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My work computer "died". At least according to the computer repair person they called in. Funny thing is that after they left I had a copy of System rescue, and ...
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  1. #1
    Linux Engineer MASONTX's Avatar
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    Linux to the rescue, but how?


    My work computer "died". At least according to the computer repair person they called in. Funny thing is that after they left I had a copy of System rescue, and it booted just fine. Hard drive passed all tests and so did ram. I also had a live cd of Zorin6 lite that I intended to try on my laptop that I keep at work, and it booted fine and the computer seems to function fine with it. Gparted reports sda2 Dell utilities/FAT32 and sda3/NTFS.
    I don't have the install disks from the Windows XP available, so how do I proceed to either 1) repair the friggin windows install, or 2) recover my firefox bookmarks (the only data I care about on the HD).
    System is a P4 single core processor with 2 GB ram and 80 GB HDD. Boot from HDD brings up the Win XP screen, but anything you click on either does nothing, or locks up the system requiring a hard reboot.
    I know this is not the windows support forum, but how can either Zorin 6 lite or system rescue 3.0 fix my problem. I could download some other linux product to my laptop and burn it if that would work better.
    Thanks for any help.
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  2. #2
    Super Moderator Roxoff's Avatar
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    If you have FUSE support for NTFS on your rescue disk, you should be able to read the hard drive. All you need then is a memory stick and a little understanding of how Firefox or Chrome (you were using one of these browsers, weren't you?) store their bookmark files. You can probably find that on t'Internet somewhere. The data is usually somewhere in C:\Documents and Settings\<username>\Application Data.
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  3. #3
    Linux Engineer MASONTX's Avatar
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    I got the HDD mounted and copied favorites/david, but it doesn't look right. In one of my favorites floders I have subfolders A, A1. B, B1, etc and what I copied just has A, B, etc. Well, at least I got something out of it.
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    Linux Engineer MASONTX's Avatar
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    I've been using the live linux cd for about 2 hours now, and the computer works fine, with linux. So much for the IT expert that says the computer is dead and needs to be replaced. I wasn't here when it died, or they stared working on it, so I don't know if they tried to reinstall windows or not, but since it works off the live linux cd, I doubt the problem is hardware related.
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  6. #5
    Super Moderator Roxoff's Avatar
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    Perhaps in the 'IT Expert's mind dead=too much hassle to fix. Perhaps you should give him a call if it's his responsibility to fix it, and ask him what exactly is wrong with it. Then when he tells you, ask him why all the hardware is working perfectly and he hasn't fixed your Windwos install. Then insist that he fixes it, as it's his job to?
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    Linux Engineer MASONTX's Avatar
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    As is often quoted, but I can't remember who said it, "You can't fix stupid." Last time we had a problem, (wireless not working) she spent 4 hours cleaning the registry and running anti-virus checkers, finally reinstalled windows. I asked her if she had power cycled the wireless router and was told that wasn't the problem, but after she spent hours "fixing things", she power cycled the router and it started working. Her report was that one of us had downloaded a virus on the internet and corrupted the OS, resulting in a memo prohibiting downloading anything on the work computer.
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  8. #7
    Super Moderator Roxoff's Avatar
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    You could always fire the request to her boss... if it's for work, and she's caused you problems before, then it'd be interesting to watch the system fall apart.
    Linux user #126863 - see http://linuxcounter.net/

  9. #8
    Linux Engineer MASONTX's Avatar
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    We live in a small town, and she is about the only "expert" that lives local. She is a one person computer service company, and contracts with different businesses to maintain their computers. Anyone else we call has to drive a couple of hours each way and is prohibitively expensive. In the long run, it is cheaper to buy a new computer than pay a real expert to drive in and fix an old one. Besides, as cheap as the county commissioners are, we would still be on 486's if the old ones hadn't "broken".
    Registered Linux user #526930

  10. #9
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    Then insist that he fixes it, as it's his job to?
    Being in the repair business, Motorcycles,not computers though I dabble. I get bikes that are torn apart and in a basket. The usual remark is, "well I took it here to this place, they tore it apart, Said they could not fix it or another one is, they want too much to fix this. How much would it cost for you to fix it?"

    I usually tell them, "5 to 10 times as much since you did not bring it to me first. I don't know what may be missing and needs to be replaced. Since I did not tear it down I have to figure out what goes where from scratch. It probably did not need to be tore down in the first place if I had trouble shot it."

    Usually the person is left with a $500.00+ bill from the place that tore it down and is now in parts in a box. Usually, I just tell em time to buy an new motorcycle. It is how I end up with basket cases eventually.

    So if the flake you call a computer tech says it is broke when it is not. That is all you need to know to run like hell away from them as far as you can before they screw up your gear even more and bill you for it. You won't be a happy camper if you leave it with them to fix it in the long run.

    "You can't fix stupid."
    Ron White, a fellow Texan is famous for that quote.

  11. #10
    Trusted Penguin Irithori's Avatar
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    Maybe my pov is too simple.
    But the year is 2012:
    remote login, remote management on both hardware and Os level are a reality,
    plus everyone and their uncle has their data in the cloud nowadays
    and bootstraping a client machine via pxe install is also understood since decades.

    Is there really need for on-premise desktop support?
    For now and in your case obviously yes, but it should be possible to change that if so desired.
    You must always face the curtain with a bow.

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