Find the answer to your Linux question:
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13
Just to introduce myself. I'm a DBA. I've been working in computer fields since around '84. I actually do use Linux at work but, I'm not a system administrator. At ...
Enjoy an ad free experience by logging in. Not a member yet? Register.
  1. #1
    Just Joined! MickeyRat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    9

    Hello There!


    Just to introduce myself. I'm a DBA. I've been working in computer fields since around '84.

    I actually do use Linux at work but, I'm not a system administrator. At home I've been using it since around 2006. I'd actually tried it a few times in the late '90s and early 2000s. Back then dependency hell always made me give up. I'm glad to see that's been conquered.

    I've been using Ubuntu and Mint mostly. Yeah, I know that's for wimps but, I'll probably confine my posting here to what I believe are questions that go deeper than just the distro. You can let me know when I'm wrong.

    I'm not afraid of the command line or to edit a config file, if I know where it is and have a pretty good idea what it's supposed to do. I have compiled Linux programs successfully but, I try to avoid it. There are a million options that I don't know but, I can use a find command to locate a file in a directory tree. That should give you some idea where I am technically.

    I look forward to learning on this forum.

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Administrator MikeTbob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    7,864
    Hello and Welcome to the forums.
    I do not respond to private messages asking for Linux help, Please keep it on the forums only.
    All new users please read this.** Forum FAQS. ** Adopt an unanswered post.

    I'd rather be lost at the lake than found at home.

  3. #3
    Linux Guru jmadero's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    California
    Posts
    1,998
    Welcome to the forums. No distro is for wimps I used Ubuntu religiously until recently when Unity became such an issue. I rarely use command line for editing anything & agreed, compiling from source is usually not necessary these days (although we all do it from time to time for fun ) Glad to see our community continuing to expand
    Bodhi 1.3 & Bodhi 1.4 using E17
    Dell Studio 17, Intel Graphics card, 4 gigs of RAM, E17

    "The beauty in life can only be found by moving past the materialism which defines human nature and into the higher realm of thought and knowledge"

  4. #4
    Just Joined! MickeyRat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    9
    Quote Originally Posted by jmadero View Post
    Welcome to the forums. No distro is for wimps I used Ubuntu religiously until recently when Unity became such an issue. I rarely use command line for editing anything & agreed, compiling from source is usually not necessary these days (although we all do it from time to time for fun ) Glad to see our community continuing to expand
    Well I don't usually have anything but a command line at work. So, I'm pretty used to it. It really is easier for some things, if it's what you're used to.

    I have to laugh at the unity remark. My wife's laptop is still set up with Ubuntu 10.04. I moved mine onto 11.10 for a couple months and never upgraded hers. I gave unity an honest try but, now I'm on Mint.

  5. #5
    Linux Guru jmadero's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    California
    Posts
    1,998
    Yeah I gave Unity a year, I actually liked some aspects of it but it was so bad with what Linux is usually so good at (changing lots of things very frequently, I go between different configs often and Unity just goes insane when I run my scripts).

    As for Mint, I've heard good things but haven't tried it. Some say Mint will be the Ubuntu killer -- I personally think Ubuntu still has a niche (a solid one) and continues to push the envelope with innovations.

    Lastly, if you're interesting in trying another Ubuntu forked distro but probably much faster than Mint, I'd suggest Bodhi. It's Ubuntu +E17, works great for me and my wife recently switched over to it and has no complaints.
    Bodhi 1.3 & Bodhi 1.4 using E17
    Dell Studio 17, Intel Graphics card, 4 gigs of RAM, E17

    "The beauty in life can only be found by moving past the materialism which defines human nature and into the higher realm of thought and knowledge"

  6. #6
    Just Joined! MickeyRat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    9
    Quote Originally Posted by jmadero View Post
    As for Mint, I've heard good things but haven't tried it. Some say Mint will be the Ubuntu killer -- I personally think Ubuntu still has a niche (a solid one) and continues to push the envelope with innovations.

