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Well, I finally made it! Of course I can't actually do anything with it because there are no apps (they get added in blfs). But it boots, I can log ...
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  1. #1
    Linux Engineer hazel's Avatar
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    LFS boots!


    Well, I finally made it! Of course I can't actually do anything with it because there are no apps (they get added in blfs). But it boots, I can log in as root and I know the network is up because I can ping Google.

    I've checked all the logs and they look sane. I feel very pleased with myself.
    "I'm just a little old lady; don't try to dazzle me with jargon!"

  2. #2
    Linux User glennzo's Avatar
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    I once built LFS too. When the system actually booted and I was able to log in I too was thrilled. It was a lot of work to install that Linux system. Took a lot of time and a lot of reading (repeatedly reading the same docs) but in the end it was a fun project.
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  3. #3
    Penguin of trust elija's Avatar
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    For some reason I am seeing a dark and stormy night, a castle and then a lab. I am hearing "It's ALIIIIVE!"

    Speaking as someone who accepts that he'll probably never have the patience to have a serious go at LFS, may I say well done. Are you going to go BLFS?
    What do we want?
    Time machines!

    When do we want 'em?
    Doesn't really matter does it!?


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  4. #4
    Linux Guru Jonathan183's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hazel View Post
    Well, I finally made it! Of course I can't actually do anything with it because there are no apps (they get added in blfs). But it boots, I can log in as root and I know the network is up because I can ping Google.

    I've checked all the logs and they look sane. I feel very pleased with myself.
    good stuff ... got to a similar point myself about a year ago and decided I'd need a package manager. I still have the basic install and started working my way through blfs ... but stalled at the package manager decision point. I decided guix was probably the way for me to go but put things to one side - late in 2012.

  5. #5
    Linux Engineer hazel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by elija View Post
    Speaking as someone who accepts that he'll probably never have the patience to have a serious go at LFS, may I say well done. Are you going to go BLFS?
    Of course! LFS is no bloody use by itself. But I haven't quite got to the end of the book. Aparently there's still a bit of tidying up to do.
    "I'm just a little old lady; don't try to dazzle me with jargon!"

  6. #6
    Penguin of trust elija's Avatar
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    I've often wondered, is it actually a good learning experience or do you just end up blindly following instructions?
    What do we want?
    Time machines!

    When do we want 'em?
    Doesn't really matter does it!?


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  7. #7
    Linux Engineer hazel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by elija View Post
    I've often wondered, is it actually a good learning experience or do you just end up blindly following instructions?
    Well, you can just follow the instructions, but I didn't. Much of the material, especially the configuration options used for the builds, is well explained. For commands (and there were a lot of sed edits) I used the man pages to see exactly what the edit did. Often I had the relevant file listing on another terminal both before and after the edit. So yes, I think I did learn quite a bit.

    I cheated occasionally. I had to put an "illegal" symbolic link into one of my library directories to get gcc to build correctly the first time. There is a correspondence going on about that currently in the mailing list so I hope I can learn what actually went wrong. And I didn't install GRUB because I don't like it and anyway I don't need it. I have two copies of lilo on this machine (one in Debian for regular use and one in Crux for emergencies), so all I had to do to make lfs bootable was to add a stanza to both lilo.conf files and then run one of them.

    I think it's been good fun. In fact it was quite addictive while it was going on.
    "I'm just a little old lady; don't try to dazzle me with jargon!"

  8. #8
    Penguin of trust elija's Avatar
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    So like everything else, you get out what you put in. I really wish I had the patience to have a go at it but I know I would go mad waiting for the compiles to complete. That's what happened when I tried Crux and building FreeBSD!
    What do we want?
    Time machines!

    When do we want 'em?
    Doesn't really matter does it!?


    Conkybots: Interactive plugins for your Conkys!

  9. #9
    Linux Engineer MASONTX's Avatar
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    Hey Elija, just noticed your new avatar. Good one.
    Registered Linux user #526930

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