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Kind of an interesting stereotype I have here because most car guys don't know jack about computers (maybe a wee bit of computer knowledge with tuners) and most computer people ...
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  1. #1
    Linux Newbie Syndacate's Avatar
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    Any motorsports (car/bike) people here?


    Kind of an interesting stereotype I have here because most car guys don't know jack about computers (maybe a wee bit of computer knowledge with tuners) and most computer people I know don't know jack about cars (other than spec sheets and 'informed consumer').

    I'm an oddity in that mix because I love computers (most specifically systems *, so system architecture, systems programming, system designs, etc.) and I love cars (love working on them, love modifying them, love tuning them) as well as riding motorcycles (again, love everything about engines, and there's no feeling like riding!). I'm finishing up my CS MS, so computers kind of has me by trade (kind of ironic as I switched from mech E to soft E to CS), but cars has a very dear place in my heart - along with computers!

    So, this being a computer forum (to a large extent, anyway), I was wondering if there were other people out there in the same boat as me? If so, what motorsports and such are you interested in?

    I fell in love with SCCA Solo (autocross) competition because it's so driver dependent. Don't need millions of dollars to perform well. Sort of like Linux!

    I generally love all types of motorsports, I'll watch anything from jet ski racing to semi-truck pulls to mud bogging videos to D1 or Togue to drag racing. If it has a motor, it's awesome. If the motor meets a computer, it's even cooler.

    My current vehicle list is low because I'm trying to sell everything before I have to move cross country upon graduation (job accepted 2800 miles west):
    - '97 Civic EX Coupe
    - '05 Neon SRT-4
    - '04 R1 (kinked the chain and nearly dumped it, selling it "as-is" this weekend with a massive hole in the stator housing - not running )
    - '82 CM450E - should be my daily bike but it's not running right, carbs are apart all over my bathroom at the moment.

    Here's a video I just posted of 2 weekends ago, Misery Bay Region's Solo comp #5, Lake Erie Speedway, Lake Erie, PA, about a 2 hour drive from here in Rochester, NY. Took the SRT-4 out there, placed 1st in G-stock

  2. #2
    Linux Guru rokytnji's Avatar
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    Been a out spoken outlaw linux tattooed biker on this forum for ages. Just check out linux in social groups or my profile.

    I'm not computer savvy like some here. But I get around in Linux OK.
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    Linux Guru Lazydog's Avatar
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    I too like to ride motorcycles, nothing special here just a Kawasaki Vulcan 750. I love the HPDE (High Performance Driver Education) in my area and have driven a few tracks around here. Here you learn to drive at high speeds on a track. I was in Pocono's Raceway this past May. I was able to drive the whole tri-oval like NASCAR. I have to say I love driving a road course more then a oval. For a car I drive an Audi S6 v10.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rokytnji View Post
    Been a out spoken outlaw linux tattooed biker on this forum for ages. Just check out linux in social groups or my profile.

    I'm not computer savvy like some here. But I get around in Linux OK.
    Ha, then we have some stuff in common, then . Although I'm not sure about a tattoo yet. Wanted to get one of a spooled up turbo, but def. wanna double think it before I go, that ****'s permanent. Not sure how I feel about a linux social group on a linux forum? That's just confusing, lol.

    That's the great thing about Linux (or any FOS OS), it can be as easy or hard as somebody wants to make it. That's one thing Ubuntu did right, they pioneered (IMO, anyways) Linux to be usable for end-users. It wasn't until their examples in the early days that I feel other distros put a big weight on usability by the 'lesser skilled.' I'm 'computer savvy' (without tooting my own horn) but on my daily OS, I just want something that works, not something I have to tinker with to get it to work. Therefore I typically use Ubuntu.

    Looks like you got some belt drive action in your album, how is it? I've been meaning to ride a belt-drive bike, but never have. Sick and tired of lubing my chains every 500, though :-\ (gotta get a scott oiler or something).

    I see by trade you run a motorcycle garage, I should drag your ass up to NY and make you help me fix my Honda . Vintage carbs are kicking my ass all over the place and the damn thing hasn't run right since day 1. I <3 my EFI!!, haha.

