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Thank you so much everyone for your replies! It looks like I am going to have a lot of distros to try! Randicus: Hallelujah! No offence to the OP intended, ...
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  1. #21
    Just Joined! supernerd's Avatar
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    Thank you so much everyone for your replies!

    It looks like I am going to have a lot of distros to try!

    Randicus:
    Hallelujah! No offence to the OP intended, but I do not understand the plethora of posts on fora everywhere on the internet asking the question, Which Linux system should I use? Every system is designed for different people, both knowledge level and personality (personal likes and dislikes). The only way to know if one will like a distribution is try it. It is like buying a car. My neighbour and I may have drastically different ideas about what constitutes a good automobile. I believe I have mentioned it here before. When I switched to GNU-Linux, I down-loaded three ISOs, burned the discs and tried the systems. I neither read nor asked for opinions. And I do not regret it. Anyone contemplating a migration to Linuxland should not be afraid to experiment. Try as many distros as one can stomach. If one does not like a system, it is only a wasted disc. Fear not!
    elija:
    Those who ask this question are used to the proprietary "you will do it this way" operating systems. They are not used to having a choice in the world of computing, so in that context, I think it is understandable that they look for the "you should do it this way" answer.
    No offense taken Randicus and elija. You're point is completely right, and the freedom to choose or create the system right for oneself personally is kind of the whole point of migrating to linux. However, the intent of my post was not "Think for me, and tell me which linux I should use." I just wanted some experienced peoples' opinions and impressions of the distros they liked, and what they liked about them, so when I started trying different ones out I would have a better idea of approximately where, among the plethora of choices, to begin my search. Thanks to people replying to this thread, I don't have to try every single linux distro arbitrarily; I will begin by trying Mint, CRUX, Slackware, Archlinux, Fedora, etc(not necessarily in that order), because they seem to be somewhat along the lines of what I'm looking for.

    Krendoshazin:
    I build my own distros from scratch. I've been using my current system for about 3 or 4 years now; it's so stable that I have real trouble convincing myself to build another one -- but I'll get around to it one day.

    If I had to pick an actual distro from all the ones available, it would be Slackware. It's the first distro I ever used and I'm using it on my laptop: an old 600MHz Dell Latitude that I keep as pure command line. I hacked the CD drive module and put a DVD drive in instead, and I used a PCMCIA card for wifi (supported by native drivers) -- so all in all it's pretty functional.
    Krendoshazin, thanks for the Phillips CD-RW suggestion. When you say you build your own distros from scratch, how did you begin doing that? How did you start? Did you use the Linux From Scratch(linuxfromscratch dot org) resource, or are you just such a bad ass with linux that you had enough knowledge and skill to just build your own distro from the ground up. I want to make my own distro eventually, as kind of a long term linux goal, so your mention of this sparked my interest.

    Anyway, thanks again everyone for your replies. I really appreciate you people who kindly sacrifice some of your time to share some of your knowledge with me, a random nobody on the internet.

  2. #22
    Penguin of trust elija's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by supernerd View Post
    However, the intent of my post was not "Think for me, and tell me which linux I should use."
    Sorry, I had no intention of implying that. I remember how overwhelming the choice was when I first ventured into the free world and going by the number of times this or similar questions get asked I would guess that a lot of people feel the same so I was speculating as to why.

    Quote Originally Posted by supernerd View Post
    Thanks to people replying to this thread, I don't have to try every single linux distro arbitrarily;
    You say that now but trying different distros is addictive. My name's Elija and I'm a distroholic!

