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Originally Posted by Randicus One problem is that Shuttleworth wants to be an innovator, but instead of his innovation being developed by a good distribution, he is trying to innovate ...
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  1. #31
    Linux Newbie SL6-A1000's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Randicus View Post
    One problem is that Shuttleworth wants to be an innovator, but instead of his innovation being developed by a good distribution, he is trying to innovate using a garbage system like Ubuntu. If his ideas have any merit, they will only work if a quality distribution like Debian, Slackware or Red Hat takes up his ideas and modify them. Otherwise, it will only be bad Ubuntu continuing its downward spiral.
    Why do i get the constant feeling your referring to Mac OS X and Steve Jobs more than anything?

    Your forgetting though that Shuttleworth is also part of Debian i believe he actually runs both, and i remember reading somewhere that he said that if Debian is to remain the stable and reliable distro that everyone loves. Ubuntu was created as the "radical child" in essence to push new development in the linux community. Wish i could find that article!

    Quote Originally Posted by elija View Post
    Due to a nasty bout of Asthma, my doctor has put me on a large dose of steroid tablets. They have some interesting side effects. For example last night, I found myself half way through installing Ubuntu 11.10 with Unity on my main desktop! I genuinely don't remember starting the process. On a fairly chunky machine (Quad core i5, 16GB RAM, 1GB Nvida Graphics) it's very smooth and actually quite usable.

    It will be interesting to see if my opinion changes back when the medication wears off in a few more days! And if it does, I may have shed some light on the design desicions taken by the Gnome 3 and Unity teams *_*
    Well if anything thats any interesting choice of drugs to take when your developing, why steroids? :S are they trying to maintain their physique while being slobs at a desk. Why not choose coc, e or something that actually provides hallucinations lol.

    Although it does make me concerned that they may just bring out a new desktop that's just a jumble of nothingness. You know a desktop that when you login, it just restarts your computer and says "You shall not pass!" with a pic of Ganondalf (or even the video clip). Or worse yet an encrypted desktop. There motto could be "ultimate security! Not even the user can crack"

    Quote Originally Posted by oz View Post
    That's the problem with the huge changes that the devs keep throwing at everyone lately... Gnome3, GRUB2, KDE4, Unity, and now HUD. Sure, they all take some time to grow into, but I've been trying to get used to KDE4 since it was released over 4 years ago and still don't like it as much as KDE3, so I'm beginning to wonder just how much time it takes to adjust to these new things that are supposed to be so great?
    I disagree about GRUB 2 while i love legacy GRUB, GRUB 2 is a clear improvement of features and usabilty. It was clear the developers who did GRUB2 really thought about how to make it better without losing the usability that legacy GRUB had.

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by SL6-A1000 View Post
    I disagree about GRUB 2 while i love legacy GRUB, GRUB 2 is a clear improvement of features and usabilty. It was clear the developers who did GRUB2 really thought about how to make it better without losing the usability that legacy GRUB had.
    Oh, I personally get along just fine with GRUB2, but check around and you'll find plenty of users who don't. For me, GRUB has been nothing but successful regardless of the version used.
    oz

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    Just Joined! Randicus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SL6-A1000 View Post
    Why do i get the constant feeling your referring to Mac OS X and Steve Jobs more than anything?

    Your forgetting though that Shuttleworth is also part of Debian i believe he actually runs both, and i remember reading somewhere that he said that if Debian is to remain the stable and reliable distro that everyone loves. Ubuntu was created as the "radical child" in essence to push new development in the linux community. Wish i could find that article!
    1) Shuttleworth does have delusions of grandeur.
    2) Shuttleworth runs Debian.? That is news to me.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SL6-A1000 View Post
    Your forgetting though that Shuttleworth is also part of Debian
    Was... back in the 90's I believe. He is not part of Debian now. If you have some new information on this, then please present some reliable sources.

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    Quote Originally Posted by oz View Post
    Oh, I personally get along just fine with GRUB2, but check around and you'll find plenty of users who don't. For me, GRUB has been nothing but successful regardless of the version used.
    Well, I didn't like GRUB and I loathed GRUB2. Why put a big complex scripting language into a bootloader? For me, one of the most important things is to know how my system works; that was why I fell in love with Linux. I don't have any idea how GRUB works, so I prefer to use LILO which is conceptually simple.

