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  1. #1
    Linux Engineer hazel's Avatar
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    Help! I'm bored!


    I can't believe it. This is probably the first time in ten years that I've been bored with my computer. I have no programs on the boil. I just upped sudoku_aid to version 1.0, having added a facility to highlight a duplicated value, but I can't think of anything else I need to program for. I have no translations or proofreading to do. I can't think of anything I want to study right now. I can't think of any more ramblings to write for my website.

    Can anybody think of something for me to do?
    "I'm just a little old lady; don't try to dazzle me with jargon!"
    www.hrussman.entadsl.com

  2. #2
    MX-15 is in beta test right now and another set of eyes would likely be welcome. I've been running it for a while and it's pretty good with some unique features. They ask for specific user help on their forum...

    MX & MEPIS Community Forum - Index page

  3. #3
    Linux Engineer hazel's Avatar
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    Hmm. I wouldn't normally recommend myself for testing out a distro as there is a huge swathe of Linux that I never use and know nothing about: all that multimedia stuff like music, video, streaming, etc. I don't even have sound on my desktop machine as I consider it a distraction.

    I suppose I could put MX on a stick (I do have unetbootin on Debian), run it live and then see if I can create a partition for it and install it using only the provided tools. There's plenty of room on the hard drive.

    Just out of interest, why yet another distro? What's its unique selling point? AntiX's usp is that it is designed to run on "antiques" that often won't run anything else. I seem to remember Mepis as a live distro based on Debian Sid at a time when live distros were rare. But these days most installation disks can run live demo systems as well. So why hybridise these two distros?
    "I'm just a little old lady; don't try to dazzle me with jargon!"
    www.hrussman.entadsl.com

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  5. #4
    I was merely pointing you to a place where they ask for help, I see proofreading and translation requests a lot.

    There are only 2 distros I recommend to noobs - MX (Debian) and Linux Lite (Buntu). Both are built for ease of use, good hardware support, are stable and well built, and have good support communities...

  6. #5
    Linux Enthusiast sgosnell's Avatar
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    I get bored with computer stuff now and then, and do something different. Learn to play a musical instrument. That's one of the things I enjoy most. I play several, and have been meaning to learn more. Violin and piano are on the list, but keep getting postponed. You can get a decent keyboard to learn on for not a lot of money, but cheap stringed instruments can be difficult to play even for experienced musicians, and should be avoided. Keyboards are closer to commodities, at least for playability.

  7. #6
    Linux Engineer hazel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sgosnell View Post
    I get bored with computer stuff now and then, and do something different. Learn to play a musical instrument. That's one of the things I enjoy most. I play several, and have been meaning to learn more. Violin and piano are on the list, but keep getting postponed. You can get a decent keyboard to learn on for not a lot of money, but cheap stringed instruments can be difficult to play even for experienced musicians, and should be avoided. Keyboards are closer to commodities, at least for playability.
    You're about 55 years too late! I've been an amateur cellist since my school days and I play regularly with a group at my church. It's really a gospel choir but we have quite a wide repertoire including Taize chants, modern charismatic stuff (which I don't have a very high opinion of), and also some of my own songs. We have also gradually acquired an instrumental section: piano, cello, guitar and violin.

    I have an excellent cello. It was a bit battered after many years of use so I recently had it refurbished; that cost me a few hundred pounds but they told me the instrument was worth about 2,000. Although I'm a skinflint where computers are concerned, I'm willing to spend money when I think it's appropriate. Believe it or not, I bought that cello for 50 back in the sixties.

    I'm not bored with life. I have plenty to do. It's just that I don't have much to do on the computer these days.
    "I'm just a little old lady; don't try to dazzle me with jargon!"
    www.hrussman.entadsl.com

  8. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by hazel View Post
    You're about 55 years too late! I've been an amateur cellist since my school days and I play regularly with a group at my church. It's really a gospel choir but we have quite a wide repertoire including Taize chants, modern charismatic stuff (which I don't have a very high opinion of), and also some of my own songs. We have also gradually acquired an instrumental section: piano, cello, guitar and violin.

    I have an excellent cello. It was a bit battered after many years of use so I recently had it refurbished; that cost me a few hundred pounds but they told me the instrument was worth about 2,000. Although I'm a skinflint where computers are concerned, I'm willing to spend money when I think it's appropriate. Believe it or not, I bought that cello for 50 back in the sixties.

    I'm not bored with life. I have plenty to do. It's just that I don't have much to do on the computer these days.
    Install pfsense in a VM and play with it...



    Sent from my Nexus 5 using Tapatalk

  9. #8
    Linux Enthusiast gruven's Avatar
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    Learn a new language. Install java or mono and learn to write a MVC from the ground up. Grab AngularJS and create a responsive website by accessing an outside api to do things for you. Learn how to write a REST controller on MVC. Serve your own website on the MVC you wrote. Learn Perl.

    There are lots of things to do.

    Code is Poetry

  10. #9
    Linux Engineer hazel's Avatar
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    Wow! I'm not a genius! Most of that stuff is wa-a-ay beyond me. Perl I've already burned my fingers with. I tried to learn it (more than once I think) and just couldn't get my head around it. Which is really strange because I usually learn languages quickly.

    I don't want to get involved with Java, which is a big unwieldy beast, but I suppose I might try C++ at a pinch. I already have a good grounding in C, which should help.

    But I think perhaps the best thing to do right now would be to learn a bit about virtual systems. I don't know the first thing about them and therefore I've always avoided having anything to do with them, but everyone else seems to be using them now; they're always popping up in posts about distros and one must move with the times. Perhaps I could learn how to install one and then install some distros into it. There's plenty of disk space.
    "I'm just a little old lady; don't try to dazzle me with jargon!"
    www.hrussman.entadsl.com

  11. #10
    Linux Enthusiast gruven's Avatar
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    -->
    Java and mono are easier to learn and use than C and C++ (IMO), and since you already have a basis in C, you would just need to learn about objects and how the languages handle them. C++ is a good way to do that. C++ offers quite a bit on C, and then there are objects.

    Java isn't a huge beast. The syntax is extremely C like, you just have to remember that it is object oriented. Objects make your life easier

    Essentially, as long as you understand the data structures and philosophies in C, you won't have a hard time learning other languages. It really is just syntax and capabilities.

    Code is Poetry

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