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Hey guys, I'm starting this thread to see how popular SteamOS is currently, and then I'll start another some time after release. So the questions are: 1) Given its current ...
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  1. #1
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    SteamOS: Aye/Nay?


    Hey guys,

    I'm starting this thread to see how popular SteamOS is currently, and then I'll start another some time after release.

    So the questions are:

    1) Given its current hardware requirements, would you get it?
    --If you do have it, what is your experience?
    2) Do you plan on getting it on release?
    3) Would this be considered another Distro?

    I appreciate any time and thought given here!

  2. #2
    Trusted Penguin Irithori's Avatar
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    1) yes
    2) will install the beta and also the final release
    3) I would say so

    To expand a bit on the topics:
    1) The minimum requirements state (in a nutshell):
    - dedicated harddisc
    - uefi
    - nvidia graphic card

    SteamOS needs a dedicated harddisc because the installer will wipe the disc.
    There are ways around that and I would probably be able to do that, but as SteamOS is meant as a "toy with one purpose", I dont want to customize it.
    It boots via uefi. There are ways to boot it on non-uefi motherboards, but again: I dont want to customize it
    Afaik, only nvidia graphiccards are a viable option for demanding games.
    AMD and Intel will and want to follow, but their drivers are just not on the same level.
    The hardware specs of all three companies are not fully open (yes, even and especially the intel ones), so the open source drivers are also not viable for serious gaming.

    2) For the lack of suitable hardware, I only played with SteamOS in a VM

    3) SteamOS is essentially debian wheezy + a custom kernel + some patched libraries/apps + proprietary modules (nvidia drivers etc) + the Steam App.
    But as valve created a name of their distribution as well as providing a repository for it, SteamOS is a distribution imho.


    Personal thoughts:
    The introduction of the app store in windows 8 quite clearly shows where microsoft is heading:
    They want a closed platform, similar to what google has with the android store or apple with theirs.
    ie: One company fully controls what software is available on their platform or not.
    Yes, I am aware of rooting devices. But this will only be done by a fraction of the user base and has consequences.
    It is also questionable if ms is successfull in that project, as the PC is traditionally an open platform and people will need reasons to update to a closed one.
    On the other hand, you can see All-in-One PCs and mobiles (tablets, convertible ultrabooks) on the rise, which are not expandable or repairable. You turn them on and they "just work", like a iPhone or android device.

    The point is: If that closed platform would succeed, then this would be the death of steam.
    Why would a user need the steam client and the *especially* the steam store, if there is a windows store?
    Also the game developers will want to talk to ms directly instead of valve.

    So valve had to act and create their own platform.
    The specs for the steam machines are open.
    They have chosen linux, put a fair amount of effort in it and are willing to support it.
    Valve also has enough weight in the industry to motivate nvidia, amd and intel to enhance ther drivers and support (about f.. time)
    Also game developers now have to reevaluate their linux support, valve themselve and crytek and several indy developers being commited already.


    Can SteamOS fail?
    Yep.
    Imho there needs to be a critical mass of AAA titles.
    If the best (or even only best looking) games stay windows only, then the gamers will not change their platform. (source: I am a gamer)

    But I hope for the best and took the SteamOS as a reason to replace my three year old gaming PC with something modern.
    The parts are ordered and my new gaming machine will have two SSDs: One 1Tbyte for w81, one 256GByte for SteamOS.
    Last edited by Irithori; 01-07-2014 at 06:41 PM.
    You must always face the curtain with a bow.

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    Cool Oh Yes SteamOS is awesome!

    Quote Originally Posted by Wolfen124 View Post
    Hey guys,

    I'm starting this thread to see how popular SteamOS is currently, and then I'll start another some time after release.

    So the questions are:

    1) Given its current hardware requirements, would you get it?
    --If you do have it, what is your experience?
    2) Do you plan on getting it on release?
    3) Would this be considered another Distro?

    I appreciate any time and thought given here!
    1: Own it
    2: Love it
    3. NO!


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  5. #4
    Penguin of trust elija's Avatar
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    I'm a definite "nay" but then I am so far from their target audience that if I was interested Valve would have been going very, very wrong
    "I used to be with it, then they changed what it was.
    Now what was it isn't it, and what is it is weird and scary to me.
    It'll happen to you too."

    Grandpa Simpson



    The Fifth Continent

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    No on all counts. I don't understand the buzz about steamos/box in the same way that I didn't understand the buzz about android and other "linux based" crap. All of the gushing about how great it will be and how it will "bring games to Linux" is hot air at this stage. Valve are a proprietary software company, and like many derived products, this will be yet another proprietary product - complete with blobs and Valve's DRM spyware. There was a time when GNU/Linux users recognised the true threat - proprietary software and mega corps like Apple, google, MS. Nowadays all that's forgotten and everyone is eager to jump into bed with these companies.

    What many of the exuberant proponents of this fail to realise is that 99% of progress will be in blob drivers and thus upstream will not really gain much from this (end users may get better blob drivers, but that's about it). In years to come the end result will be an OS which is useless to many without proprietary packages - may as well just run windows...