    All these new things not only make Linux more like the proprietary OS's; they also make it almost impossible to understand what is going on under the hood, and that's a huge step backwards.
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    Quote Originally Posted by hazel View Post
    Well, I didn't like GRUB and I loathed GRUB2. Why put a big complex scripting language into a bootloader? For me, one of the most important things is to know how my system works; that was why I fell in love with Linux. I don't have any idea how GRUB works, so I prefer to use LILO which is conceptually simple.

    All these new things not only make Linux more like the proprietary OS's; they also make it almost impossible to understand what is going on under the hood, and that's a huge step backwards.
    LILO always worked well for me, too... except for those times where I'd forget to run the lilo command after upgrading it!

    I agree that all the complexity being added to Linux recently is making things more difficult, and in the end I've not noticed that I'm able to get any more work done than before. All the eye-candy gadgets being added are a waste for me as well, hence my Openbox (window manager only) on Arch setup being my favorite machine to run and use.
    oz

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    Quote Originally Posted by elija View Post
    Actually, it could work very well even on a PC with a mouse.

    Mice cause worse RSI than keyboards
    ...for gamers. In fact for normal PC usage, the keyboard is the worst offender. Which is why a lot of research has gone into making keyboards more ergonomic over the years.

    Quote Originally Posted by elija View Post
    No longer having to move your hands away from the keyboard when working means less interruptions to your workflow.
    I agree with this but it depends on what kind of work you're doing. For example if you're using a program like inkscape, gimp or if you're doing 3D modelling, or any kind of "desktop publishing" this HUD system is less useful as you whould still be jumping back and forth from the keyboard to the mouse. In those cases right click context menus and "dockers" are more useful.

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    Just Joined! Randicus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SL6-A1000 View Post
    Your forgetting though that Shuttleworth is also part of Debian i believe he actually runs both ...
    Just to set the record straight, so this does not become an ugly rumour, the person currently at the helm of Debian is Stefano Zacchiroli. I forget the name of the last leader, but it is not Shuttleworth.
    The notion that Shuttleworth is involved with Debian, let lone running it , is probably a vile rumour started by an Ubuntuphile who thinks Debian is part of Ubuntu, because Ubuntu uses Debian software.

  9. #39
    Penguin of trust elija's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by caravel View Post
    ...for gamers. In fact for normal PC usage, the keyboard is the worst offender. Which is why a lot of research has gone into making keyboards more ergonomic over the years.
    I find mice far more uncomfortable in protracted use although I do have an ergonomic keyboard.

    Quote Originally Posted by caravel View Post
    I agree with this but it depends on what kind of work you're doing. For example if you're using a program like inkscape, gimp or if you're doing 3D modelling, or any kind of "desktop publishing" this HUD system is less useful as you whould still be jumping back and forth from the keyboard to the mouse. In those cases right click context menus and "dockers" are more useful.
    The best tool for the best job obviously. I'm a coder but am forced to use the mouse to carry out certain actions when it would be far easier and efficient to have a keyboard alternative. I've installed Synapse which is no where as slick as Dash but integrates with Zeitgeist gives it a chance of becoming slicker over time.

    Quote Originally Posted by Randicus View Post
    Just to set the record straight, so this does not become an ugly rumour, the person currently at the helm of Debian is Stefano Zacchiroli. I forget the name of the last leader, but it is not Shuttleworth.
    The notion that Shuttleworth is involved with Debian, let lone running it , is probably a vile rumour started by an Ubuntuphile who thinks Debian is part of Ubuntu, because Ubuntu uses Debian software.
    Running as in installed on his computer maybe?
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    Quote Originally Posted by elija View Post
    Running as in installed on his computer maybe?
    Yes I interpreted that as "running on his PC" rather than "running the show" as well. Though to pretend there is no Canonical Ltd influence in Debian would be naive. Quite a few Debian devs are also 'buntu devs and often Canonical employees.

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