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My first distro was ubuntu 10.04 which was perfect in every way i wanted. Then unity made me search for other distros. After using a lot(10-15) of distros ,now I ...
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  1. #1
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    Help me decide on a linux distro


    My first distro was ubuntu 10.04 which was perfect in every way i wanted. Then unity made me search for other distros. After using a lot(10-15) of distros ,now I am using Mint 13 Cinnamon and am still in the search for a perfect distro. Every distro seems to have an allergy towards a software/WM.

    I am all about eye candy and need the following softwares to run flawlessly:
    Compiz
    Cairo Dock
    Conky
    Screenlets

    Please suggest me a distro.

  2. #2
    Administrator MikeTbob's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by getanshub4u View Post
    My first distro was ubuntu 10.04 which was perfect in every way i wanted. Then unity made me search for other distros. After using a lot(10-15) of distros ,now I am using Mint 13 Cinnamon and am still in the search for a perfect distro. Every distro seems to have an allergy towards a software/WM.

    I am all about eye candy and need the following softwares to run flawlessly:
    Compiz
    Cairo Dock
    Conky
    Screenlets

    Please suggest me a distro.
    Welcome to the Forums.
    I'd say Sabayon. It's based on Gentoo, which makes it "Somewhat Difficult" for newbies. It has all the Eyecandy you need though.
    You can also check this distro quiz and see where it lands you.
    zegenie Studios Linux Distribution Chooser
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    Administrator jayd512's Avatar
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    Hello and Welcome!

    Before the reply from Mike, I was already thinking Sabayon.
    It's geared for two things... eye-candy. And more eye-candy.
    I've not installed it, but while playing with the LiveCD, I was really impressed.
    Jay

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    Tried Sabayon and Chakra too.But I felt uncomfortable with the package management.
    Would prefer a debian based distro although I am all ears for others too.

  5. #5
    oz
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    Quote Originally Posted by getanshub4u View Post
    now I am using Mint 13 Cinnamon and am still in the search for a perfect distro.
    Hello and welcome aboard!

    So far as I know, there isn't a "perfect distro", or else everyone would be using it. I've been using Linux for more than 12 years now and during that time have tried countless different distros, new releases, desktop environments, and windows managers, and not once have I ever felt that any of them were perfect. They each have their own issues and annoyances, so you have to continue on testing different options until you find whatever is the most suitable for your own operating system tastes, and what works best with your current hardware.

    I'd recommend starting at the top of the hits-per-day-chart found at DistroWatch.com and work your way down the listing until you find something that works well enough for your needs. If none of them fits you and your hardware, there are plenty of other distros that aren't listed there.

    All the above said, I still find Linux far less annoying to use than any version of Windows that I've tried and that would be all of them, except for Vista and the upcoming Windows 8.

    Good luck with your search efforts and let us know if you find something that works out for you....
    oz

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    Quote Originally Posted by getanshub4u View Post
    Tried Sabayon and Chakra too.But I felt uncomfortable with the package management.
    Would prefer a debian based distro although I am all ears for others too.
    Are you expecting the distribution you select to already contain absolutely everything you could possibly want, or are you more inclined to choose a distribution that readily allows you, or even expects you, to set it up the way you want? The Ubuntu, Mint, and SUSE class of systems are configured, and yes, they allow you to change things, but they do not provide, other than the packaging tools (which are very easy), a lot of other tools with which you can set up a custom distribution.

    I mentioned Ubuntu, Mint, and SUSE in this class. But in the greater scheme of things, there are enough facilities and tools, while not directly included in the main distributions, certainly DO provide enough, as we've seen with the great number of variations, to build whatever you want. More than that, Ubuntu, SUSE, and Fedora, in particular, have "Studio" and other tools and infrastructures that are making it increasingly easier, at least for hobbyists, to roll their own, grow their own, or build their own customized system. Not only that, but with the very inexpensive capability of external USB devices, as well as solid state devices (SSD), there has been a growth of systems that can be rapidly built, configured, and deployed, using fast access devices and/or easily removable devices.

    If you are expecting a distribution, as is, to be exactly what you want, the only ways to get there are either to become an active developer, or at the very least, an active tester and contributor of ideas.

    That is what I've done with a few distributions, SimplyMEPIS and antiX in particular. In the case of SimplyMEPIS, I like it as a stable, easy to use system that I can effortlessly install. With a Debian-backed software archive repository, it has plenty of software, if I choose to further add to it, plus the MEPIS Lovers Forum has a strong community that creates, tests, and makes available software in between releases. The antiX distribution is a more fluid variation of MEPIS. It allows and encourages more easy choices, such as the choice between Stable, Testing, and Unstable Debian packages, the use of smxi, a system administration tool that eases package selection, graphics driver modifications, and overall system management and configuration. Moreover, antiX has three distinct approaches, all of which begin with relatively modest system requirements: a full version, which is complete, but uses much lighter desktops and applications than mainstream distributions, lighter than MEPIS, in fact. Then there is a base version, which includes a graphical user environment, but excludes most applications, instead providing tools to make it easier for you to make your own package and application selections. Finally, there is a core version, which provides only the system kernel, core utilities, and tools that allow you to almost entirely roll your own system. All of these alternatives are backed by a solid, helpful forum of like-minded people, who are eager and willing to share their own thoughts and help others to create the system that appeals to them most.

    There are some Conky configurations included with antiX, and the distribution wisely and readiy uses some of the best tools from several of the best lightweight systems, including tools from Absolute Linux, Puppy, siduction, and its parent, MEPIS. If you want to make the perfect system and are willing to put modest effort into it yourself, but don't want to spend countless hours doing it, then antiX makes more sense than Arch or Gentoo. Those system give you complete control, but they can consume hours, even days, initially, to get things set up the way you want them. With antiX full or base, you can get a functional system in anywhere from five minutes to a half hour, then you can take your time turning it into that perfect system. With antiX core, it takes a bit more personal effort, though for me, I've created some tutorials and helped others create their own customized system in under an hour.

    The antiX distribution isn't the only way to go; it is a trade off between complete control and ease of use; it falls slightly short in each; Gentoo or Linux from Scratch certainly give you more complete control, as does Arch, but they require more personal effort. The antiX approach requires a moderate effort to make the system "perfect" for your needs, but a very nominal amount of effort to get something solid and easy to work with. It's just a bit more complex to use than MEPIS or Ubuntu, though not unreasonably so. A first time installer might have many questions; a veteran, however, could literally "cruise with it" within minutes. It can be initially run live, then installed. It can also be used with what is known as persistence; for those who know about that, you can run off CD, DVD, or USB, save a persistent state on a hard drive or USB, and have a fast, flexible environment, one that can be later installed on disk as well.

    Not the only way to go, but for me, it's been a way to get that system which does everything that I want it to do, and I can set it up that way with only a moderate amount of effort, using skills that I've developed over the years, and it is a Debian-based system.
    Brian Masinick
    masinick AT yahoo DOT com

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    Tried AriOS 4 and it seems very promising.
    Will try AntiX too.Lets see where the journey stops.

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