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Originally Posted by Rupadhya I agree with WHS. Mint is easier, as it contains software that Fedora won't distribute as it violates the free/GNU philosophy. I am particularly thinking about ...
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  1. #81
    Linux Newbie Syndacate's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rupadhya View Post
    I agree with WHS. Mint is easier, as it contains software that Fedora won't distribute as it violates the free/GNU philosophy. I am particularly thinking about MP3 playing and manipulation, which I am pretty sure comes with Mint.

    I think the key is to start using any Linux distro and take notes. Initially, I had a spiral notebook which notated what changes I made to the base OS.

    Now, I keep a simple file in my home directory, with instructions of changes I have made. Every 6 months Fedora comes out with a new release and I re-install to clean up my hard drive. You can upgrade using different tools, but I like the challenge of rebuilding. The Fedora way is called 'Fed Up'. I am not sure what you do for Mint.

    I also have scripts that back up my data (not applications or Operating System) to another drive/computer. That way, If I have a catastrophic problem, I can recover. You might be able to do that with Windows, but I am not sure how to just backup data, not the applications.

    There have been a few occasions where I had to recover a file. I am glad it is now automatic, so I don't have to think about it.

    - Raj
    Good to know I'm not crazy. I do the same EXACT thing, but with Ubuntu...right down to the flat text file in my home directory. That, and I don't leave instructions, I just note the changes, orig values, etc. That reminds me, I have to merge my scrollbar changes into that file...they're currently in another file >.<.

    The video codecs are more of an issue than MP3, IMO. Though in Ubuntu they're one-click away, and in Mint I believe they come pre-packaged IIRC. Though they're not exactly hard to get in Fedora, either. I like Ubuntu more due to the support, especially if somebody is learning...but I like Mint more because of its direction. Right now have 12.10, will probably upgrade to 13.04 when I get the disk space...but I'm not going back to Mint until after my project is done, don't want to risk that large of a change :-\.

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    Just Joined! Rupadhya's Avatar
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    Both Ubuntu and Mint have a Live CD/USB option, so you can test it out before you install it to your hard drive.

    If you are really crazy , you can get as many distros as you want and install them to a single USB drive using www pendrivelinux com.

    You will probably do that for about a week, and then lock in on one that you like.

    - Raj Upadhyaya

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    Linux Guru Lazydog's Avatar
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    I have recently install Sabayon and I am very pleased with it. It doesn't seem complicated at all and updating is is easy. One thing I have found they do differently then RH/CentOS/Fedora is you need to purposely upgrade the kernel and I like this.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lazydog View Post
    I have recently install Sabayon and I am very pleased with it. It doesn't seem complicated at all and updating is is easy. One thing I have found they do differently then RH/CentOS/Fedora is you need to purposely upgrade the kernel and I like this.
    I haven't touched Sabayon since wayyyy back when when it only offered fluxbox. Wasn't too fond of it then, how's it working as a daily OS, now?

    Not sure I could move away from Ubuntu base, way too much support. I don't have the time to be messing with stupid issues in my daily OS...so I worry about support when other distros come into question.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lazydog View Post
    I have recently install Sabayon and I am very pleased with it. It doesn't seem complicated at all and updating is is easy. One thing I have found they do differently then RH/CentOS/Fedora is you need to purposely upgrade the kernel and I like this.
    that is interesting. i know that there is a yum configuration option that allows you to specify packages that should NEVER be upgraded. for example, in yum.conf you could put:

    Code:
    exclude=kernel*
    or just from the cmd line:
    Code:
    yum –exclude=kernel* ...
    so that could give you the same effect in RHEL/Fedora/CentOS, etc.

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    Administrator jayd512's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by atreyu View Post
    that is interesting. i know that there is a yum configuration option that allows you to specify packages that should NEVER be upgraded. for example, in yum.conf you could put:

    Code:
    exclude=kernel*
    or just from the cmd line:
    Code:
    yum –exclude=kernel* ...
    so that could give you the same effect in RHEL/Fedora/CentOS, etc.
    I remember doing something like that when I was running Fedora. It only happened once, but a kernel upgrade bit my butt hard!
    Jay

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    It was "MCC Interim Linux" (it was a floppy disk set based (it has sets of disk such as A, not a distro as seen today) back in 1992. I had installed quite a few times before the first cd distro in 1995, which I did buy (Yggdrasil) as it was cheaper than buying the needed 3.5 inch floppies at the time. My favorite distro to run us Gentoo (but you really need to know how stuff works as it does not have an installer).

  8. #88
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    Quote Originally Posted by alf55 View Post
    It was "MCC Interim Linux"
    so your first Linux distribution was the first Linux distribution...nice, alf55!

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    Linux Guru Lazydog's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Syndacate View Post
    I haven't touched Sabayon since wayyyy back when when it only offered fluxbox. Wasn't too fond of it then, how's it working as a daily OS, now?

    Not sure I could move away from Ubuntu base, way too much support. I don't have the time to be messing with stupid issues in my daily OS...so I worry about support when other distros come into question.
    I am really liking it as a desktop and would recommend it to others as a desktop. I have not tried the server side of the house yet as I am happy withn CentOS doing this job.

    Quote Originally Posted by atreyu View Post
    that is interesting. i know that there is a yum configuration option that allows you to specify packages that should NEVER be upgraded.
    Yes, I know about this. I was just surprised that you had to manually update/upgrade the kernel in Sabyon.

    Quote Originally Posted by jayd512 View Post
    I remember doing something like that when I was running Fedora. It only happened once, but a kernel upgrade bit my butt hard!
    Those were the day.... getting bit in the butt when you were not expecting it.

    Regards
    Robert

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lazydog View Post
    I am really liking it as a desktop and would recommend it to others as a desktop. I have not tried the server side of the house yet as I am happy withn CentOS doing this job.
    What would you say is the main advantage or pro to using it? Also, how is the community support?

    I don't necessarily agree with the whole "it's compiled for your computer, therefore it's best" mindset with Gentoo and friends, pretty much as long as it's ELF on x86 I don't see how anybody would notice a difference, that used to be Gentoo's huge claim to fame, haven't looked at it in awhile.

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