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I believe some LF members might find this link amusing: Top 10 Most Expensive Car Crashes...
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  1. #1
    Linux Enthusiast cousinlucky's Avatar
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    10 Expensive Car Crashes!!


    I believe some LF members might find this link amusing:
    Top 10 Most Expensive Car Crashes
    PCLinuxOS Gnome and PCLinuxOS Mate
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    You Should Not Give In To Evils, But Proceed Ever More Boldly Against Them!! -from book six of Virgil's Aeneid
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  2. #2
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cousinlucky View Post
    I believe some LF members might find this link amusing:
    Top 10 Most Expensive Car Crashes
    Neat! A good segue to a conversation I had with my office mate today about exotic super cars... FWIW, my cousin (an architect) collects vintage Ferrari's - he showed up at my dad's memorial service in a mint 250LM... I can't really complain though. When I was a driving teenager, he took me down to the race course in Colorado Springs (Castle Rock actually) to teach me competition driving, in his Jag XKE. After a couple of hours doing donuts and controlled (more or less) slides on the skid pad, we did several laps on the road track so I could learn proper heel-and-toe shift techniques when hitting a hard turn at 100mph! I'm proud to say that I didn't spin out even once! A few years later when I had my own garage I was a serious rally and autocross driver. In the late 50's my cousin was a national SCCA champion, so he was well qualified to teach me the rudiments of performance driving.

    That said, over-powered cars and wet roads are a recipe for disaster!
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  3. #3
    Linux Newbie Syndacate's Avatar
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    Sad to see that Zonda and F1 in particular. Though a good list none-the-less.

    Quote Originally Posted by Rubberman View Post
    Neat! A good segue to a conversation I had with my office mate today about exotic super cars... FWIW, my cousin (an architect) collects vintage Ferrari's - he showed up at my dad's memorial service in a mint 250LM... I can't really complain though. When I was a driving teenager, he took me down to the race course in Colorado Springs (Castle Rock actually) to teach me competition driving, in his Jag XKE. After a couple of hours doing donuts and controlled (more or less) slides on the skid pad, we did several laps on the road track so I could learn proper heel-and-toe shift techniques when hitting a hard turn at 100mph! I'm proud to say that I didn't spin out even once! A few years later when I had my own garage I was a serious rally and autocross driver. In the late 50's my cousin was a national SCCA champion, so he was well qualified to teach me the rudiments of performance driving.

    That said, over-powered cars and wet roads are a recipe for disaster!
    You ever do any SCCA racing? I got into it relatively recently and am hooked (but also low on time). Hoping to make it to nats for GS competition, but have a pretty good ways to go, yet.

  4. #4
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Syndacate View Post
    Sad to see that Zonda and F1 in particular. Though a good list none-the-less.

    You ever do any SCCA racing? I got into it relatively recently and am hooked (but also low on time). Hoping to make it to nats for GS competition, but have a pretty good ways to go, yet.
    I was a member back in the 70's and 80's, mostly high-speed road rally stuff. I and a friend even designed and built a rally computer. That was my first bit of embedded systems programming - debugging 8008 assembler code for the time/distance calculations and led display output (this was in 1979 or so). Our prototype was wire-wrapped with an 8048 processor (8008 w/ EEPROM).
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  5. #5
    Linux Newbie Syndacate's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rubberman View Post
    I was a member back in the 70's and 80's, mostly high-speed road rally stuff. I and a friend even designed and built a rally computer. That was my first bit of embedded systems programming - debugging 8008 assembler code for the time/distance calculations and led display output (this was in 1979 or so). Our prototype was wire-wrapped with an 8048 processor (8008 w/ EEPROM).
    Ha, nice, I want to get into EMS prog. I'm interested in the tuning aspect from a high level perspective as well as the systems prog. aspect from a low level perspective.

  6. #6
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Syndacate View Post
    Ha, nice, I want to get into EMS prog. I'm interested in the tuning aspect from a high level perspective as well as the systems prog. aspect from a low level perspective.
    What do you mean by EMS? To some (I was an EMT once) it can mean Emergency Medical Systems. To others, here is what the Wikipedia says about the meaning of EMS: EMS - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    As for systems tuning and low-level systems programming, I have done all that. You can view my profile and see what I mean! So, these days you can get a nice little ARM board for under $50 that runs Linux (Raspberry PI and others) and use that to learn on! I got a nice ARM PC-104 embedded system for prototyping systems that also runs Linux, but it has tonnes of I/O, and I have added both an A/D I/O board as well as a relay board - I use it to design control systems for warehousing (conveyor and material handling controls) and manufacturing systems. It was a bit more expensive, especially with the add-ons - about $500 altogether. I also use it to teach embedded Linux programming to IEEE members.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  7. #7
    Linux Newbie Syndacate's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rubberman View Post
    What do you mean by EMS? To some (I was an EMT once) it can mean Emergency Medical Systems. To others, here is what the Wikipedia says about the meaning of EMS: EMS - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    As for systems tuning and low-level systems programming, I have done all that. You can view my profile and see what I mean! So, these days you can get a nice little ARM board for under $50 that runs Linux (Raspberry PI and others) and use that to learn on! I got a nice ARM PC-104 embedded system for prototyping systems that also runs Linux, but it has tonnes of I/O, and I have added both an A/D I/O board as well as a relay board - I use it to design control systems for warehousing (conveyor and material handling controls) and manufacturing systems. It was a bit more expensive, especially with the add-ons - about $500 altogether. I also use it to teach embedded Linux programming to IEEE members.
    EMS = Engine Management System. AKA. ECU, PCM, 'Computer', etc. Mostly used for managing EFI & timing on newer cars.

    I haven't looked exactly exactly what I'd need in terms of GIO (on average), but it sounds like that PC-104 would make the cut. Not sure if there's an OS written on them or not. My guess would be 'no', but who knows. It does seem a bit expensive, but who knows, can always start off smaller then port if need be!

  8. #8
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Well, if you are interested in automotive control systems, check out QNX (now the OS for the new Blackberry 10 systems). They've been big into such for a long time, and are (in my opinion) the best distributed real-time OS around, since about 1981-1982. FWIW, I have serial number 004... It is a fully posix-compliant OS - normally I can take Unix/Linux code and just recompile it - they support the full GCC suite, and were the originators of the Eclipse C tools. Good folks - great OS, and if you need HARD real-time, then they are the go-to people! Go here for more information: QNX operating systems, development tools, and professional services for connected embedded systems
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  9. #9
    Linux Newbie Syndacate's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rubberman View Post
    Well, if you are interested in automotive control systems, check out QNX (now the OS for the new Blackberry 10 systems). They've been big into such for a long time, and are (in my opinion) the best distributed real-time OS around, since about 1981-1982. FWIW, I have serial number 004... It is a fully posix-compliant OS - normally I can take Unix/Linux code and just recompile it - they support the full GCC suite, and were the originators of the Eclipse C tools. Good folks - great OS, and if you need HARD real-time, then they are the go-to people! Go here for more information: QNX operating systems, development tools, and professional services for connected embedded systems
    Yeah, dealt slightly with QnX when I was interning at a defense company for RTOS devices...never sys programming, though, just stuff on top of it. Def. a big player in the RTOS game. Friend has a lot of experiences with them too from a bunch of RTOS projects he did. Yeah, running that may be a good idea. Not sure if EMS's typically use an SOC or FFP or what. That's something I'll have to look into when I actually have time to start any projects like this :-\.

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