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Bear in mind that Linux has an entirely undeserved reputation of being hard to use. Let's not forget the whole third party software thing that keeps biting people in the ...
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  1. #11
    Just Joined! rm-rf's Avatar
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    Bear in mind that Linux has an entirely undeserved reputation of being hard to use. Let's not forget the whole third party software thing that keeps biting people in the rear. Also imagine if someone offered to sell you a flying car. It doesn't matter if you tell them how much easier it is to drive than a regular car; the fact that you feel so inexperienced with it is enough to make some people back out.

  2. #12
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    My wife's computer is running MX-14 and it's working out OK. However, one of her comments always reminds me that Linux is fundamentally different from Windows. She clicked on something and the password window popped up. She called me and asked what was happening and I told her parts of the system require different access. Her comment was: "It's my damn computer, why do I need permission to use it".

    Regardless of how much a Linux desktop looks like a Windows desktop, running a computer on Linux is a lot different than running a computer on Windows. While I'm reasonably comfortable now in Linux, it took a bit of time to acclimate. Since I always dual boot I could run Windows until (and if) I figured out how to accomplish a task in Linux. Were I somebody with zero Linux experience I would not have bought the Linux only computer either...
    Last edited by NGIB; 07-31-2014 at 11:06 AM.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by NGIB View Post
    My wife's computer is running MX-14 and it's working out OK. However, one of her comments always reminds me that Linux is fundamentally different from Windows. She clicked on something and the password window popped up. She called me and asked what was happening and I told her parts of the system require different access. Her comment was: "It's my damn computer, why do I need permission to use it".
    Actually, if you set doze up right that happens all the time too and I have to explain it to people all day long:

    Because the computer is not as smart as you are. It will do whatever you tell it to do. Including infect itself with coodies. This is a process that could be used for good or bad things. So the humans who designed put a check in there to make sure you really want to do this. Otherwise the bad guys could do it all day long and you'd never know that anything bad was happening in the background.
    TNFrank likes this.

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  5. #14
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    That was just an example of how things are different. My worst day with Linux was trying to use Mint 17 to setup my son's new Ipod Classic. While I hate Apple stuff, it was a gift from his wife so it was "great". After 5 solid hours of trying everything I could find Googling, loading at least a dozen different programs, and fiddling with multiple config files - I gave up a beaten man. We loaded Win 7 and Itunes on his computer and had the Ipod loaded and running in minutes. Is this the fault of Mint or Linux in general, no, it's Apple blocking access to anything besides Windows or Mac on their hardware. That doesn't change the fact that Linux could not do the task I needed done and I tried everything in my power to make it work. Such is life with Linux, while it can do 90% of the things you use your computer for - that remaining 10% can be a stopper...

  6. #15
    Linux User Steven_G's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NGIB View Post
    That was just an example of how things are different. My worst day with Linux was trying to use Mint 17 to setup my son's new Ipod Classic. While I hate Apple stuff, it was a gift from his wife so it was "great". After 5 solid hours of trying everything I could find Googling, loading at least a dozen different programs, and fiddling with multiple config files - I gave up a beaten man. We loaded Win 7 and Itunes on his computer and had the Ipod loaded and running in minutes. Is this the fault of Mint or Linux in general, no, it's Apple blocking access to anything besides Windows or Mac on their hardware. That doesn't change the fact that Linux could not do the task I needed done and I tried everything in my power to make it work. Such is life with Linux, while it can do 90% of the things you use your computer for - that remaining 10% can be a stopper...

    Trust me. I totally feel your pain on stuff like that. I support doze at work. So I get to see the ugly under belly of it all the time. And I support 150K users. So I get to see what users are really like all day long.

    As much as doze drives me up the wall it puts food on the table. And I still have to run it in a virtual machine to get some of my stuff to work too.

    Speaking of which: Have you played with VMs yet? Virtual Box is very easy to use in *nix and a doze VM will do *all* your doze stuff except play games. You need OK hardware to run it though. My wife's laptop has an i3 with 4GB RAM and she's able to run a doze VM on hers. But on a system like that you have to turn off all the eye candy and run it in "classic" theme; which I prefer any way.

    Dual booting is always an option. And I do it to play games; even though I know better because it's not ideal. Having doze directly on the hardware makes you a lot more vulnerable to crap that can fry the master boot record; which can blow your whole system out of the water, *nix and all. If you're not playing games, need doze and don't want to mess with config files (think Wine) then a VM is a really good way to go. It's a lot more secure and safer to run doze w/o giving it access to the hardware. Running it in a VM uses a lot less disk space too. And you can make a back up copy of the VM and if it crashes or gets infected all you have to do is delete it, copy the BU back to your HD, run the updates and you're totally fixed.

