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  1. #1
    Just Joined! sidzen's Avatar
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    Favorite varietal coffee roast?


    Those from the Pacific Northwest, where coffee in an office waiting room is almost a given, tend to be discriminating when the mundane topic coffee comes up for conversation. As such, I am not addressing the Folgers drinkers out there if it is a personal preference, but those who savor the flavor, so to speak.

    Right now, I am enjoying a mug of costco's Costa Rican. (Of course, I grind the beans to suit, as well). Central American varietals like the Costa Rican roast just mentioned or a Guatemalan tend to be what I favor. But not always: Peruvian and Tanzanian or Rwandan are good for a change of pace, I find.

    I would like to know your favorite varietal and the roaster, too, if you so choose to divulge!
    Last edited by sidzen; 07-26-2014 at 02:47 PM. Reason: grammar

  2. #2
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Ah, coffee! When I can get it, my favorite is Coatepec coffee from Veracruz Mexico. It is grown on the slopes of Mt. Orizaba (the 2nd highest peak in North America) in the "cloud zone". It is considered by many to be the best coffee in the world - certainly on par with Hawaiian Kona coffee. My sister who lives in Xalapa Veracruz, at about 4000 feet altitude with a nice patio view of Orizaba, sends me a couple of kilos with friends when they come up here to the states. My local coffee shop grinds the beans to my specifications, and then we share a nice cappuccino together!

    FWIW, attached is the photo used by my wallpaper of Orizaba, taken from a friend's house in Xalapa. You can see the "cloud zone" in the photo. There are some great areas there for hiking and camping, and coffee beans growing naturally along the paths...

    Orizaba.jpg
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  3. #3
    The cubita coffee was good like their cigars, although I usually take cream I enjoyed it black. I used a french press and water less than the boiling point.

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  5. #4
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ohmy View Post
    The cubita coffee was good like their cigars, although I usually take cream I enjoyed it black. I used a french press and water less than the boiling point.
    Yes. You definitely don't want to use a french press with water at the boiling point. Let it cool for 1 minute, and then pour into the press. After 2 minutes, pour in a little bit of cold water, which will cause the grounds to precipitate to the bottom, and then push the plunger/filter down.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  6. #5
    Linux Enthusiast Steven_G's Avatar
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    Well this one is over my head and out of my league. I drink mud.

    But my senior was very particular about his coffee and his setup. If you wanted to sweat your brains out watching the vault for a shift or three just go within two feet of his coffee maker; which was not your normal setup. I don't even know what it was. It had lots of levers and knobs on it. He was always going on about new varieties he was trying.

    Well he got one that was from Jamaica and I had done a bang up job that same day on my flight level re-cert and he wanted to go over my scores with me and called me in his office. It was the one and only time he ever offered me a cup of coffee.

    I have to tell you I've never had a cup of coffe like that in my life. I had no idea coffee could be that good.

    But, at $50 (US) a pound I'll have to stick to mud!

  7. #6
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steven_G View Post
    Well this one is over my head and out of my league. I drink mud.

    But my senior was very particular about his coffee and his setup. If you wanted to sweat your brains out watching the vault for a shift or three just go within two feet of his coffee maker; which was not your normal setup. I don't even know what it was. It had lots of levers and knobs on it. He was always going on about new varieties he was trying.

    Well he got one that was from Jamaica and I had done a bang up job that same day on my flight level re-cert and he wanted to go over my scores with me and called me in his office. It was the one and only time he ever offered me a cup of coffee.

    I have to tell you I've never had a cup of coffe like that in my life. I had no idea coffee could be that good.

    But, at $50 (US) a pound I'll have to stick to mud!
    Myself, I don't like to spend more than $12 per pound. Sounds like your senior was a real coffee snob, even if he does know his beans!

    And BTW, mud when brewed properly, can be pretty decent...
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  8. #7
    Linux Engineer TNFrank's Avatar
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    We've been using the Folgers Black Silk and making it Cold Brew style in some 2 qt. Ball/Mason jars. I normally let it sit for 2 days before I filter it through a coffee filter then put it back into the washed out jar and store it in the refrigerator. When I want some coffee I just pour it into my cup and pop it into the micro-wave for a couple minutes and Bob's your Uncle, hot coffee that's as smooth as can be.
    Check out the YouTube vid on the DIY Trying site on Cold Brew coffee. It's uber good stuff.
    No matter where ya' go, there ya' are.

  9. #8
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    @TNFrank
    There are lots of really great coffee brewing techniques that let one take non-premium coffee and end up with some really drinkable caffeinated brew. It seems you found one that works well for you. I have not tried the cold brewing technique you mention, but I will investigate! I do know that microwave reheated french press coffee is quite drinkable.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  10. #9
    The drip machines are popular as they require little time in our busy lives. I find that refrigerating the coffee and turning off the dripper when the brew is finished and drinking then gets the best result. even folgers taste better although personally I find maxwell house and nabob taste like it was ground with the heel of a workboot and scraped off the floor with a asphalt shovel and brewed with tepid toilet water, some effort in storage and brewing does help.

    At one time I lived near a roaster and had fresh roasted beans to grind, these days I usually end up with the market variety. I guess brewers and brewing is another conversation but coffee storage should be close to topic. where do you keep your beans and ground. I use to like grinding a pot of several varieties and storing it in labeled containers on the fridge door and selecting from their with the remaining beans in the pantry but not an excess amount.

  11. #10
    Linux Engineer TNFrank's Avatar
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    My wife had to give up drinking coffee in the morning before she went to work because it would upset her stomach but with the cold brewing technique she can drink coffee again because the cold water doesn't bring the acids out of the coffee like hot brewing did.
    Many times it's not what the coffee is as much as how it's made that makes it drinkable or not.
    No matter where ya' go, there ya' are.

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