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Thanks for that, Mudgen ! That is actually good to know!...
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  1. #11
    Administrator jayd512's Avatar
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    Thanks for that, Mudgen!
    That is actually good to know!
    Jay

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  2. #12
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    There is nothing wrong with using EasyBCD, but your problem lies in that most dual-booting Linux users whether its Linux and Windows, Linux & BSD or some other combination will use GRUB or LILO simply because they are natively supported by Linux and Non-Windows OS (Solaris, BSD, Unix, Linux, etc) and because of that will be updated automatically through your software manager.

    Your other issue is that because your running EasyBCD not many of us will know how to help or fix a problem if it arises. Which means you will have to go to a Windows Forum as it is mainly a windows bootloader, This isn't an issue but could be if the problem is Linux related.

    I understand your frustration last time when trying to restore windows. But the easiest way to restore it is through the repair disk/ install disk and running command prompt. ./bootrec.exe and diskpart most of the time can fix it.
    I've been using easyBCD for so long that its hard for me to remember the problems I used to have. I remember certain Windows updates would overwrite the MBR with new Windows code that would only boot me into Windows until I could get a Linux rescue CD/DVD to fix the problem. With easyBCD, if that happens you can just fix the MBR in Windows and you don't need a rescue disk ... your life is so much better. Also, I never really understood what the lilo, grub or grub2 dual booting instructions had me do. With easyBCD, everything is intuitive. I had the feeling a Windows-based solution would cause tension and I was reluctant to click "Submit" to be honest but it really has made my life easier.

  3. #13
    Linux Newbie SL6-A1000's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrianMicek View Post
    I've been using easyBCD for so long that its hard for me to remember the problems I used to have. I remember certain Windows updates would overwrite the MBR with new Windows code that would only boot me into Windows until I could get a Linux rescue CD/DVD to fix the problem. With easyBCD, if that happens you can just fix the MBR in Windows and you don't need a rescue disk ... your life is so much better. Also, I never really understood what the lilo, grub or grub2 dual booting instructions had me do. With easyBCD, everything is intuitive. I had the feeling a Windows-based solution would cause tension and I was reluctant to click "Submit" to be honest but it really has made my life easier.
    Maybe a little tension but not really. The issue isn't that its windows based. The problem is being able to help you if you have a booting issue with Linux or Windows. Unless someone on here besides yourself knows EasyBCD, your going to need to go to a Windows Forum, and if the booting is solely with Linux than that also means most likely a Linux forum as well.

    If you get what i am saying, You'll not only need help for a Windows based bootloader but also for the Linux OS. That's two different pieces of information from two different places, so unless the information is similar than that will be a very hard for you to decode what it all means and whats appropriate to your situation.

    Mudgen
    I use BCD whenever I think the machine may need to be reverted to Windows-only at some point. It works very well, and it does not take grub out of play, you just install grub on the Linux partition instead of the MBR. Once BCD kicks the boot to grub, it's a standard grub boot scenario and help with any issues should be forthcoming here.
    I agree thatís useful to know, but it isn't really necessary, unless you have above >16 operating systems your trying to boot of one disk in an MBR partition format. If i am right and EasyBCD is similar to GRUB, it will allow for a max of 16 OS's from one Bootloader before requiring a second GRUB/ EasyBCD partition to boot another 16 OS's.

    It practically double handling of both Windows and Linux, and thus pointless. Why use EasyBCD if your just going to chainload into GRUB? Why not just boot GRUB? You still have to know GRUB when your doing it that way...