    Valve have done nothing for GNU/Linux from day one, never ported any of their games and never released source code - even for the original Half-Life which was based on Quake, despite ID releasing the source code for Quake, Quake II and Quake III.

    They are now jumping onboard, simply because they want to get into the console market and compete with MS and Sony. Nvidia are also getting involved for the same reasons.

  7. #6
    Linux Newbie mactruck's Avatar
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    I love Steam but I hate Windows. One of my friends was showing me something that Steam offers. It's the In Home Streaming. I have two computers in my network. I have my gaming pc and then I have my media server. My media server is linux and my video card is AMD. This has caused me lots of issues when I have tried to play games on my linux box. I would rather play on my media server because it is connected to my tv and my windows computer is in the other room. With In Home Streaming I can have my windows pc run the game and have it stream to my linux box. I can use the keyboard/mouse/monitor on my linux box and my windows pc does all the hardware processing. I can play any of my "Windows only" games on my linux box with no issues. Well I should say little issue. One thing I have noticed is the audio can get choppy.

  8. #7
    Linux Newbie SL6-A1000's Avatar
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    No, i don't see much point at the moment. There is just no incentive for me at least. I am more likely to use another Linux for Home Entertainment that suites my needs (no offense to Steam). Which only leaves the games and none of the current games in steams Linux library are worthwhile and worth paying for just to try SteamOS. Combine this with the fact that a lot of the non-steam Linux games are rated well, fun, challenging and entertaining.
    If they manage to add some of the more well known titles like Civilization, Worms, Need for Speed, Age of Empires etc... i would be more likely to give it a whirl.

    Please note that while i sound not interested, i am not anti the idea but as mentioned above nothing has my current interest to use Steam OS.

    Quote Originally Posted by flunwyc View Post
    No on all counts. I don't understand the buzz about steamos/box in the same way that I didn't understand the buzz about android and other "linux based" crap. All of the gushing about how great it will be and how it will "bring games to Linux" is hot air at this stage. Valve are a proprietary software company, and like many derived products, this will be yet another proprietary product - complete with blobs and Valve's DRM spyware. There was a time when GNU/Linux users recognised the true threat - proprietary software and mega corps like Apple, google, MS. Nowadays all that's forgotten and everyone is eager to jump into bed with these companies.

    What many of the exuberant proponents of this fail to realise is that 99% of progress will be in blob drivers and thus upstream will not really gain much from this (end users may get better blob drivers, but that's about it). In years to come the end result will be an OS which is useless to many without proprietary packages - may as well just run windows...

    Valve have done nothing for GNU/Linux from day one, never ported any of their games and never released source code - even for the original Half-Life which was based on Quake, despite ID releasing the source code for Quake, Quake II and Quake III.

    They are now jumping onboard, simply because they want to get into the console market and compete with MS and Sony. Nvidia are also getting involved for the same reasons.
    While i agree with you whole-heartily, there is only so much you can do if a company decides to incorporate something open-source into a product they want to offer. While it is probably true they are only doing it to get console market share, you have to hope they have enough respect for open-source that they will actually provide more than just proprietary blobs and drivers back to the community. Also Linux is currently the top and the most open-source community, if you look at some of the others like Plan 9, BSD, Solaris, etc especially BSD, they get used by corporations all the time and 99% of the stuff developed on top of there Kernel/OS isn't contributed back to the community. So Linux is doing very well when you consider it could be far worse.
    Last edited by SL6-A1000; 02-18-2014 at 03:16 AM.

  9. #8
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    As nice as it would be to see a successful linux gaming distro, it's a little bit backwards in my opinion. Computer games became popular because people already had computers for work or other office type tasks. Games were added to those machines to extend their functionality. In order for gaming on Linux to be successful, the Linux desktop has to be adopted by the business community.

    If anything is going to bring games ported to Linux, it's going to be AMD's new API. AMD put their chips in both the PS4 and the XB1. As far as I can tell, if the developers are using AMD's native API, the titles should be easily portable across all systems, Linux included, if you have an AMD card. Time will tell if the developers actually port the games though.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wolfen124 View Post
    Hey guys,

    I'm starting this thread to see how popular SteamOS is currently, and then I'll start another some time after release.

    So the questions are:

    1) Given its current hardware requirements, would you get it?
    --If you do have it, what is your experience?
    2) Do you plan on getting it on release?
    3) Would this be considered another Distro?

    I appreciate any time and thought given here!

    1. No.
    2. No...probably not.
    3. Incredibly happy with my Arch install. Any other distro I try will land in Virtualbox.

  11. #10
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    I am voting yes on all accounts as overall I like Steam and Valve, sure they have DRM but their approach to DRM is actually rather fair compared to how utterrly crap DRM is on other systems.
    I am also a fan of Gabe Newell and feel he is sincere in his intent.
    I know a lot of FSF nuts are against it but I dont play on the FSF side and remain in the middle ground.

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