    Quote Originally Posted by Lazydog View Post
    I too like to ride motorcycles, nothing special here just a Kawasaki Vulcan 750. I love the HPDE (High Performance Driver Education) in my area and have driven a few tracks around here. Here you learn to drive at high speeds on a track. I was in Pocono's Raceway this past May. I was able to drive the whole tri-oval like NASCAR. I have to say I love driving a road course more then a oval. For a car I drive an Audi S6 v10.
    The Vulcans are nice bikes, heard nothing but good things about them. I want to take an HPDE day at some point, I've looked into it, but I gotta wait for a bit. Right now I don't even have a super sport bike that's track worthy (see R1 note).

    I need to take the MSF advanced riders course at some point, just to make sure I can do well on it. Gotta do that before I tackle any HPDEs. Pocono raceway is only like an hour and 15 from where I grew up (On the PA border, NY side). Never actually been there, though. It looks like a good venue. The road courses are obviously going to be more fun but I think a tri-oval like that is better to start off with as far as tracks go. Once I get another sports bike I'll def. do an HPDE (after I do the MSF ARC). What kind of gear did they require where you went?

    As for your car, the S6's are pretty beastly, haven't seen one up close and personal (though I love the S4's). What year is it? I think I'm done owning VW/Audis for awhile, at least newer ones, after to MKIV dubs I was made aware that there are so many things could break on car for no reason O.o. Not sure I wanna go back down that road, haha.

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    Linux Guru Lazydog's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Syndacate View Post
    The Vulcans are nice bikes, heard nothing but good things about them.
    20 years without a change to the design tells you something about it.

    The road courses are obviously going to be more fun but I think a tri-oval like that is better to start off with as far as tracks go. Once I get another sports bike I'll def. do an HPDE (after I do the MSF ARC). What kind of gear did they require where you went?
    The tri-oval is good for getting you used to the speeds you can travel, but it is like night and day once you switch to the road courses.

    As for your car, the S6's are pretty beastly, haven't seen one up close and personal (though I love the S4's). What year is it?
    2008

    I think I'm done owning VW/Audis for awhile, at least newer ones, after to MKIV dubs I was made aware that there are so many things could break on car for no reason O.o. Not sure I wanna go back down that road, haha.
    I think as technology is more engrained into the car systems the more it becomes a problem. Things that we normally would worry about are now showing up on the dashboard. Take the washer levels if it is low we get to see a light until you put some fluid in. In the beginning the on-board-computer only checked a hand full of things. Today it check everything except if the driver has been drinking or not and I am sure that isn't far off.

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    Linux Guru rokytnji's Avatar
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    I could handle Northern NY right now. The heat here this summer is killer hot. I only run belt on primary from engine to tranny on my old iron. Rear drive is chain only on those, though the Big Dog Mastiff is easy to run the rear belt drive because it has the right side 6 speed tranny rear pulley instead of the stock left hand side 5 speed rear pulley on store bought HD's.

    I like the chain better on rear wheel. A master link is easy to carry on a key chain and out here in the wild west. it is a long walk home in 100+ F heat. So I can fix a busted chain in minutes on the side of the road with a Leatherman Knife. Busted Belt. Better have shade and a cell phone (I abhor cell phones, too easy to track me), and some friends.

    I also keep a 63 F100 that runs on propane or gasoline, but we have a 2 seater race car also (for my wife and her purse ), plus I have a 2007 Nissan 4 door Frontier PU ,(still paying on it). All my scooters are bought and paid for plus I have a few basket cases to make other motorcycles, if the economy picks up .
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lazydog View Post
    20 years without a change to the design tells you something about it.
    Somebody's loyal

    Quote Originally Posted by Lazydog View Post
    The tri-oval is good for getting you used to the speeds you can travel, but it is like night and day once you switch to the road courses.
    Yeah, figured, the tri-oval has gotta be better than nothing, though.