    I am not trying to tell you what to do, but simply just pointing out some of the issues you may face. Legacy GRUB especially is a rather simple bootloader. It runs from a txt document under grub.cfg and menu.lst, in the boot folder of Linux. It basically requires you to know the boot and root partition, Linux Kernel, and linux image location and name. GRUB2 is a re-modified version of legacy Grub with more functionality and a slightly different way of handling what is basically the same process. The biggest difference is GRUB2 has GUI managers (that can be used) and scripts which partially automate the process. If you understand one, you will figure out the other one very quickly and easily.
    ----------------------------------------------------------------

    If the problem lies with recovering windows when something goes wrong. Like for example GRUB is displaying your Windows and Linux partition but you cannot boot into Windows. Than this is entirely separate from the Bootloader, and is related to the your Windows start-up settings. Often if its GRUB related than nothing will boot not even Linux. On the other hand if GRUB works than it is Windows related. I.e. partitions or chainloading.

    The biggest error you can make is trying to restore the Windows MBR after you have installed GRUB in the MBR on a single disk. This almost always results in an unbootable system. Trust me, i have done this several times, it always results in the same problem and is almost always fixed by going back and re-setting up GRUB.
    The only time you use the Windows repair/install disk when GRUB is on the MBR is for command prompt and Diskpart, to make sure that the right partition is active for the MBR. E.g.
    Disk 1 Layout:
    Windows: Partition 1
    Linux: Partition 2
    Swap: Partition 3

    Windows is the primary 1st partition, thus the MBR is located on the Windows Partition, if grub isn't booting than this ultimately means that the Windows Partition is no longer active. This is when you would use the repair disk, and run command prompt to reactivate the windows partition.
    Last edited by SL6-A1000; 03-12-2012 at 04:57 AM.

  4. #14
    Linux User IsaacKuo's Avatar
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    If you want to set things up without touching your Windows hard drive(s), you could simply install GRUB onto a USB thumbdrive instead of a hard drive.

    (Obviously, you set up the BIOS to boot from the USB drive first, if necessary.)

    That way, you get a pristine Windows setup simply by removing the thumbdrive.
    Isaac Kuo, ICQ 29055726 or Yahoo mechdan

  5. #15
    Linux Enthusiast Mudgen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by IsaacKuo View Post
    If you want to set things up without touching your Windows hard drive(s), you could simply install GRUB onto a USB thumbdrive instead of a hard drive.

    (Obviously, you set up the BIOS to boot from the USB drive first, if necessary.)

    That way, you get a pristine Windows setup simply by removing the thumbdrive.
    I like this, a very cool idea for newer machines that will boot from USB. The new nano sized thumb drives barely project out of the port and can just be left in place, even on a laptop.

  6. #16
    Linux Newbie glene77is's Avatar
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    Isaac,
    Good idea to install Grub on a pendrive.

    Have several computer systems here.
    Have been booting "grub4dos" on a pendrive, into "grldr" and "menu.lst"
    My menu allows me to access
    (1) Puppy Linux on the pendrive
    (2) Parted Magic on the pendrive
    (3) M$ XP on the HD, as a chainloader /wxldr (see below)
    (4) Puppy Linux on the HD.

    Currently,
    (1) I am booting Puppy Linux from the pendrive. :geek:
    (2) I am able to re-boot into M$ XP on the HD, bypassing the MBR ,
    and
    (3) I am able to boot the HD in the normal power-up method,
    and the M$ MBR activates a file named "ntldr".

    This describes the "name switching" method that allows the original M$ XP MBR
    to jump into "grub4os" and "menu.lst".
    I renamed the grub4dos "grldr" to become a new "ntldr"
    The control then passes to the grub4dos "grldr" and "menu.lst" code.
    From the "menu.lst" I can select the two OS installed on the HD.
    At this point, M$ XP can be activated by "chainloader /wxldr"
    which is the original "ntldr" renamed to become "wxldr".

    This is more than the OP originally asked about, but you might find it interesting.

    glene77is
    Last edited by oz; 03-22-2012 at 05:09 PM. Reason: removed manual signature link

  7. #17
    Linux Newbie glene77is's Avatar
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    Mudgen,
    "Barely project out of the port"
    and when they figure out how to mount the chip on sideways,
    then it will look like a "T" shaped, dime-sized dongle !

    glene77is
    Last edited by oz; 03-22-2012 at 05:08 PM. Reason: removed manual signature link

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