe is based on Gnome Do. As I understand HUD, it does the same and it also handles application menus. You no longer have to remember if the applications settings are Edit -> Settings -> Some other sub menu or Tools -> Preferences -> Woteva; just type in settings and it will find it for you. Sounds like a brilliant idea to me but and yes there is a but....

    It seems Unity is still buggy as Hell

    A few random examples found over the past few days:

    1. Programs randomly not starting when attempting to run them using dash
    2. Minimised programs not restoring when clicking their icon in the launcher bar again randomly.
    3. The top menu bar does not integrate with all applications. It should be consistent.

    And a bit more personal

    4. Having set an Emerald theme it is terrible that maximising a window replaces the decorations that I have chosen with the awful ones that come with Unity.
    5. It is even more unforgivable that de-maximising a window refuses to redraw the Decoration that I have chosen.


    The question then becomes will HUD be of better quality than vision? The other question is do I keep trying to get used to it?
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  6. #25
    oz
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    Quote Originally Posted by elija View Post
    The other question is do I keep trying to get used to it?
    That's the problem with the huge changes that the devs keep throwing at everyone lately... Gnome3, GRUB2, KDE4, Unity, and now HUD. Sure, they all take some time to grow into, but I've been trying to get used to KDE4 since it was released over 4 years ago and still don't like it as much as KDE3, so I'm beginning to wonder just how much time it takes to adjust to these new things that are supposed to be so great?
    oz

  7. #26
    Administrator jayd512's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by elija View Post
    The other question is do I keep trying to get used to it?
    My question is... Should you have to keep trying to 'get used to it'?
    The trying part is my complaint.
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  8. #27
    Penguin of trust elija's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by oz View Post
    That's the problem with the huge changes that the devs keep throwing at everyone lately... Gnome3, GRUB2, KDE4, Unity, and now HUD. Sure, they all take some time to grow into, but I've been trying to get used to KDE4 since it was released over 4 years ago and still don't like it as much as KDE3, so I'm beginning to wonder just how much time it takes to adjust to these new things that are supposed to be so great?
    I'm finding harder to adjust to all the changes than I did a few years ago but then it is definitely accelerating.

    Quote Originally Posted by jayd512 View Post
    My question is... Should you have to keep trying to 'get used to it'?
    The trying part is my complaint.
    There's a lot in Unity that I like and when I compare it to Unity from 11.04, it is so much better that a tiny part of me wants to hang on until 12.04 to see what the LTS does for it. It's still way too buggy though; I have just had some application Windows disappear from the desktop and I don't know if I can put up with all of that until then.

    It is different, so you have to make an effort to work it's way and that's where the trying comes in. I think I'll try an experiment over the next couple of days and see if I can get Gnome Do or something similar installed on XFCE.

    And now that's Synaptic not starting. *sigh*
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  9. #28
    Just Joined! Randicus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by elija View Post
    That's Dash which I believe is based on Gnome Do. As I understand HUD, it does the same and it also handles application menus. You no longer have to remember if the applications settings are Edit -> Settings -> Some other sub menu or Tools -> Preferences -> Woteva; just type in settings and it will find it for you.
    That is the dumbing down of DEs so many people are complaining about. Honestly, how difficult is it to remember where applications are? Applications that change settings are in Configuration, Preferences or what ever a particular DE calls it. User applications are in Applications (go figure). Gnome2's three drop drown expanding menus was really good. Unfortunately, developers thought an easy menu system of Application, Places and Administration is too difficult for all us idiots to remember. We need the menu to think for us.
    The right-click menus used with Openbox, Fluxbox and XFCE are also quite good. It only takes a few hours to get completely used to them. If it takes months or years to get "used to" a DE, it is obviously flawed. Computers, including the DE, are governed by the same fact of reality.

    Simple and functional is better than complex and unwieldy.
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  10. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by hazel View Post
    You type a few letters into a text box and icons for applications and files that match appear below for a one-click launch.
    Which is an interface designed for a PC which does not have a mouse, but relies on a touch screen and/or keyboard. In short: it's for tablets / touch screens and the like.

    My take on this is simple - the end user should not have to "make do", put up with, accommodate or try to get used to a system which is not even designed for a normal desktop/laptop PC.

    Gnome 3 and Unity are definitely heading in the tablet direction - KDE, as far as I can tell, is not. There are many things I dislike about KDE, but it doesn't deserve half of the bad press it gets (though it probably deserves the other half). The one thing I will say in it's defence is that it does not seem to have been designed around touch screen systems.

    The Unity and gnome devs have obviously been popping pills as all they can think about at the moment is tablets...

  11. #30
    Penguin of trust elija's Avatar
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    Actually, it could work very well even on a PC with a mouse.

    Mice cause worse RSI than keyboards
    No longer having to move your hands away from the keyboard when working means less interruptions to your workflow.

    I have found that I quite like that; despite being resistant for a long time. The problems I have encountered that have made decide to "run away! run away!" are the buggy and flawed implentations of the concept.
    "I used to be with it, then they changed what it was.
    Now what was it isn't it, and what is it is weird and scary to me.
    It'll happen to you too."

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