    Quote Originally Posted by Lazydog View Post
    2008
    Nice. Lots of power there, good ride. I'd be much more fond of Audis/Dubs if my first 2 experiences weren't horrifying . I like doing my own work, and well, MKIV + dubs hate you if you do your own work, haha.

    Quote Originally Posted by Lazydog View Post
    I think as technology is more engrained into the car systems the more it becomes a problem. Things that we normally would worry about are now showing up on the dashboard. Take the washer levels if it is low we get to see a light until you put some fluid in. In the beginning the on-board-computer only checked a hand full of things. Today it check everything except if the driver has been drinking or not and I am sure that isn't far off.
    Yeah, the more tech that becomes the core of the car, the harder it is for DIY'ers like myself to do...anything. I like the simple computers. Runs the engine, nothing more. That's how I learned cars.

    Quote Originally Posted by rokytnji View Post
    I could handle Northern NY right now. The heat here this summer is killer hot. I only run belt on primary from engine to tranny on my old iron. Rear drive is chain only on those, though the Big Dog Mastiff is easy to run the rear belt drive because it has the right side 6 speed tranny rear pulley instead of the stock left hand side 5 speed rear pulley on store bought HD's.

    I like the chain better on rear wheel. A master link is easy to carry on a key chain and out here in the wild west. it is a long walk home in 100+ F heat. So I can fix a busted chain in minutes on the side of the road with a Leatherman Knife. Busted Belt. Better have shade and a cell phone (I abhor cell phones, too easy to track me), and some friends.

    I also keep a 63 F100 that runs on propane or gasoline, but we have a 2 seater race car also (for my wife and her purse ), plus I have a 2007 Nissan 4 door Frontier PU ,(still paying on it). All my scooters are bought and paid for plus I have a few basket cases to make other motorcycles, if the economy picks up .
    I hear ya.

    So let's say you'd never have to walk or wait anywhere in 100*F heat.

    Which would you say is better? I feel like the belts would be a bit more forgiving on throttle on/off, but I've never rode one so I can't really say. Do the belts have reliability problems?

    BTW: That F100 is bad-ass, lol.

  8. #8
    Linux Guru rokytnji's Avatar
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    Do the belts have reliability problems?
    Only if adjusted wrong. The kevlar is pretty tough. Dry rot can be a issue after time also. Replacing a belt can be a pain also if needing to remove the swing arm (stock harleys have this friggin flaw), to get it onto the back wheel pulley also. If inner primary is covering the front pulley (another stock harley flaw). Well, that takes hours and special tools tools also to replace the belt. Pretty much a personal preference thing really. You might want to look into what it takes to install a rear belt on a/your Honda first.
    Belts do last longer than chains if maintained properly like anything else. I get good life on my chain drive bikes (see my comment below on how I do this).

    Motorcycle Chain? Belt? Shaft? Which is Better? | Motorcycle-Intelligence.com

    If sport bike. Then chain is the way to go, though I watched your video. Tough luck there. If a cruiser. Then belt is OK. I do preflight checks on chain and tires every week. I used to be a helicopter tech so it is just habit. I also pull the chains periodically and soak them in diesel fluid to clean the chain and then soak them in a tub of oil before remounting. I do this every few months. Keeps them lasting. I also use high dollar o-ring chain systems.

    I had to get off the internet for awhile. Everything on the net with politics,war,bigots and shootings was getting me depressed, so I took a vacation from the computer. I was getting ready to blow a fuse online with some people but instead decided to do the "water off a ducks back" philosophy instead and just walk away.

    If that is your Honda. Those Mikuni or Keihin carbs are pretty easy to rebuild.

    1982 Honda Motorcycle CM450E Fuel Systems - JCWhitney

    Also. Check your petcock for dirt or slime in case it was clogged at the gas tank. I would have checked that first before pulling the carbs.

    When tuning dual or more carbs. I use vacuum gauges instead of mercury stick gauges. You can screw the pooch if you over rev the motor and pull mercury into you motor with mercury gauges.