    Quote Originally Posted by supernerd View Post
    I will begin by trying Mint, CRUX, Slackware, Archlinux, Fedora, etc(not necessarily in that order), because they seem to be somewhat along the lines of what I'm looking for.
    And so it begins (see above )
    Last edited by elija; 05-04-2012 at 09:42 AM.
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  3. #23
    Linux User Krendoshazin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by supernerd View Post
    Krendoshazin, thanks for the Phillips CD-RW suggestion. When you say you build your own distros from scratch, how did you begin doing that? How did you start? Did you use the Linux From Scratch(linuxfromscratch dot org) resource, or are you just such a bad ass with linux that you had enough knowledge and skill to just build your own distro from the ground up. I want to make my own distro eventually, as kind of a long term linux goal, so your mention of this sparked my interest.
    I started off with LFS, yes. The first time I did it I stuck to the book word for word, but after building a few distros I started to deviate from the book and incorporate stuff I liked from DIY Linux; I often used the latest versions where the book hadn't caught up yet, and I fixed incompatibilities and build issues myself. I often contributed what I discovered back to the project, and about 3 or 4 years ago I was made a BLFS editor -- so now I write the book.
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  4. #24
    Linux Enthusiast Bemk's Avatar
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    I use Debian testing, with Gnome 3.
    I hear loads of people complain about Gnome 3, that they can't find anything and stuff like that. I don't really seem to have that issue (but then again I've got 11 terminals open). I guess that as long as I can use bash in a GUI, I'm happy!
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    My PC runs on Lubuntu and my laptop dual boots with Xubuntu and OpenSuse.

    Lubuntu and Xubuntu I use when I'm at home. They both are pretty easy on memory so it's good to run games on.
    (Sometimes I play The Elder Scrolls - Oblivion on Lubuntu).

    For use at school I have OpenSuse with Gnome. Because I only need internet and office applications at school I have lots of memory left, so in that case I like a nice looking desktop.

    The most important thing about Linux and any OS I think is freedom of Choice. I like having distros available for all kinds of systems and user needs.
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  6. #26
    Just Joined! shamino's Avatar
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    Ultimately, this question depends greatly on what you need. Do you want to live on (or over?) the bleeding edge? Do you need the latest features? Or do you need something that is stable and secure, even if some aspects may be old and outdated by some people's logic?

    For people who want more stability (possibly because they are running a production server) I recommend Red Hat Enterprise Linux. RHEL is far from the latest and greatest, but they make a point of not releasing something that will cause disruption to a running system. So (for instance) the latest kernel revision for RHEL 5 is 2.6.18-308.4.1.el5 - they're still shipping 2.6.18, but with over 308 patches (many of which are backported from more recent kernels) to fix critical bugs and support newer hardware.

    RHEL, however, is not free (as in "free beer", of course.) You have to pay an annual subscription fee to be able to download updates, and the cheapest releases don't support things like multiple CPUs and very large RAM sizes.

    For those who want RHEL, but don't want to pay the maintenance fees, there is CentOS. CentOS is a free distribution built from the RedHat sources (sans any proprietary packages and without any RH branding.)

    I like RHEL (especially the RPN package system) and use it on the systems I manage at work.

    For those who like the RHEL design but want more cutting-edge features (and less extensive testing/support), Fedora is a good solution. It is based on the RedHat architecture, but is community-sponsored. A lot (but not all) of what the Fedora team develops eventually ends up in some release of RHEL.

    All of the above are based on RedHat's branch of the distribution family tree. I happen to like this branch, mostly because it's what I started out using. Many others will recommend other distributions from other branches, especially those based on the Debian package system.

    For those who prefer the Debian branch and like to live on the bleeding edge, I recommend Ubuntu. It is frequently updated and has a very easy to use graphical package management tool. They also have package channels where you can download versions that have not been fully tested (and may be unstable) if you like working with that kind of software.

    Note that you don't have to use Unity with Ubuntu. They have packages for other desktop environments. I usually use either Gnome or the venerable Fvwm with the Ubuntu systems I run.

    If you like the Debian package system and want something that is more stable than cutting-edge, I'm afraid someone else will have to help out. Ubuntu is the only Debian-derived distribution I have personal experience with.
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  7. #27
    Just Joined! shamino's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by elija View Post
    You say that now but trying different distros is addictive. My name's Elija and I'm a distroholic!
    And this is why Virtualbox is so wonderful. As long as you have a big enough hard drive, you can install and play with lots of different distributions, even all at the same time, without worrying that a mistake might end up clobbering your system.
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