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  1. #1

    Is Linux right for me (am I in the right place) ????


    Hello.

    A while back I was posting some questions here when it finally dawned on me that I was out of my league.

    Well, nothing has changed since then. However....

    I may be headed the Linux direction anyway. Here's the deal:

    I'm currently using a MacBook Pro that I use for just about everything. In short, I like it and have been a Mac user for a long time now.

    Initially, my company had me using a PC Laptop, that has since been retired as the server for a remote two-person office. We tie into the Main offices via VPN where a server contains our data files managed in Microsoft Access. It works, but it is slow. Windows 7 has more security enriched features that make it somewhat cumbersome. We were thinking about downgrading to Microsoft Office 2003, to take use of a more streamlined, less enhanced (faster) database interchange. From the little I know, but what I can gather, it looks like there are more streamlined systems out there that would work not only better, but on my Mac as well. No doubt, the experts here can point me in the right direction. But this is what I'm thinking:

    Allocating a Linux partition on my Mac with Kexi? Do I know anything about either? -Absolutely not!
    However, I can take the time to learn the systems. This sounds a whole lot better than:

    a) dragging along two laptops (my mac and pc)

    b)spending the money on windows 7 (or 8 for that matter) and making a bootcamp partition on my Mac for it prior to installing MS Office.

    The other impression I have (right or wrong -i don't know), is that if the files are transferable from MS Access to Kexi, I get the added security that Linux brings to the picture. I realize that the data base would probably be replaced on the server as well. But I think this is a step in the right direction anyway.

    I hope I'm making sense.

    Thanks for reading
    Thanks for your patience!

  2. #2
    I think dual-booting w/Linux is definitely at least worth considering. I took a quick look at the latest Fedora release (17) and the package koffice-kexi (which I think is what you'd need) is in the development repo.

    One way you could go is booting with a Live version of the DVD and trying to play with kexi to see if it would work. To access the data on your MAC partition, you'd have to use the HFS filesystem. I'm not sure if F17 has that support built in, but just boot w/the DVD and try, I'd say. The mount command would be something like:

    Code:
    mount -t hfsplus /dev/sdc2 /mnt
    your partition is probably not sdc2, that is just an example.

  3. #3
    Thanks Atreyu!

    I appreciate the input! I'll start poking around. Sounds like the way to go -if only I can get my associate to look into it as well, as he's somewhat partial to windows....

    Koffice-Kexi from Fedora!

    I'll start playing!!!

    See you soon, as I'm sure to be back!

    thanks again


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  5. #4
    Linux Newbie SL6-A1000's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rhetro View Post
    Hello.

    A while back I was posting some questions here when it finally dawned on me that I was out of my league.

    Well, nothing has changed since then. However....

    I may be headed the Linux direction anyway. Here's the deal:

    I'm currently using a MacBook Pro that I use for just about everything. In short, I like it and have been a Mac user for a long time now.

    Initially, my company had me using a PC Laptop, that has since been retired as the server for a remote two-person office. We tie into the Main offices via VPN where a server contains our data files managed in Microsoft Access. It works, but it is slow. Windows 7 has more security enriched features that make it somewhat cumbersome. We were thinking about downgrading to Microsoft Office 2003, to take use of a more streamlined, less enhanced (faster) database interchange. From the little I know, but what I can gather, it looks like there are more streamlined systems out there that would work not only better, but on my Mac as well. No doubt, the experts here can point me in the right direction. But this is what I'm thinking:

    Allocating a Linux partition on my Mac with Kexi? Do I know anything about either? -Absolutely not!
    However, I can take the time to learn the systems. This sounds a whole lot better than:

    a) dragging along two laptops (my mac and pc)

    b)spending the money on windows 7 (or 8 for that matter) and making a bootcamp partition on my Mac for it prior to installing MS Office.

    The other impression I have (right or wrong -i don't know), is that if the files are transferable from MS Access to Kexi, I get the added security that Linux brings to the picture. I realize that the data base would probably be replaced on the server as well. But I think this is a step in the right direction anyway.

    I hope I'm making sense.

    Thanks for reading
    Thanks for your patience!
    First things first and your welcome to correct me if i am wrong. But kexi is a database manager, For things like MySQL and PostgreSQL?
    This is totally separate to partitions and getting a dual-boot system working. Kexi if my understanding is correct is software that is installed on the system after its up and running.

    So don't worry about kexi just yet. First if your going to give Linux a try, you need to decide which distro? which will be heavily based of your Mac's CPU: Is your mac PowerPC or an Intel design?

    I'd be hoping for an Intel to give you maximum Linux distro Options...

    As for partitioning the only thing you need to do before you start installing Linux is shrink your Mac partition down to give as much space as you want for Linux.
    If it was me i would let Linux override the MBR with the GRUB or the GRUB2 bootloader during install. It is a very versatile bootloader and will give you the least amount of hassles. Not too mention it is heavily used by Linux & other open-source distro's and thus a vast amount of information and support exists if your run into trouble.

    @Atreyu: It doesn't matter what Filesystem Linux is installed on. To read and write to a different filesystem Linux just needs the modules installed. In this case hfsutils hfsutils-tcltk hfsplus hfsprogs libhfsp0, easily installed at a later date...
    Last edited by SL6-A1000; 08-11-2012 at 02:35 AM.

  6. #5
    @Atreyu: It doesn't matter what Filesystem Linux is installed on. To read and write to a different filesystem Linux just needs the modules installed. In this case hfsutils hfsutils-tcltk hfsplus hfsprogs libhfsp0, easily installed at a later date...
    Yes, I see why that is confusing. What I should have said was, "you'd have to use the hfsplus filesystem in your mount command." I certainly did not mean to install Linux to an HFS formatted filesystem!

  7. #6
    -->
    Thanks SL6-A1000 and Atretyu!

    No problem..
    Still trying to get an idea of what can and can't be done.

    Yes, I'm looking to use Kexi to interact with Sql information in a data base that is using Access as a front-end to the SQL information. I'm trying to find an alternative to using windows 7 or 8, and use something more streamlined and secure. My understanding is that Kexi could work just fine, with Linux running the show underneath.
    Yes, I am running an Intel Macbook in 64bit. My concern would be with Kexi being as versatile as Access, where I could customize reports. I've seen some of the screenshots for Linux and I'm very impressed. I can still use the gui to customize buttons and what not. I suppose I'm rather working backwards. I need to know that Kexi will work first. If it won't , then there really isn't a need to bother with Linux. However, I have a feeling I'm going to be using it anyway. It has all the advantages that windows has without the clutter.

    I'll keep investigating!

    thanks for your help!

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