Find the answer to your Linux question:
Results 1 to 9 of 9
Like Tree1Likes
  • 1 Post By jmadero
I'm trying to mae a bootdrive for Windows 7 (sorry, linux just isn't working out for me and I have no help from anyone, even here), and I keep running ...
Enjoy an ad free experience by logging in. Not a member yet? Register.
  1. #1
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    8

    UNetbootin


    I'm trying to mae a bootdrive for Windows 7 (sorry, linux just isn't working out for me and I have no help from anyone, even here), and I keep running into a problem. when I go to make a boot drive using UNetbootin, it says I need to mount the usb device. It's already mounted. what am I doing wrong?

  2. #2
    Linux Guru jmadero's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    California
    Posts
    1,998
    Format the USB with gparted or terminal and then try to mount again. Also, I don't think you can make a USB W7 pen drive with Unetbootin (I could be mistaken as I haven't tried in years but from what I remember the process was tedious, like most Windows products)
    Bodhi 1.3 & Bodhi 1.4 using E17
    Dell Studio 17, Intel Graphics card, 4 gigs of RAM, E17

    "The beauty in life can only be found by moving past the materialism which defines human nature and into the higher realm of thought and knowledge"

  3. #3
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    8
    webupd8.org/2010/10/create-bootable-windows-7-usb-drive.html

    only the UNetbootin download he provides does not work.

  4. $spacer_open
    $spacer_close
  5. #4
    Linux Newbie mactruck's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    City of Salt
    Posts
    187
    Quote Originally Posted by TimberWolf View Post
    I'm trying to mae a bootdrive for Windows 7 (sorry, linux just isn't working out for me and I have no help from anyone, even here), and I keep running into a problem. when I go to make a boot drive using UNetbootin, it says I need to mount the usb device. It's already mounted. what am I doing wrong?
    What are you not getting help with? You joined 5 days ago and have asked one question and it looks like someone was trying to help you. If you stick with it I am sure you will really enjoy Linux. New things can be very frustrating sometimes. I don't have a lot of experience with loading games in wine but I would be more than happy to try and help you. When you are asking for help sometimes it takes a few days for someone who has had the same problem or knows how to fix your problem. I have asked for help on some scripts over two weeks ago and still have not figured out how to do what I need. Other times I have got the answer right away. If you would still like to figure this out then I will try and help you.

    edit: also you might get faster help if you ask in the wine section.

    mactruck.

  6. #5
    Linux User Krendoshazin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    London, England
    Posts
    471
    Quote Originally Posted by mactruck View Post
    If you stick with it I am sure you will really enjoy Linux. New things can be very frustrating sometimes.
    I agree. This is the second "I give up" post I've seen, and I feel that people are giving up too easily. GNU/Linux undoubtedly has a highly learning curve, but once you get over that it's pretty smooth sailing.

  7. #6
    Linux Guru jmadero's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    California
    Posts
    1,998
    I actually think the learning curve is lower than Windows. I think people get confused with how we learn and treat it as difficult/non difficult. Windows we learn because we are forced to, so if we dont' learn it, we blame ourselves for being stupid because everyone else is able to get it (not really, but it's the impression). While Linux is on the "Fringe" so if we don't get it we go to our natural tendency of blaming others (ie. blaming Linux) and calling it "just too hard". In general though if you look at the functionality of Linux compared to Windows, it's much easier, then add how much more secure it is and how few problems really can happen in Linux and you find yourself scratching your head saying "I can't believe I ever used Windows"
    jayd512 likes this.
    Bodhi 1.3 & Bodhi 1.4 using E17
    Dell Studio 17, Intel Graphics card, 4 gigs of RAM, E17

    "The beauty in life can only be found by moving past the materialism which defines human nature and into the higher realm of thought and knowledge"

  8. #7
    Administrator jayd512's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    5,023
    jmadero,, Nicely said!
    I give these rarely...
    Jay

    New users, read this first.
    New Member FAQ
    Registered Linux User #463940
    I do not respond to private messages asking for Linux help. Please keep it on the public boards.

  9. #8
    Linux User Krendoshazin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    London, England
    Posts
    471
    Quote Originally Posted by jmadero View Post
    I actually think the learning curve is lower than Windows. I think people get confused with how we learn and treat it as difficult/non difficult.
    I agree with you on many respects, and I think that the distros that cater to newbies certainly help to smooth a lot of the curves, but I still think that the learning curves are higher. Many distros now have package repos and automatic dependency resolving -- which is probably the one single thing that has made things more "user friendly" -- but this isn't the case with all distros and each one has its own different package manager. As such things are distro specific, users tend to become dependent on a particular distro to get the job done.

    Windows tries to shield as much from the user as possible, going as far as to execute pretty much anything that the user throws at it -- which is why it gets itself into a lot of trouble. It overwrites DLLs, it automatically installs updates, even program installers try to be as simple as possible; it makes me laugh when the only extra thing you get by choosing "advanced" is some proxy settings.

    When I look at distros like Ubuntu, I see a distro that just seems to be trying to be Windows: It's trying to make the user's life as simple as possible by removing potential sources of aggrevation. How can people claim to really *know* GNU/Linux when all they're using is a free Windows clone?

  10. #9
    Linux Guru jmadero's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    California
    Posts
    1,998
    @ Jay - thanks I'll take any bananas I can get haha

    @Krendoshazin - seems like this is opening a can of worms where we'll ultimately agree to disagree. I think Ubuntu is a solid distro that is Linux, not Windows. I could list of the reasons why I think it but I doubt I'll change your mind. As for the last statement, there are plenty here that would argue unless you install everything from source you don't really know Linux, I tend to disagree with this as I attempt to avoid source installations as much as possible I still refuse to try Gentoo just because I've heard it's a time suck, and at this point, I just don't have the energy to do it
    Bodhi 1.3 & Bodhi 1.4 using E17
    Dell Studio 17, Intel Graphics card, 4 gigs of RAM, E17

    "The beauty in life can only be found by moving past the materialism which defines human nature and into the higher realm of thought and knowledge"

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •