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Have you noticed how good Plug 'n' Play is with devices in Linux these days? I tried a few distros on a spare machine the other day and they all ...
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  1. #1
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    PnP so good in Linux these days


    Have you noticed how good Plug 'n' Play is with devices in Linux these days?

    I tried a few distros on a spare machine the other day and they all recognised some fairly random hardware including USB sound cards (2 different ones). I was so impressed - the live CDs gave me full graphical and sonic experiences - dual network cards recognised and running and probably the strangest thing - USB 3G dongle - plug it in, it connects in a few seconds without any software being installed. On Windows, it takes 5 minutes to install this huge slow applications which drops the connection every 10 minutes. I found that after 1 working day, the Windows .exe for the dongle was using 1.2 GB of RAM! Linux treats it like it is just a piece of hardware and gives you a solid connection all day long. This is just bizarre because the dongle was designed for Windows and has no specific Linux drivers apparently!

    Amazing stuff, but Linux just gets better at such a speed that looking back, Windows and OSX are looking seriously out of touch with the needs of technology users!
    DonQuixoteMC likes this.

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    Just Joined! DonQuixoteMC's Avatar
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    I too was impressed by that! I was fearing the worst when I first booted up a LiveUSB, but everything worked flawlessly. I guess that dispels a lot of the old warnings about Linux incompatibilities

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    Absolutely - as an on-and-off Linux user for quite a few years and having to use Windows and OS X regularly for work, I certainly have plenty of reference points and I feel that so much work has been done in the Linux community that it is probably taken for granted now, but coming back and seeing how easy it is to install, the hardware compatibility is excellent, not passable, not good, but excellent. I have many machines now with various flavors of Windows and a Mac along with a couple of Linux machines - all machines suffer from either only being able to work with older devices or newer devices or a random selection. My Ubuntu box is the only one that is still compatible with every single piece of hardware (all manner of peripherals that I have collected over the years). True story!

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    The whole point of proprietary software is to make as much money as possible. When the software is tied to the hardware or you supply hardware manufacturers with your software, it is in no-ones best interest to continue supporting older hardware. No one who matters anyway. Screw the end user. Release your software when it is good enough, with what hardware support you think you can get away with. Then keep selling it (with patches) for as many years as you can.

    Open source on the other hand, doesn't have the same pressure. The pace of change is a lot quicker and for the most part, backwards compatibility is maintained. Linux and open source isn't completely immune from no longer supporting older hardware. The kernel recently dropped support for the 386 processor!
    What do we want?
    Time machines!

    When do we want 'em?
    Doesn't really matter does it!?


    The Fifth Continent

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