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So have you come to your car, truck, or van and found that every valuable in it has been stolen?? You may be yet another victim of criminals using the ...
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  1. #1
    Linux Enthusiast cousinlucky's Avatar
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    Mystery Gadgets Being Used


    So have you come to your car, truck, or van and found that every valuable in it has been stolen?? You may be yet another victim of criminals using the mystery device!!
    A Mystery Device To Steal Your Car ? LewRockwell.com
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  2. #2
    Linux Engineer hazel's Avatar
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    How do these electronic keys actually work? Do they send a passcode or just a beep on a particular frequency? I find it hard to believe the latter; it would be too easy to duplicate that. But if there is a code of some kind that has to be sent, how do the thieves discover it?

    I recently read a book (unfortunately I can't remember what it was called) in which someone explodes a nuclear bomb high up in the atmosphere that creates an electromagnetic pulse which puts the whole of America out of action. Permanently. One of the things that leads to disaster is that all cars and other means of transport now run "by wire", so they are all permanently fried. Only a few classic cars from the 50s and 60s can still run after the disaster.
    "I'm just a little old lady; don't try to dazzle me with jargon!"

  3. #3
    Linux Newbie slw210's Avatar
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    Sounds like Urban Legend to me. Similar rumor as the one about going around opening garage doors. Might have been possible many years ago, but not these days.

    This article would indicate it is nearly impossible HowStuffWorks "Can other people unlock my car door with their remote?"

    Before this rolling code system was developed, thieves were able to use electronic devices called "code grabbers" to lock onto your keyfob's unique signal. With rolling codes, the signal is unique every time, rendering a code grabber device useless
    And Snopes snopes.com: Code Grabbers and Remote Keyless Entry

    That form of more robust code system became the industry standard for remote keyless entry systems in the mid-1990s, so automobiles newer than that are not vulnerable to being quickly and easily opened by criminals armed with the first generation of code grabbers.
    So far we haven't encountered any documented cases of items being stolen from locked cars via entry gained through the use of code grabbers, much less evidence that it's a widespread form of theft. There have been a few reported incidents of thieves' managing to gain entry to locked vehicles through the apparent use of some form of electronic device, but the specific nature of those devices has yet to be determined. In some similar cases it has been speculated that thieves who have been stealing purses and other valuables from parked vehicles have been using a device that blocks remote keyless signals and thus prevents car doors from locking (rather than using a device that emulates remote keyless signals to open locked doors).
    As a side note, I manually lock my doors when getting out and always have.

  4. #4
    Linux Guru rokytnji's Avatar
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    No toolbar in Chromium so "How do these electronic keys actually work? "

    Maybe this will explain it Hazel.

    Can Thieves Steal Your Keyless-Entry Codes? - Feature - Car Reviews - Car and Driver

    What Is a Rolling Code?

    So back before rolling code. It was possible to intercept your wireless transmit and use it to unlock the car.

    I tried at Snopes to see if this report is a urban legend but I got no hits on search at snopes.
    What is missing from the Rockwell report is the date of the cars being broke into.
    Older vehicles don't have the rolling code while newer ones do.
    FUD usually operates this way which chaps my hide. I hate lazy reporting.

    "And this could only just be the beginning of a major high tech crime wave."

    Could, maybe, almost, kinda sorta. Sheesh. KMA> ROK

    I don't know for sure yet but I am taking Cuz's link with a grain of salt for now.
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  5. #5
    Super Moderator Roxoff's Avatar
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    More from LewRockwell.com? May I refer you to the answer I made before..

    Mystery gadgets? What utter nonsense. If there is a device that can intercept or simulate RF signals used by cars, and it can crack or force the code... that's straightforward enough, but it'll be a brute force attack. It's pretty easy to defeat brute force attacks on those signals, as we all know - just use asymmetric public keys and longer hashes.

    I had to laugh at this:
    Nobody, not even the car manufacturers, knows how it works.
    Nobody? Really? Not even the person that built the device? Well it must be magic then. Perhaps there's a little pixie in it, and when you press the button, it jumps onto the car, climbs inside, and unlocks the doors, then jumps back into the little box...

    Or, maybe, it generates an RF signal and it just tries known unlock codes, hashing and brute forcing for a few seconds until it gets a result. Oh no, hang on, I can't possibly know this because:

    Nobody, not even the car manufacturers, knows how it works.
    It's an easy thing to fix, if you're a car manufacturer. This is a non-story for three reasons:

    1. If cars could be opened in this way, there'd be a huge recall and a software update to strengthen the locks. That might even be coming. It might even be fooled by using the cars deadlocks.
    2. If you leave valuables on view in the car, then people can just smash a window to get in and walk off with them, they don't need some fancy spy device. If you leave your iPad on the passenger seat while parked in the city, then don't expect it there when you get back.
    3. Nobody is stealing cars here - it's only simulating enough RF signal to fool the locks of the car, not accessing the ignition system. It grants no more access than anyone who can smash a windows could get - it just does it more quietly.
    Last edited by Roxoff; 01-03-2014 at 10:45 PM.
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  6. #6
    Linux Engineer MASONTX's Avatar
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    Hey, maybe they have a rasberry pi in the box running linux and a script to hack the signal?
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  7. #7
    Linux Enthusiast cousinlucky's Avatar
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    The old saying of " Where there is a will; there is a way! " comes to my mind. In today's world it seems that nothing is going to remain secure for very long!!
    PCLinuxOS Gnome and PCLinuxOS Mate
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    You Should Not Give In To Evils, But Proceed Ever More Boldly Against Them!! -from book six of Virgil's Aeneid
    Everything Within The Universe Is Related; We Are All Cousins!!

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