    If you don't want to get in to that though then I highly recommend, at a minimum, that you get good with clonezilla or one of the other open source back programs that do sector by sector back ups of the entire disk; including the MBR. Programs like that can handle putting back both doze and *nix and restoring the *whole* disk at once. It's a lot less trouble than having to do a full rebuild or a multi-step restore where you have to do the MBR manually and then put doze and *nix back separately.

  7. #16
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    I've toyed with Virtualbox a very little bit but I'm not convinced that's the way forward for me. I own 4 laptops with good hardware and each has a licensed copy of Windows. I did a test using VMware to do a conversion on my I-7 and I actually got it running in VB but USB did not work and I could not get full 1920x1080 resolution. I didn't spend a lot of time tinkering with it as it's just easier to dual boot.

    I read about Robolinux and how it's supposed to do this magically...

  8. #17
    Linux User Steven_G's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NGIB View Post
    I've toyed with Virtualbox a very little bit but I'm not convinced that's the way forward for me. I own 4 laptops with good hardware and each has a licensed copy of Windows. I did a test using VMware to do a conversion on my I-7 and I actually got it running in VB but USB did not work and I could not get full 1920x1080 resolution. I didn't spend a lot of time tinkering with it as it's just easier to dual boot.

    I read about Robolinux and how it's supposed to do this magically...
    I've read about Robo too. I haven't played with it yet though, I'm still not convinced. But if you ever want help with virtual box then open a thread or send me a PM. I've got that puppy pretty well nailed down. And if you want to get really spiffy VMware has a tool that you can install to your current doze on hardware install that you can then use to export that complete hardware install to a VM which you can then run on VB. Now that one does get a little hackalicious. But, once it's up and running it's as smooth as butter.


    ------------

    EDIT:

    BTW, just FYI, VMware is really twitchy and I recommend staying away from it except for their export tool. Virtual Box is a lot more stable and a lot easier to use.

  9. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steven_G View Post
    I've read about Robo too. I haven't played with it yet though, I'm still not convinced. But if you ever want help with virtual box then open a thread or send me a PM. I've got that puppy pretty well nailed down. And if you want to get really spiffy VMware has a tool that you can install to your current doze on hardware install that you can then use to export that complete hardware install to a VM which you can then run on VB. Now that one does get a little hackalicious. But, once it's up and running it's as smooth as butter.


    ------------

    EDIT:

    BTW, just FYI, VMware is really twitchy and I recommend staying away from it except for their export tool. Virtual Box is a lot more stable and a lot easier to use.
    I did use the VMWare converter on my I-7 but as I said I got less than stellar results. I suspect Robolinux uses a converter very similar to VMWare and I'd be interested to hear unbiased comments on how well it works...

  10. #19
    Linux User Steven_G's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NGIB View Post
    I did use the VMWare converter on my I-7 but as I said I got less than stellar results...
    There are some tricks and quirks to it, no doubt. It's not straight up plug and play at all. I had to bang my head against it for a while (good thing I have a hard head) and spend many a night with google to get it squared away.

    I've already had the labor pains. If you decide you want to give it another crack let me know and I can probably help you get it squared away fairly quickly since I've already gotten it to work.

  11. #20
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    On Apple hardware Linux can be hit and miss but it's not the fault of Linux, it's Apple and their proprietary crap that stops Linux from being able to play nice with the hardware. If Apple would release some of their code to Linux Devs they could put stuff into the kernel that would allow Linux to run great on Apple stuff. Remember, OS-X is based on FreeBSD so it's not so very different from Linux.
    My wife has run a few different Distros on her Netbook and other laptops we've had over the last year and a half and has been able to adapt to all of them. All she does is surf the web, check e-mail and Facebook and play Freecell so it doesn't matter what OS is on the system, as long as she can get to the Firefox button and the Freecell button she's fine.
    I just think the majority of users are too lazy to bother to try and learn a new way of doing things even if it is a better, safer way. They just sleepwalk through their day and reflexively do things without even thinking.
    One of the things I love about Linux is that you get to think when you use it. I never understood how Windows worked but I took to Linux when I moved from OS-X and felt right at home pretty much from day one.
    No matter where ya' go, there ya' are.

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