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Here's an interesting question. Although there are a lot of games for Linux, I don't think there are as many big name titles as there should be. Most games are ...
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  1. #1
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    Games


    Here's an interesting question. Although there are a lot of games for Linux, I don't think there are as many big name titles as there should be. Most games are written (either mostly or all) in C++, which, if you conform with the standard, is a platform independant language. OpenGL is also cross-platform and built into C++ with the GXBase. Is the propritetary DirectX the reason that more big name games don't have a Linux version?

    If so, don't you think that companies are limiting their game sales by using proprietary graphics libraries instead of open standards?

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    I hope I am getting this right, I have heard that when a big company comes out with a game- or a game plan- they take it to microsoft and tell them that they want their game to work on the Windows OS. Mircrosoft would reply something like "Okay, we will let your game run smoothly on Windows if you write it in a code that will not work on Linux- or would be hard to run on Linux". Of course the big game companies know that more people that play thier games will be on Windows not Linux they agree and those of us that are using Linux are left gameless. I am not sure if this is how it works, but it is to my understanding that it goes something like that.

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    I think, generally, that the companies that can afford ports won't see a substantial increase in sales; while the smaller companies that will see a big increase in sales can't afford the manpower for the port. If you'll notice, the big companies that do are generally the engine developers who are more interested in the technology behind the games, and even sometimes the freedom aspect (id, Epic, Croteam). Plus, even if few licensees will offer their own Mac or Linux ports, portability generally means cleaner code, so it helps sell licenses both in that the code is cleaner and that it leaves options open.

    Surely DirectX doesn't help, but even an engine written for OpenGL won't necessarily port easily. At this point I think it's still more of a market share thing, it just doesn't sell games. It gets you some good multiplayer servers and fan content yes, but not many sales.

    Slowly but surely, we're gaining ground. I don't expect anything to happen overnight, but I don't really care, I'm happy with games like NWN and Doom 3, and I'm very much looking forward to Dominions III, the Disciples 2 port, and more Planeshift content. I don't need all the latest games, but if I did there's always Cedega. I've actually been considering building it from CVS for the sake of Half Life 2.
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  5. #4
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    i do thnk that some big name games should go to linux, but being a gamer, i would support anything for linux gaming.
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    As an ex-Amiga user, I live in a real ...www.dungeony.cz/hoborg/amiga/pics/moonstone_001.png]gaming[/url] PARADISE!

    ...Seriously, speaking of modern games, GNU/Linux is on the way. I believe (and strongly hope) that GNU (Linux and the HURD), *BSD and the Unixes will be running the desktop place again at some point in the future.
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    Linux User GNU_man's Avatar
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    Also an ex-Amiga user After being forced to join the mainstream with IBM though, Linux gives us a chance to remain in the realm of computer "underground". Sometimes i wonder whether Linux destops going mainstream would really be good thing. I doubt it.
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    ^^ Exactly my opinion, the people using linux are real linux users ( i.enthey dont do it for the money) IF it went more mainstream then people would join for money.

    IMO anyway

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    well, hopefully the companies wouldn't be "in it for the money". the biggest worry is that linux could go the way of the internet. i remember when it was still small, bout 5 years ago, just before the dotcom boom. there were many quality sites, no ads, no popups and loads of free stuff. now it's all about the money. ads everywhere and many of the good sites have shut down because they simpy cannot afford to keep running. music companies and MS (among others) are trying to take it over and make everything subscription only. however, where linux differs is the community and the GPL. as long as th GPL exists i do feel that we have less to fear from companies trying to use it to get rich. maybe, just maybe, this sense of community (and free stuff) wil remain.
    Here's why Linux is easier than Windows:
    Package Managers! Apt-Get and Portage (among others) allow users to install programs MUCH easier than Windows can.
    Hardware Drivers. In SuSE, ALL the hardware is detected and installed automatically! How is this harder than Windows' constant disc changing and rebooting?

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    If really direct X is the worst factor, do anyone know of an open source directX compliant library for linux? If something like that existed, the game companies could a lot easier port their games... Unless microsoft starts putting roadblocks like they did/are doing with mono...

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    Linux User benjamin20's Avatar
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    they will, and that would be retarded because it retarded enough we already have two APIs. microsoft always has to make everything harder on the developers, and then try and offer them software to make it easier for them.
    nVidia G-Force 6600GT (bfg) pci-e: amd 64 2000+ (939): 1024 corsair ram: 2X 80gb seagate harddisk SATA: plextor cd/dvd-read/write cdrom SATA

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