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There are many books on Linux. All the ones I have seen are HOWTO books and usually distro-specific. They tend to have names like Red Hat Unleashed, Fedora for Dummies ...
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  1. #1
    Linux Engineer hazel's Avatar
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    I have an idea for a book


    There are many books on Linux. All the ones I have seen are HOWTO books and usually distro-specific. They tend to have names like Red Hat Unleashed, Fedora for Dummies and Idiot's Guide to Ubuntu. The only book I know that is about Linux as such is the wonderful Running Linux. But that too is a HOWTO.

    I would like there to be a book that describes the "taste" of Linux, how it works, how and why it is actually different from Windows and what it is like running it. So for example there would be chapters on the philosophy of free software and how it generates this community, on how Linux handles your hardware (one integrated kernel versus a chaos of separate drivers), how file ownership and permissions work, how the X server cooperates with a variety of window managers to create a variety of desktops, the completely different way Linux handles software installation and upgrading...

    I'm going to try to append a summary (not easy using Links - I may have to re-edit with Midori) of what I have in mind. But I would like it to be a co-operative endeavour. Would anyone here be interested in working on such a book?
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    "I'm just a little old lady; don't try to dazzle me with jargon!"

  2. #2
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    Maybe but X is from 1984 wich pre-dates Microsoft's windows, so how can "X-server and a window manager cooperate to create a Windows-like graphical" this be true?

    Linux has a three tier permissions. These are user (or owner), group (or group ownership), and others. This are used to determine the access rights to a file or a directory. An example of this is like living in a large apartment complex (at least in the states) where you get a key that lets you into:
    • Your apartment (user permissions)
    • The building that contains your apartment (group)
    • The game room, workout room, pool, etc (a bigger group)
    • Access to the office is controlled but the permissions allow all access (other)

    Also ACL can be added to files (but most of the time a group can be created so they need not be deleted.

    Linux is patterned on Unix which has it origins from the late 60s at Bell Labs and was free for the asking until the MA-BELL breakup (ATT signed a deal that non-phone stuff would be available to anyone asking to stay a monopoly and that became void with the break-up).

    I remember version 9 of X added colors (254 plus white and black) was released in 1985 and we are currently at version 11 (the major version is the protocol version).

    KDE was a free version of CDE (Comming Desktop Environment --- SunSoft, HP, IBM and USL(Unix System Laboratories)) and not something that is like Microsoft as many think.

    Gnome was created as KDE was using QT which was not (at the time) open sourced.

  3. #3
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    The Idea is a great one. I could not help write it as I do history and computers not English.

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