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+1 for Arch linux. If you've never set up a system like Arch or Gentoo, it might take a week to get everything working the way you want it. But ...
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  1. #11
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    +1 for Arch linux. If you've never set up a system like Arch or Gentoo, it might take a week to get everything working the way you want it. But it's well worth it.

  2. #12
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    It depends on the machine. If it's got enough resources I install Kubuntu. If Kubuntu is too much for the hardware I try Mepis. If Mepis won't fly I try Xubuntu. If Xubuntu is too much for the hardware I try Antix or Slitaz. Slitaz is less versatile than Antix but runs a bit faster and smoother on most hardware.

  3. #13
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    Tried Fedora 17 followed by Ubuntu:

    Quote Originally Posted by Eldergeek View Post
    It depends on the machine. If it's got enough resources I install Kubuntu. If Kubuntu is too much for the hardware I try Mepis. If Mepis won't fly I try Xubuntu. If Xubuntu is too much for the hardware I try Antix or Slitaz. Slitaz is less versatile than Antix but runs a bit faster and smoother on most hardware.
    I just built a new fancy high end PC with a Gigabyte GA-990FXA-UD7 Motherboard, 32GB of RAM, and two XFX 7870 Video Cards in CrossFire.

    I wanted to try Linux so I installed Fedora 17 because we used Fedora in two classes in college. Although I got video, it was not the video I expected. I quickly discovered that none of the video drivers for Linux would install without errors during the install. I discovered that Fedora 17 did not support my video cards.

    So, I installed Ubuntu 12.04 onto another hard drive and tried that one since it did say that it supported my video cards. At first I encountered the same issues but quickly found out that after 2 updates to the system that was very easy with a mouse click, the AMD support was in place, evidenced by the icons and entries under Video. What I had for icons in Win7 was now in my folder. What I am saying, the same software that is added in when installing the video cards in Win7 is not in place in Linux. I was not successful when I downloaded the Linux Driver Files, but it automatically appeared when I clicked on the Update from the drop down menu.

    I am used to installing drivers under Windows, but not very knowledgeable doing in Linux. So far, I find it far easier to let Ubuntu do the updating and fixing of things, as a newbie that is. Same goes for the older HP 1100 Laser Jet Printer that is monochrome. I had trouble getting it to work at first under Linux, but when I bought the new printer cable with a Mini-Centronics on one end (as that is what the printer uses) and USB on the other end, instead of the parallel on both ends, and connected it, then updated and rebooted, presto, the printer was now installed and working. I had to go this way because there is no Parallel Port on my new PC build.

    I do not know why I seem to have so much trouble when I download the Linux Drivers and try the auto-install method, but I do know that just connecting the devices and relying on the Update feature in Linux seems to work in the long run, although it may not be immediate, the Update Feature seems to work in detecting and installing new drivers during this System Update feature. I just wished I knew more about driver updates and could find nice step by step instructions in how to update and install drivers in Linux, which seems to be lacking in searching for this particular subject matter.

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  5. #14
    Linux Newbie Charles4809's Avatar
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    If you want to try something real fast I would say BodhiLinux. The enlightenment desktop is astonishing. Only very basic applications are included by default, making it a fast and lightweight install. But Ubuntu Repos are available, as well as the distros own, so adding software is no problem at all.
    Charles
    ASUS EEE Box B202, Atom 270 1,6GHz, 1 GB, HDD 80GB, XP-SP3 / PinguyOS
    Asus EEE PC 901 with Bodhi-Linux

  6. #15
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    #1 TinyCore: really fast, and is lightweight... Add WiFi, Chrome, games, etc. from their repository.
    Ideal for laptops. Easy to setup multi-boot with XP.

    #2 Semplice: really fast, and is lightweight... WiFi, Chrome, etc is included. Games must be added.
    Not suitable for old machines.

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