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Today for the second time this week I got an unsolicited phone call offering me a free boiler. There's no such thing as a free lunch so what are these ...
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  1. #1
    Linux Engineer hazel's Avatar
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    This has to be a scam, but how does it work?


    Today for the second time this week I got an unsolicited phone call offering me a free boiler. There's no such thing as a free lunch so what are these people playing at?
    "I'm just a little old lady; don't try to dazzle me with jargon!"
    www.hrussman.entadsl.com

  2. #2
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hazel View Post
    Today for the second time this week I got an unsolicited phone call offering me a free boiler. There's no such thing as a free lunch so what are these people playing at?
    I think they are playing the game of "Let's relieve that little old lady of some of her hard-earned cash."! I just say, when I get calls like this something on the order of "I don't take telephone solicitations of any sort! Please put me on your do-not-call list!" and then I just hang up.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  3. #3
    Linux Enthusiast cousinlucky's Avatar
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    A word Hazel, please! These people already have your phone number. Here in New York City we have *69 on the telephone which will tell you the number of your last incoming call. I get the number and file a harassment complaint at the police station. Sometimes I will ask for their mailing address , or name, or what company that they represent all for the purpose of legal action.
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  4. #4
    Penguin of trust elija's Avatar
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    They may be talking about this grant scheme. Although I would do my own leg work rather than trust a cold calling company.
    What do we want?
    Time machines!

    When do we want 'em?
    Doesn't really matter does it!?


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  5. #5
    Linux Engineer hazel's Avatar
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    Obviously someone wants to part me from my money! What I'd like to know is how they go about doing it. How does this scam work?

    Lucky, in this country people can hide their telephone number when they ring someone for nefarious purposes. Then if you use 1471 (which is the code for picking up the number of your last call), all you are told is that the caller did not reveal his number. I've tried it with cold callers once or twice and that's always the answer you get.
    "I'm just a little old lady; don't try to dazzle me with jargon!"
    www.hrussman.entadsl.com

  6. #6
    Penguin of trust elija's Avatar
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    A lot of these are not scams but I am not saying your contact wasn't. The way it works is this:

    • Find a government domestic grant.
    • Set up a company and website offering the service of getting the grant for a fee.
    • Buy a phone list.
    • Phone enough people to offer the service and you'll get takers. Maybe try a hard sell.
    • Deliver the service to those who want it.


    This is not a scam as the service is delivered, however the service offered can often be completed for free, by yourself and in less than ten minutes. To stop most unsolicited calls, sign up to the telephone preference service.
    What do we want?
    Time machines!

    When do we want 'em?
    Doesn't really matter does it!?


    The Fifth Continent

  7. #7
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Elija makes some good points Hazel. However, those less ethically endowed can also:

    • set up a company and website
    • buy a phone list
    • phone enough people to offer a non-existent or dubious (but existing) service to get takers.
    • deliver the "service" or product to those who bite.


    I was the victim of such a scam once, about 25 years ago. They delivered the "products" I paid for, but the terms for the "bait" that I wanted to get (free trip to somewhere exotic for me and wife) were just so onerous that it just wasn't worth it. So, I ended up with a closet full of cruft I didn't want or need, and they fulfilled their "promises" to the letter, at least to where it would not behoove me to file a complaint with authorities.

    This is why I NEVER respond to these calls. I simply say "I don't take telephone solicitations of ANY sort! Please put me on your do-not-call list." and hang up.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  8. #8
    Linux Engineer hazel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by elija View Post
    A lot of these are not scams but I am not saying your contact wasn't. The way it works is this:

    • Find a government domestic grant.
    • Set up a company and website offering the service of getting the grant for a fee.
    • Buy a phone list.
    • Phone enough people to offer the service and you'll get takers. Maybe try a hard sell.
    • Deliver the service to those who want it.

    That sounds exactly like the Payment Protection Insurance scam, where they get you compensation for PPI mis-selling but then claim most of it as their fee, when you could have applied for compensation directly without paying a penny.
    "I'm just a little old lady; don't try to dazzle me with jargon!"
    www.hrussman.entadsl.com

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