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a butter knife is primarily used to butter bread, it can also be used as a murder weapon, it wasn't designed to hurt people, but should knife companies be sued ...
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  1. #11
    Linux User Krendoshazin's Avatar
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    a butter knife is primarily used to butter bread, it can also be used as a murder weapon, it wasn't designed to hurt people, but should knife companies be sued because that was the weapon of choice?
    it's the same with decss, where it's primary use is to allow people to watch the dvds that they bought on their linux machine, does this make decss responsible if it becomes the weapon of choice for the dvd pirates?
    i already knew how css worked and how to decode it even before i even took a look at the css source.

    css uses xor encryption to produce a series of keys, each encrypted by the other, the drive itself contains a legitimate code hardcoded onto a chip by the manufacturer, this code is then checked against a list of codes for legal drives and once confirmed, the drive and disk negotiate to produce a dvd key which can then be used to decrypt the title key, and then the title key used to decrypt the chapter key.

    why did i explain this? notice i said about a legal drive with a legitimate code, say someone purchased a legally purchased DVD and tried to play it on legally purchased hardware, what's the problem? css is the problem, you can't just stick a css protected disk into the drive and play it, decss addresses this problem.
    while the studios may have their best interests at heart, i fear this will only serve to shoot them in the foot, as people who legally purchase DVDs will suffer as a result of this.

    also on windows, software programs like powerdvd can be used to decrypt the dvd and then a ripper program used to rip the dvd once access has been gained, with powerdvd as the weapon of choice, should they be sued too? i didn't think so

  2. #12
    Linux Engineer adrenaline's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by retired1af
    Apparently the last suit was dropped.

    http://www.afterdawn.com/news/archive/4901.cfm

    However, if I recall, the DMCA effectively killed any chance of DeCSS being legal in the US.
    This isn't the same case that was origionally mentioned in the origional post.
    There were several law suits.
    Some people have told me they don't think a fat penguin really embodies the grace of Linux, which just tells me they have never seen a angry penguin charging at them in excess of 100mph. They'd be a lot more careful about what they say if they had.
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  3. #13
    Linux Engineer adrenaline's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Krendoshazin


    i fear this will only serve to shoot them in the foot, as people who legally purchase DVDs will suffer as a result of this.
    can you explain this further?
    Some people have told me they don't think a fat penguin really embodies the grace of Linux, which just tells me they have never seen a angry penguin charging at them in excess of 100mph. They'd be a lot more careful about what they say if they had.
    -- Linus Torvalds

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by adrenaline
    This isn't the same case that was origionally mentioned in the origional post. There were several law suits.
    Yeah... Not sure what the final outcome was. I do know an appeals court upheld it, but I do believe it was overturned later. That whole mess was pretty confusing to follow.
    Registered Linux user #384279
    Vector Linux SOHO 7

  5. #15
    Linux User Krendoshazin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by adrenaline
    can you explain this further?
    people like myself, i use my computer to play DVDs and will later set it up to send the data through the tv-out and be displayed on a tv. in the future i plan to use my computer for everything from complete home control, the central part of a security system and other things. i have no DVD player, just my DVD drive as i've never found the need for anything more, i'm sure i'm not alone in this situation.
    if i have no means to play them, then i will stop buying them, it's as simple as that

  6. #16
    Linux User Krendoshazin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Krendoshazin
    you can't just stick a css protected disk into the drive and play it, decss addresses this problem.
    i thought i should explain this further since it's open to misinterpretation, i was speaking of dvd drives, dvd players can play them no problem as the manufacturers pay the studios a certain fee to include a css decryption algorithm in their players, decss affects linux users and hence dvd drives, this is the point i was trying to make

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