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Arch is transitioning to systemd and I'm in the process of switching - partly because the new systemd configuration files that are replacing rc.conf aren't quite compatible with initscripts and ...
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  1. #1
    Linux Engineer hazel's Avatar
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    Who else is using systemd?


    Arch is transitioning to systemd and I'm in the process of switching - partly because the new systemd configuration files that are replacing rc.conf aren't quite compatible with initscripts and I was getting garbage printed at startup. Not a serious problem but irritating.

    Switching hasn't been too problematic. The first time I booted, I was told I'd have to reconfigure my kernel to enable control groups, but I had a kernel rebuild scheduled for the next day anyway so that was all right. The second time, I only got to a command prompt. I had to enable my display manager. Third time it booted into the gui. I had a bit of trouble with syslog-ng but that was my own fault; you have to modify syslog-ng.conf to make it work with the systemd journal and I edited in a syntax error (as one does...)

    I think booting is faster than with sysvinit. Shutdown is frighteningly fast. Network configuration works out of the box; you're supposed to enable dhcp but so far I haven't had to. So on the whole I 'm pleased. But I'm not removing sysvinit until I've tested out a few more things.
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  2. #2
    oz
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    I've been slowly migrating to systemd as well. So far, no problems, but I'm taking my time with the move.
    oz

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    I am using systemd on 4 openSUSE x86_64 systems currently at 12.3 Milestone 0 and since 12.1.
    It took a bit of time to become familiar with it but it's perfectly OK.

    When I boot a newly built kernel I have to hit ESC and CTRL-ALT-F1 as it's booting in order to get a login VT prompt from grub2 to allow building the nvidia module.

    The best and most complete documentation I have seen is for Fedora - google on "Fedora systemd". The systemctl manpage is also helpful as is looking through the files and directories in /lib/systemd.

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    oz
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    For anyone (especially Arch Linux users) thinking about moving to systemd, one of the Arch developers has posted a nice note about the advantages of implementing it:

    https://bbs.archlinux.org/viewtopic....49530#p1149530

    There is also a nice article in the Arch wiki with instructions for making the move:

    https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Systemd
    Last edited by oz; 08-21-2012 at 05:18 PM. Reason: spell
    oz

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    Linux Engineer hazel's Avatar
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    Special thanks to Siddly and Oz. I have been using the Arch wiki as my main info source but it's very HOWTO oriented. The Fedora article gives a much better explanation on what is actually going on inside. You don't usually think about using docs from other distros. The blog mentioned by Oz is also very good.

    One annoyance is that systemd keeps trying to start up plymouth and auditd, neither of which I have (and I don't intend to install them either) but the Arch devs say that the unwanted plymouth dependencies will soon be removed
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    I've been using systemd for while (since whenever Fedora introduced it...15?) and I have no real complaints. There is the learning curve, of course: the SysVInit way of doing things was much easier to hack. This systemd architecture is still foggy to me. I know how to use sytemctl to control services now, but I'm still not very comfortable with popping the hood and tinkering. Still, it is much more streamlined, faster, and smarter, dependency-wise, than sysvinit. It is also clearly the way things are going, certainly for Fedora/Red Hat, and possibly others, so I'm putting a brave face on and trying to learn as I go...

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    Quote Originally Posted by hazel View Post
    Special thanks to Siddly and Oz. I have been using the Arch wiki as my main info source but it's very HOWTO oriented. The Fedora article gives a much better explanation on what is actually going on inside. You don't usually think about using docs from other distros. The blog mentioned by Oz is also very good.

    One annoyance is that systemd keeps trying to start up plymouth and auditd, neither of which I have (and I don't intend to install them either) but the Arch devs say that the unwanted plymouth dependencies will soon be removed
    I never restrict myself to the docs for a particular distro as often better insights are provided by another e.g when getting around a grub problem in openSUSE, Ubuntu provided the easiest route to follow and when trying to understand systemd, it was Fedora.
    Working with any distro at times it's a different distro that provides the solution.
    The distro don't only work behind the own walls, they look at what others are doing as it gives a better perspective especially when they are just starting out along a new route.

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    Linux Engineer hazel's Avatar
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    Yesterday I enabled cups.service. Today after booting I noticed that the cups daemon is running (ps ax|grep cups). I'm mildly surprised because I thought that systemd services don't actually start any daemons until their use is requested by another process. In fact that's why I enabled the service. Previously I launched cups explicitly when I want it because I very seldom do any printing and it's a waste of resources on an old computer to have unnecessary daemons running.

    Have I been misinformed?
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    That's what the docs say should happen but I see the same behaviour you describe.

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    Quote Originally Posted by hazel View Post
    Yesterday I enabled cups.service. Today after booting I noticed that the cups daemon is running (ps ax|grep cups). I'm mildly surprised because I thought that systemd services don't actually start any daemons until their use is requested by another process. In fact that's why I enabled the service. Previously I launched cups explicitly when I want it because I very seldom do any printing and it's a waste of resources on an old computer to have unnecessary daemons running.

    Have I been misinformed?
    Have you tried stopping it, and then seeing if it starts up by itself when you run a print command?

    of course, even if that works, it would seem to make sense if it then stopped itself again after you were done. that seems to be the point anyway.

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