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I need write a driver to connect the rfid reader to linux environment through USB and then detect the tags. As i am new to linux device drivers, could anyone ...
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  1. #1
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    Question how to write USB device driver for RFID


    I need write a driver to connect the rfid reader to linux environment through USB and then detect the tags. As i am new to linux device drivers, could anyone please suggest from where should i start. I know few basics about character drivers.

    Once done i am planning to port it to android platform. Can it be done?

  2. #2
    Trusted Penguin Irithori's Avatar
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    Hi and welcome

    While I have no personal experience in that area, this project might be a start for you:
    OpenBeacon Active RFID Project - OpenBeacon
    You must always face the curtain with a bow.

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    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by samimanchnda View Post
    I need write a driver to connect the rfid reader to linux environment through USB and then detect the tags. As i am new to linux device drivers, could anyone please suggest from where should i start. I know few basics about character drivers.

    Once done i am planning to port it to android platform. Can it be done?
    Well, Android is basically LInux with some extra front-end cruft. The biggest issue is getting it installed on Android without going through the Android App Store, which usually requires that the application be signed and coded with Darvik (a Java JVM clone).
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rubberman View Post
    The biggest issue is getting it installed on Android without going through the Android App Store, which usually requires that the application be signed and coded with Darvik (a Java JVM clone).
    Not at all, the philosophy behind Android is that everything is open. Anyone can write code with the SDK and run it on an unmodified phone (other than enabling "unknown sources" in the settings).

    Custom kernels requires an unlocked bootloader but you can still compile and use kernel modules if you have root access (also known as "rooted" devices). The manufacturer has to provide the kernel sources as per GPLv2 so that shouldn't be an issue either.

    There's even one project that implements a USB WiFi dongle in userspace on Android, which means that it runs on any phone with USB OTG, Android 3+ and "unknown sources" enabled.

    I think it's definitely possible, especially in your case since Google used USB RFID readers to first demonstrate the NFC API in Android 3.0 (running on a Motorola Xoom). You can probably find the keynote on YouTube, if only I could remember what year it was... 2011 maybe?

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    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Djhg2000 View Post
    Not at all, the philosophy behind Android is that everything is open. Anyone can write code with the SDK and run it on an unmodified phone (other than enabling "unknown sources" in the settings).

    Custom kernels requires an unlocked bootloader but you can still compile and use kernel modules if you have root access (also known as "rooted" devices). The manufacturer has to provide the kernel sources as per GPLv2 so that shouldn't be an issue either.

    There's even one project that implements a USB WiFi dongle in userspace on Android, which means that it runs on any phone with USB OTG, Android 3+ and "unknown sources" enabled.

    I think it's definitely possible, especially in your case since Google used USB RFID readers to first demonstrate the NFC API in Android 3.0 (running on a Motorola Xoom). You can probably find the keynote on YouTube, if only I could remember what year it was... 2011 maybe?
    Good point, but the phone still has to either be unlocked or rooted to install custom software, at least as far as I can tell. My Nexus One is unlocked and rooted so I don't have a problem installing new software on it, but that is not always the case, although it is not hard to do.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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    Linux Enthusiast gruven's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rubberman View Post
    Good point, but the phone still has to either be unlocked or rooted to install custom software, at least as far as I can tell. My Nexus One is unlocked and rooted so I don't have a problem installing new software on it, but that is not always the case, although it is not hard to do.
    Every android phone that I have used had an option to "sideload" apps, whether they were signed or not, without being rooted or unlocked. It is in the settings somewhere.

    Linux User #376741
    Code is Poetry

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    Linux Device Drivers

    Quote Originally Posted by samimanchnda View Post
    I need write a driver to connect the rfid reader to linux environment through USB and then detect the tags. As i am new to linux device drivers, could anyone please suggest from where should i start. I know few basics about character drivers.

    Once done i am planning to port it to android platform. Can it be done?
    You should try to contact Greg Kroah-Hartman.
    He is the main man for linux drivers.
    At one point he had a policy that if you needed a driver written for linux he would find someone to write it for free.
    I am not sure if that still holds though. maybe.
    he has also given talks on how to write device drivers for linux at such places as OSCON.
    You could try the 'lmkl' linux kernel mailing list and other 'chat' channels to see if you can fing GKH's email that way.
    pgmer6809

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