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Nearly all distros have something to like about them but I particulary like Slackware, Salix, Debian, LMDE, Crunchbang and Mint. If I had to pick a favourite it would be ...
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  1. #11
    Penguin of trust elija's Avatar
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    Nearly all distros have something to like about them but I particulary like Slackware, Salix, Debian, LMDE, Crunchbang and Mint. If I had to pick a favourite it would be LMDE as it's the one that, among all the others has made it to and looks like staying on my main desktop machine.

    Slackware and Debian are both awesome but require too mauch manual setting up and I'm getting one or more of too old, too busy or too lazy to be dealing with that these days. Nice simple install, setup and management count a lot for me.

    On servers, it is either Debian or Centos.

    [edit]Also like Xubuntu. Certainly upto 11.10.[/edit]
    Last edited by elija; 05-01-2012 at 11:57 AM.
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  2. #12
    Linux Engineer hazel's Avatar
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    I would say try:
    1) Crux for speed and simplicity
    2) Debian for being "just Linux", the most mainstream of all distros, and for having a huge software repository
    3) Slackware for being very stable but slightly quirky, and for teaching you to do your own dependency checking.
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  3. #13
    oz
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    Quote Originally Posted by supernerd View Post
    Basically, my post is what's your favorite Linux and what do you like and dislike about it?
    Hello and welcome to the forums!

    My favorite Linux distribution for the last 8 years or so has been Arch Linux.

    I like it because of pacman, the default package manager for Arch. The developers keep the packages and repositories very well updated for the most part. It is a manually configured distribution that comes with very few GUI tools to get in the way. Overall, this distribution and I just seem to click, so I find it far easier to use and more logical than any of the other distributions that I've ever tried (about 50 or 60 of them over the years).

    There really isn't much about Arch that I don't like, so I'm unable to comment on that.

    Good luck to you with your own choice of distributions!
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  4. #14
    Penguin of trust elija's Avatar
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    This thread is further proof that you will never get a consensus about this question and a fantastic example why the sheer amount of choice in the Linux ecosystem is a good thing!
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  5. #15
    oz
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    Totally in agreement with you, elija!

    Even if there were a complete listing to be found of the good and the bad points to every distribution that's available, there would still be plenty of confusion and disagreement on the subject because the points presented would only be the opinion of the person that compiled the listing. Unfortunately for new Linux users, they won't ever know how they personally feel about any particular distribution until they've actually tried it for themselves.
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  6. #16
    Just Joined! Sidekick's Avatar
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    Debian as a base! But the 'buntu bunch to make Debian work on the desktop for casual users. And Xubuntu in particular because it still fits on a CD, uses lightweight (mostly) stuff to keep it fast, and has the great Xfce desktop. I was a xubu fan before it was cool (which was the moment Unity was introduced, lol).
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  7. #17
    Just Joined! Randicus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by oz View Post
    Totally in agreement with you, elija!

    Even if there were a complete listing to be found of the good and the bad points to every distribution that's available, there would still be plenty of confusion and disagreement on the subject because the points presented would only be the opinion of the person that compiled the listing. Unfortunately for new Linux users, they won't ever know how they personally feel about any particular distribution until they've actually tried it for themselves.
    Hallelujah! No offence to the OP intended, but I do not understand the plethora of posts on fora everywhere on the internet asking the question, Which Linux system should I use? Every system is designed for different people, both knowledge level and personality (personal likes and dislikes). The only way to know if one will like a distribution is try it. It is like buying a car. My neighbour and I may have drastically different ideas about what constitutes a good automobile. I believe I have mentioned it here before. When I switched to GNU-Linux, I down-loaded three ISOs, burned the discs and tried the systems. I neither read nor asked for opinions. And I do not regret it. Anyone contemplating a migration to Linuxland should not be afraid to experiment. Try as many distros as one can stomach. If one does not like a system, it is only a wasted disc. Fear not!
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  8. #18
    Penguin of trust elija's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Randicus View Post
    No offence to the OP intended, but I do not understand the plethora of posts on fora everywhere on the internet asking the question, Which Linux system should I use?
    Those who ask this question are used to the proprietary "you will do it this way" operating systems. They are not used to having a choice in the world of computing, so in that context, I think it is understandable that they look for the "you should do it this way" answer.
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    What do we want?
    Time machines!

    When do we want 'em?
    Doesn't really matter does it!?


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  9. #19
    Linux User Krendoshazin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Randicus View Post
    If one does not like a system, it is only a wasted disc.
    I think it would be worth picking up a few CD-RWs to experiment with. I've found the Philips CD-RWs to be pretty good: I've burned and erased one disc about 20 times and I've rarely seen a bad hash.
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  10. #20
    Just Joined! Randicus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by elija View Post
    Those who ask this question are used to the proprietary "you will do it this way" operating systems. They are not used to having a choice in the world of computing, so in that context, I think it is understandable that they look for the "you should do it this way" answer.
    You are probably correct. Perhaps I am atypical. First, I checked out a Linux site, probably linux.org/com? I quickly discovered that there were many distributions, so I read the information offered there and visited the web-sites of those distros that sounded good for a little more information. OSs are no different than anything else. Most people get information before buying things like computers and clothing (and should when buying cars, but I am sure many do not), so why not look for information about OSs? As an anthropologist, I find it interesting how many people do not think about computers the same way they think of other tools. They do not even consider the computer a tool, but something on a different plane. Perhaps I should write an article about it.

    Originally Posted by Krendoshazin
    I think it would be worth picking up a few CD-RWs to experiment with. I've found the Philips CD-RWs to be pretty good: I've burned and erased one disc about 20 times and I've rarely seen a bad hash.
    Good thinking. Solves the waste issue.
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