    I bought a 850 triple 850cc Yamaha shaft drive once for $200.00 where the carbs and electrical were trashed. I bought the mikuni kits for $45.00 for the carbs, Rebuilt those. Repaired the main wiring harness. Sold that bike to a kid on payments for $1,500.00. He bought it 2 years ago. He is still riding it
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    Quote Originally Posted by rokytnji View Post
    Only if adjusted wrong. The kevlar is pretty tough. Dry rot can be a issue after time also. Replacing a belt can be a pain also if needing to remove the swing arm (stock harleys have this friggin flaw), to get it onto the back wheel pulley also. If inner primary is covering the front pulley (another stock harley flaw). Well, that takes hours and special tools tools also to replace the belt. Pretty much a personal preference thing really. You might want to look into what it takes to install a rear belt on a/your Honda first.
    Belts do last longer than chains if maintained properly like anything else. I get good life on my chain drive bikes (see my comment below on how I do this).

    Motorcycle Chain? Belt? Shaft? Which is Better? | Motorcycle-Intelligence.com
    Yeah, the same goes for chains, though, tension can lead to premature failure of the sprocket or links, the front sprocket cover is often a bit of a pain to get to on sport bikes. Though I hear what you mean.

    Removing the swing arm is TERRIBLE, but luckily most new HD have no problems going to the stealership, heh.

    I'm not going to put the time into doing a belt conversion on my Honda unless it's stupid easy, I was just curious b/c I've never ridden one before! I imagine the throttle feels a bit softer, but meh, I'll have to ride one at some point. I'll check out the link when I get a bit. Driveshafts are pretty nice maintenance wise, but can't transfer power as well.

    Quote Originally Posted by rokytnji View Post
    If sport bike. Then chain is the way to go, though I watched your video. Tough luck there. If a cruiser. Then belt is OK. I do preflight checks on chain and tires every week. I used to be a helicopter tech so it is just habit. I also pull the chains periodically and soak them in diesel fluid to clean the chain and then soak them in a tub of oil before remounting. I do this every few months. Keeps them lasting. I also use high dollar o-ring chain systems.
    I've heard of using diesel/kerosene to clean chains well. I, unfortunately, don't have the riding exp to really determine good from bad at first look like many avid bikers can. I also have a rather hectic schedule which doesn't always give me a lot of free time, so when I do get free time, I never do maintenance and such. That's why my chain busted, between inexperience and time, things sometimes don't become a problem until they ARE a problem, y'know?

    Quote Originally Posted by rokytnji View Post
    I had to get off the internet for awhile. Everything on the net with politics,war,bigots and shootings was getting me depressed, so I took a vacation from the computer. I was getting ready to blow a fuse online with some people but instead decided to do the "water off a ducks back" philosophy instead and just walk away.
    Oh I definitely hear ya there. People are idiots online, and there's a wealth of depressing information that you'll bump into if you don't tread carefully. Sometimes it's better just to walk away from it, I've been there a lot.

    Quote Originally Posted by rokytnji View Post
    If that is your Honda. Those Mikuni or Keihin carbs are pretty easy to rebuild.

    1982 Honda Motorcycle CM450E Fuel Systems - JCWhitney

    Also. Check your petcock for dirt or slime in case it was clogged at the gas tank. I would have checked that first before pulling the carbs.

    When tuning dual or more carbs. I use vacuum gauges instead of mercury stick gauges. You can screw the pooch if you over rev the motor and pull mercury into you motor with mercury gauges.

    I bought a 850 triple 850cc Yamaha shaft drive once for $200.00 where the carbs and electrical were trashed. I bought the mikuni kits for $45.00 for the carbs, Rebuilt those. Repaired the main wiring harness. Sold that bike to a kid on payments for $1,500.00. He bought it 2 years ago. He is still riding it
    Yeah, they're the Keihin V22's. Yeah, they shouldn't be too hard to rebuild, but a few things are working against me including A) My general lack of knowledge regarding carbs regardless of how many carburetor theory notes I've read, and B) I have a bad habit of breaking ****, lol. Bolt-heads beware! So far no serious damage to the carbs, heh. Fingers crossed. Going to be putting them back together tomorrow (hopefully). Kind of grew up in the wrong era for carbs, lol.