    Lastly, if you're interesting in trying another Ubuntu forked distro but probably much faster than Mint, I'd suggest Bodhi. It's Ubuntu +E17, works great for me and my wife recently switched over to it and has no complaints.
    Personally, I suspect Mint is doing well because they are still listening to their user base. From what I can tell, the Ubuntu guys have gotten less responsive over time. That doesn't really reflect badly on them. It's just the way things go as an organization grows. The thing is that anyone using Linux has options and some are exercising them. I will say that Mint has tried to ease the transition to gnome 3 more than Ubuntu has.

    I might give Bodhi a try especially if I can get some answers on my wireless problem. Apparently I have get my post count to 15 before I can link to that. I don't like to change things around till I know why things aren't working where I am.

    Oh and I forgot to respond real Linux men use things like Slackware, Arch, or Gentoo

  7. #7
    Linux Guru jmadero's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    California
    Posts
    1,998
    haha there's a joke floating around somewhere about gentoo users. Goes something like this:

    Gentoo User: I am superior because I install everything from source and use flags, it makes my system so much faster
    Any Other Distro User: Wow that's amazing that you use Gentoo, always seems so complicated
    Gentoo User: Yes, it is, but I'm a linux expert and Gentoo is so much better
    Any Other Distro User: How is it better?
    Gentoo User: Because it's faster, so much faster
    Any Other Distro User: Really? Give me an example
    Gentoo User: Well my boot time is at least 20% faster
    Any Other Distro User: How much is that in seconds
    Gentoo User: It's got to be at least 3-4 seconds
    Any Other Distro User: How long did it take you to setup your system to do that
    Gentoo User: I don't know, probably 10ish hours

    Any Other Distro User: Looks perplexed
    Gentoo User: Looks victorious
    Bodhi 1.3 & Bodhi 1.4 using E17
    Dell Studio 17, Intel Graphics card, 4 gigs of RAM, E17

    "The beauty in life can only be found by moving past the materialism which defines human nature and into the higher realm of thought and knowledge"

  8. #8
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Tow (rhymes with cow), Texas
    Posts
    31
    Like you, I started using Linux in about 2006. I stayed with Debian stable through Sarge, Etch, Lenny and Squeeze (using KDE with all of them) but switched to Kubuntu a few months back when I could no longer get a fully up-to-date browser or flash version. For me the up side of a FOSS OS has been that I haven't had to buy a new computer since 2006. Not only have I been able to scrounge a decent machine for myself, at little or no cost, I've managed to scrounge enough of them to have given away over three dozen machines with Linux installed on them. The only time I've ever been fully in charge of a Windows system was when I booted up a Linux CD and clicked on the Install icon. Linux rocks! Also, howdy and welcome aboard.

  9. #9
    Linux Engineer MASONTX's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Mason Texas
    Posts
    934
    Welcome to the forum. Glad to have you join us.
    Registered Linux user #526930

  10. #10
    Just Joined! MickeyRat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    9
    Quote Originally Posted by Eldergeek View Post
    Like you, I started using Linux in about 2006. I stayed with Debian stable through Sarge, Etch, Lenny and Squeeze (using KDE with all of them) but switched to Kubuntu a few months back when I could no longer get a fully up-to-date browser or flash version. For me the up side of a FOSS OS has been that I haven't had to buy a new computer since 2006. Not only have I been able to scrounge a decent machine for myself, at little or no cost, I've managed to scrounge enough of them to have given away over three dozen machines with Linux installed on them. The only time I've ever been fully in charge of a Windows system was when I booted up a Linux CD and clicked on the Install icon. Linux rocks! Also, howdy and welcome aboard.
    Glad to be here.

    Yep, I have a bunch of old desktops I put together over the years. At one point, I had an old pentium I was using with LEAF (Is that still around?) as a router back when routers were expensive and they hadn't been hacked. Now that I can slap dd-wrt on a $35 router, I doubt I'd fool with LEAF. The thing is that all my old computers are desktops and I've switched to laptops. However, my wife is tight as a drum. So, she wouldn't let me spend any money on her computer. I ended up getting her an old Lenovo on ebay. That wokred great with Ubuntu but, I started fooling with video and mp3s and the Inspiron I was using started feeling a little cramped. So, I bought an HP on ebay for me. Almost the day it came in that Lenovo cratered. So, she's got my old Inspiron now. For just web surfing and email though, Linux will work on just about anything with a CPU in it.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •