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It's possible to have hardware problems out of the box, or at any time after it comes out of the box. But I can't say for sure from long distance. ...
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  1. #11
    Linux Enthusiast sgosnell's Avatar
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    It's possible to have hardware problems out of the box, or at any time after it comes out of the box. But I can't say for sure from long distance. The USB port could be defective, or it could be something up the pipeline from there. Or it could be something else. But I've been pondering, and I don't know what the problem could be other than defective hardware somewhere. If it does turn out to be software, let us know, so we can all learn something.

  2. #12
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    I understand bro. I have been digging around the net myself basically searching for the meaning of

    "recovery_reason: 0x02 recovery button pressed "
    With the original hard drive inserted. The other beginning line with the Kingston was

    recovery_reason: 0x5a No bootable storage device in system


    So far I have dug up

    0x02-0x01
    Attempt boot counter, also known as the "remaining_attempts" flag. This takes precedence over bootable/tryboot. For more information, see the File System/Autoupdate document.
    from

    File System/Autoupdate Supplements - The Chromium Projects

    But it is late here and I am not sure I am chasing a red herring from the above site yet as my head and body are tired.
    Thanks for hanging with me. Every little thought helps my thinking process on this.
    Maybe I will find something out not posted about on the net yet. Then Hopefully the mods here can edit the title of my my thread from rant
    to exact error messages instead.

    I don't throw wrenches or get upset real easy but laziness can sometimes irk the crap out of me.
    Thanks again.

    Edit: Might be a red herring.

    Limiting the number of boot attempts
    An updated partition can attempt to boot only a limited number of times; if it doesn't boot successfully after a couple of attempts, then the system goes back to booting from the other partition. The number of attempts is limited as follows:

    When a partition has successfully been updated, it's assigned a remaining_attempts value, currently 6. This value will be stored in the partition table next to the bootable flag (there are unused bits in the GPT that the boot loader can use for its own purposes). The boot loader will examine all partitions in the system; if it finds any partition that has a remaining_attempts value > 0, it will decrement remaining_attempts and then attempt to boot from that partition. If the boot fails, then this process repeats.

    If no partitions have a remaining_attempts value > 0, the boot loader will boot from a partition marked bootable, as a traditional boot loader would.
    from

    http://www.chromium.org/chromium-os/...tem-autoupdate

    but I still am not sure because of the fog in my brain now.

    2nd edit: link for tomorrow for me to go over

    http://www.chromium.org/chromium-os/...t-and-recovery
    Last edited by rokytnji; 08-25-2014 at 05:11 AM.

  3. #13
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    Well, It is not a hardware issue. Just something I am ignorant about when it comes to making a drive recognizable to a Acer C710 so it will see a drive as a bootable device.
    In other words. DRM recognition.

    I closed with

    Closing this thread with the following because I am out of ideas.

    Tried the Kingston as a GPT formatted as ext4, then tried ext2 file systems. No joy.

    Pulled the Apple GPT 180 gig ssd drive I use in another laptop I have. No joy.

    Tried the 16 gig in my Samsung RV 510 laptop and booted gparted live iso and formatted as msdos partition and fat32. No joy in the Acer.

    All give 0x05a . Since I don't even know how to format the original drive (16gig SSD ) so it passes Acer drm muster.

    I am outa ideas. But. I gave it a good try I guess. I can use the 16 gig drive on other projects. I guess I'll have to spring for a used
    Acer C710 washed drive and go from there.

    Thanks for the ideas and support folks. I really appreciate it. It just was not meant to be I guess.
    Leaving with a link I started this idea/experiment off with.

    The part that snagged me.


    Kingston SSDNow V300 Series SV300S37A/120G 2.5" 120GB SATA III Internal Solid State Drive (SSD) 120G 7mm, sata 3 (6Gb/sec). This drive initially had issues, but writing the GPT seemed to correct the issue and install was successful.



    Happy Trails, Rok
    All connections were triple checked.
    If you wanna read the thread. https://groups.google.com/a/chromium...ss/Dyd4Dhwk61w

    All the drives are recognized by gparted in Linux. Mount just fine and I could install any linux to any of those drives. Only the Acer has hissy fits recognizing anything.

    This explains pretty good on why it is not a hardware issue.

    http://gaminglaptopspro.info/price-c...gray-16gb-ssd/
    Last edited by rokytnji; 08-26-2014 at 02:11 AM.

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  5. #14
    Linux Enthusiast sgosnell's Avatar
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    That has nothing to do with DRM. That's something else entirely. UEFI is not DRM. I'm still not certain that it's not hardware, but there is no way I can say anything for sure. The part about the recovery button being pressed makes me lean toward a hardware issue, but again I can't say for sure. In any case, you need to read up on UEFI. Like it or not, it's on all new hardware, and it's what we will have to deal with for at least the foreseeable future. Google has gone into secure booting with both feet, and ChromeOS is designed to insure that the OS has not been tampered with. You can bypass this by enabling developer mode, which will let you boot anything by either signing your own kernel, or by booting a legacy system by pressing Ctrl-L at boot time. But standard ChromeOS will not boot anything except a signed kernel. This has nothing to do with DRM (Digital Rights Management), but valid security concerns.
    rokytnji likes this.

  6. #15
    Linux User Steven_G's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sgosnell View Post
    That has nothing to do with DRM. That's something else entirely. UEFI is not DRM... This has nothing to do with DRM (Digital Rights Management), but valid security concerns.
    I guess that depends on your perspective. While it is not copywrite enforcement, a big part of it is all about trying to lock you in to their proprietary crap so that you can't do what you want to do with hardware that you own.

    And while yes there are security concerns with the old BIOS way of doing things I think that if they were all that friggin concerned about security they would not have hooked the pre-boot environment directly to the network stack and opened up another attack vector.
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  7. #16
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sgosnell View Post
    It's possible to have hardware problems out of the box, or at any time after it comes out of the box. But I can't say for sure from long distance. The USB port could be defective, or it could be something up the pipeline from there. Or it could be something else. But I've been pondering, and I don't know what the problem could be other than defective hardware somewhere. If it does turn out to be software, let us know, so we can all learn something.
    Systems tend to fail either early in their life, or they last a long time. I've had both. Knock on wood, my current laptop (Dell D630) is 8 years old and still going strong though I had to replace the disc once (under warranty). My workstation is 6 1/2 years old and still working (had to replace some drives - I have a bunch). I've had other gear that failed quickly (mostly disc drives) and were replaced under warranty. Also had some that failed out of warranty and had to buy new ones, usually at 1/2 the price of the old ones...
    Last edited by Rubberman; 08-27-2014 at 10:44 PM.
    rokytnji likes this.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  8. #17
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    Give me till next week. I'll figure the voodoo out on this thing yet. I was a helicopter mech. Industrial Electrician. Motorcycle rebuilder.
    Linux user. It is busting my huevos. But I'll figure out this can of worms yet. Next step is a tin foil jumper step.

  9. #18
    Linux Enthusiast sgosnell's Avatar
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    Steven_g, I think you're mistaken. Google does not lock you in to anything. All you have to do is enable developer mode, a very simple process, and you can boot anything you want. The boot security is enforced only in the default mode, which is easily bypassed, and Google provides the information for doing that. UEFI is not a Google invention, they just deal with it like the rest of the world.

  10. #19
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    All you have to do is enable developer mode, a very simple process, and you can boot anything you want.
    Till you get to a key combo like Cntl +D and no crosh screen shows up but recover media screen does.
    All while in developer mode because operating system verififcation is turned off.
    https://support.google.com/chromeboo...r/183101?hl=en

    Hence the tinfoil trick later when I have time next week.

    Studying up also on johnlewis.ie | Linux & custom Chromebook firmware

    I ended up with a lemon guys but I'll try and make lemonade out of mine.

    The canned answers of only certain hardware work on chromebooks and send it back to the manufacturer is a Windows mindset support structure.
    Which started this thread in the 1st place. Only Certain Hardware? Only certain hard drives? Give me a break.
    No explanation on why. Unless I find out for myself.

    What kind of support is that? Non-existant in my book. That is like me looking at a motorcycle and saying , "yeah, it's broke" and just leaving it at that.



    Sheesh. Wait till your chromebook does not boot with the idiot error "we have encountered a enexpected problem". Maybe then you will realize where I am coming from. Instead of a init 3 screen with text going by saying instead "waiting for udev" or "kernel panic" instead.
    Talk about locking a user out.

    It is not like I am not doing my research. Very Dissappointing though on how they set these things up.

    I guess nobody read my link

    Are clogged by default, only the startup with the operating systems in their default state approved Google. They are much more limited compared to traditional laptops Windows, Mac or Linux.

  11. #20
    Linux User Steven_G's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sgosnell View Post
    Steven_g, I think you're mistaken. Google does not lock you in to anything. All you have to do is enable developer mode, a very simple process, and you can boot anything you want. The boot security is enforced only in the default mode, which is easily bypassed, and Google provides the information for doing that. UEFI is not a Google invention, they just deal with it like the rest of the world.
    Yeah, but the whole UEFI things has a very big element of making it as big a PITA as possible and to make it as difficult as possible to take hardware you own and and modify the software on it. And IMHO, that was done on puporse. I mean yes, it does address some security concerns. But it do not do it well and it does it in such a way as to make it a headache for those of us who are tech geeks and total rocket science to the average user to move to an alternate OS.

    And I can't prove, but I truly believe that one of the points of the UEFI design was to make it as hard as possible for an average user to install an alternate OS. And from that perspective it is a type of DRM (sort of) designed to lock you in to their proprietary world and use what software they deem fit for you to use on *your* hardware.

    I mean just look at the threads that rayden had running for a while and all the hoops he had to jump through and all the help he needed to get *nix installed. And he was on the verge of giving up when we finally got him squared away. I applaud his tenacity. Most end users would have given up long before he did.

    And I know most of this crap is coming out of MS. And I believe that part of the motivation is to prevent market share losses to *nix b/c of everything going on in the MSverse; especially the death of XP, the dropping of main stream support for 7, the mess that was 8 and the total buiness model change which will be 9.

    And companies like google and apple are jumping on the band wagon; escpecially with "devices". The more they can do to lock you out of the hardware and force you to run their software the more they have you by the short hairs and can lock you in to payng for their apps and services and excluide other providers from even being able to serve content on their platform. It is the wave of the future and will only get worse. I mean look at what just happen with MS/google and MS's attempt at a native youtube app.

    Which is why I'll keep buying old BIOS junk and build what I want. If I have to I'll even go so far as to build a junk cluster to keep up with the jones in terms of "horse power" before I'll buy a locked piece of hardware.

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