    I probably should have checked the petcock first, but I didn't even think of it. How exactly do you check the "quality of the flow?" It's not like an injected system where you can just measure your fuel pressure at the rail :-\.

    I'm actually going with the cheap DIY route using 2 glass bottles with tight necks and 3 hoses. I got sync nipples for the head, haven't installed them yet. Hopefully it'll work well...

    That's pretty bad-ass flip on the bike. Mine is the opposite experience, I bought it for $750, knew it had a stuttering problem, figured the carbs just needed to be cleaned. Did it because I sold my GSX-750F and since my R1 was down I had nothing to ride. So I fell in love with this stupid thing, and the stuttering got worse and worse until it was basically unrideable not even 200 miles later. So I cleaned the carbs (no rebuild), no difference. I began to think it wasn't carb related at that point and ended up buying a new CDI Box ($100) and did a GM ($30-$50) coil conversion (still need to find a place to mount the new coil :-\), now I just bought about $100 worth of air cut-off, accelerator pump diaphragms, cleaning supplies to clean them up, new jets, etc., and am going to have another shot at cleaning them. So I'm about $1k in the hole (my budget for this bike was supposed to be $1k) and the rear tire is completely flat (no chords showing yet, though) in terms of tread, and the front brakes are 'iffy' at best (though the PO claimed the shoes just needed to be pushed out a bit because he pulled them in as he's used to dirt bikes (I claim BS, but w.e)). It's probably also in need of a chain but it's hard for me to tell. I love the bike due to its simplicity, but obviously its 'simplicity' is getting the better of me by FAR. When I settle down I'm going to start project; "V22 Fuel Injection Conversion" with my CAD knowledge and some electrical work.

    Last it sat before I pulled the carbs it was running sometimes on 2 cylinders, typically on one cylinder, backfiring in the intake manifold on the right side. At this point I'd be surprised if it was running again none-the-less running right. In case you can't tell, this bike is the story of my life, lol. "Just a summer bike" - I said. What can possibly go wrong? HA.

  10. #10
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    I probably should have checked the petcock first, but I didn't even think of it. How exactly do you check the "quality of the flow?
    Just check the filter and make sure the vacuum line from engine to petcock does not have a hole in it or is kinked anywhere. Same for fuel line to carbs. You probably use vacuum from the intake manifold with a hose running up to the petcock to pull fuel from the tank so hard to check the flow into a gas can without the engine running.
    What to do When Your Motorcycle Won't Start - Motorcycle Cruiser Magazine
    That is why I keep a few shovel head bikes with gravity feed tanks and petcocks and points ignition. I use a external home made tank stand so I can remove tank from the bike and run longer hoses to check fuel flow from the external stand also.

    I use 6 cyl chevy points and condensers from the local auto parts store on my old harleys. It is a old biker trick from the 1970's. In a pinch. I can also use a john deere dealership tractor chain also on my bikes if needed in a worse case scenario. I also have made gaskets from 12 pack beer boxes also in a pinch and have used a hand file to fix a bros bike with a blown head gasket with a warped head. Used the file as a straight edge and machine tool. I have a feeler gauge I carry in a tool kit on my bikes for points and plugs. I have been riding scooters since the 70's when it was dangerous so I have been around some old school bikers around a camp fire. You pick up tricks that way.

    Last it sat before I pulled the carbs it was running sometimes on 2 cylinders, typically on one cylinder, backfiring in the intake manifold on the right side.
    I would have started by pulling spark plug wires first and check for spark on each wire with a screw driver to aluminum on motor. If spark was OK. I would have pulled the plugs and put known good ones in next. If still a problem.
    I would have moved on to battery next and check for loose connection on battery terminals (vibration loosens them up in time). If still a problem. I would then have gone from petcock to carbs in the order I stated previously.

    I'd probably have it figured in a few hours and if parts were on hand. Fixed the same day.

    the rear tire is completely flat.
    Probably inner tube has a leak. Cheap to patch with a bicycle patch kit. But first. I would run my fingers along inner wall of tire to check and make sure nothing was poking the inner tube before remounting.
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