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www.opensolaris.org Well, some time passed now since they announced it and released the CDDL. OpenSolaris popped in every now and then in the news. It may become a 'threat' to ...
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    tfk
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    OpenSolaris - Hot or not?


    www.opensolaris.org
    Well, some time passed now since they announced it and released the CDDL. OpenSolaris popped in every now and then in the news. It may become a 'threat' to GNU/Linux, but I think it will be more against the proprietary server Unices. It's not GPL'd, but the CDDL is OSI approved, so I'd love to have a look at it at least. So, what do you think of OpenSolaris - A great new OS in the Open-Source league? Or only a joke?

    IMO, the new Solaris has a very good chance on the server market, but it will have a very hard time on the desktop computers, until there's such a high number of software for OpenSolaris. Well, it's worth a try once it's released.

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    Solaris is an established operating system and an open source version of it is great news even
    just for the educational value.I'm no legal expert but I just read CDDL and it looks fine.
    Plus it's good for publicity reasons
    that a big company releases its operating system as open
    source.Sadly there are people who have the prejudice that
    the really good stuff only comes from big companies so it
    will be useful to convert them.

    As for the competition between Linux and Solaris I'm not
    that bothered.For me the important thing is that the idea
    that all software , not just operating systems , should be free and open source becomes established.
    Every open source major piece of software is a step in the right direction.

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    I'm interested in trying out Open Solaris when it's out. I never used Solaris before. Depending on what I see in it, it could find a home as a server, but nothing will replace Linux on my desktop, not for a long time at least.

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    may be a good OS to try...
    Linux is for those who want to know why their computer works.

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    Linux Guru Vergil83's Avatar
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    I have used solaris x86 and I couldn't really tell that much difference from linux.
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    Linux Guru techieMoe's Avatar
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    I am not a lawyer either, but the legal problems with the CDDL have been looked at on a few sites:

    http://www.groklaw.net/article.php?s...50202140308780
    http://techrepublic.com.com/5100-22-5476123.html
    http://www.eweek.com/article2/0,1759,1739000,00.asp

    I have read through the CDDL a few times top to bottom, and from a non-lawyer enduser perspective it is an OSS license. The problem I find with it is when you try to mix it with other licenses. Allow me to give a for instance:

    Sun makes a neat program for OpenSolaris and releases it under the CDDL.

    A Linux programmer likes it and wants to incorporate some of the code into a GPL project he's working on. BZZZZT. Can't do it. Why? Code released under the CDDL cannot be incorporated into GPL projects because the CDDL adds restrictions that are not GPL-compatible. End result? Code made for OpenSolaris stays for OpenSolaris and nothing else.

    I personally believe Sun did this on purpose, in an attempt to benefit (read: leech) from the OSS community and keep their stuff from being used on competitor (read: Linux) operating systems. This is not the OS you're looking for, move along.
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    Linux Engineer adrenaline's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by techieMoe
    I am not a lawyer either, but the legal problems with the CDDL have been looked at on a few sites:

    http://www.groklaw.net/article.php?s...50202140308780
    http://techrepublic.com.com/5100-22-5476123.html
    http://www.eweek.com/article2/0,1759,1739000,00.asp

    I have read through the CDDL a few times top to bottom, and from a non-lawyer enduser perspective it is an OSS license. The problem I find with it is when you try to mix it with other licenses. Allow me to give a for instance:

    Sun makes a neat program for OpenSolaris and releases it under the CDDL.

    A Linux programmer likes it and wants to incorporate some of the code into a GPL project he's working on. BZZZZT. Can't do it. Why? Code released under the CDDL cannot be incorporated into GPL projects because the CDDL adds restrictions that are not GPL-compatible. End result? Code made for OpenSolaris stays for OpenSolaris and nothing else.

    I personally believe Sun did this on purpose, in an attempt to benefit (read: leech) from the OSS community and keep their stuff from being used on competitor (read: Linux) operating systems. This is not the OS you're looking for, move along.
    Well written, thanks for the advice
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    The patent issues needs to be worked out. Other than that, I have no issues with their licensce. People have done just fine so far without putting Solaris code in their stuff, why should that change now?

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    Linux Guru techieMoe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by valan
    People have done just fine so far without putting Solaris code in their stuff, why should that change now?
    That's exactly my point. The license is self-serving. It doesn't help the OSS community at all; it's simply a call from Sun to use OSS developers to further their software.
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    But still it's a benefit to GPL programmers, because if they want to do something they can still see how it's done in a CDDL app as long as they then write it themselves. So even though it's not compatible, the code can still be referenced for knowledge and technique.
    Michael Salivar

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