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Imagine this scenario ---- The government, in its typical fashion, begins to use these computers. Businesses, who wish to obtain contracts to do business with the government, start using these ...
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  1. #11
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    Imagine this scenario ----

    The government, in its typical fashion, begins to use these computers.

    Businesses, who wish to obtain contracts to do business with the government, start using these computers.

    More businesses, finding they can't work or deal with businesses who use this chip, start using these computers.

    Get the picture? It's a slow, insidious process. And one that many won't realize what's happened until it's too late.
    Registered Linux user #384279
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  2. #12
    Linux User Krendoshazin's Avatar
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    to me it sounds like they're trying to fix a mole problem by sticking a nuke down a mole hill, linux has proved that the problem with virii, spamware and other things -can- be controlled even when giving the user -more- control over their system rather than restricting them.
    the whole thing feels like a quick and dirty fix to try and gain back the trust of the consumer, rather than addressing the actual problem at hand.

    people always give the argument that windows is more prone to virii and attacks because it's more popular, which is rubbish. if you look at apache, running over 80% of all web servers and also open source, suffers less successful attacks and exploits when compared to microsoft's IIS server, which is less popular and also closed source.
    if the hardware was the problem, then it would stand to reason that both apache and IIS would both be susceptible to an almost equal number of factors such as attacks, virii, worms and crackers, this however is not the case.

    A user who wanted to switch to a competing diary program might find it would be impossible for that new program to read the old diary, as the information would be "locked in" to the old program. It could also make it impossible for the user to read or modify his diary except as specifically permitted by the diary software. If he were using diary software with no edit or delete option then it could be impossible to change or delete previous entries.
    what about if you write a document at home, and then take it to school so you can work on it in class, you can forget about being able to access it, afterall that's the point of TC. maybe your printer ran out of ink and you need to have your friend print out a report for tommorow? forget it, sure you could unencrypt the document using owner override, but then you've put yourself in a position where a virus could infect the document and make the point of having TC in the first place obselete.

    i refuse to be labeled as a conspiracist, if you enjoy big brother controlling your every move then by all means go right ahead, i'm not afraid to speak out about what i believe is right

  3. #13
    Linux Guru lakerdonald's Avatar
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    i'd hope that somebody would come to their senses before anything like this is passed.

  4. #14
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    HAH! When was the last time our elected officials did anything that made sense?!
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  5. #15
    Linux Guru lakerdonald's Avatar
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    True. Lets hope that the whole Software Patents fiasco in Europe isn't a sign of things to come.

  6. #16
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    Considering that the majority of all elected officials (I'm talking world wide here) are probably totally and absolutely clueless when it comes to technological issues, I have no doubt that we'll see more and more asinine legislation.
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  7. #17
    Linux Guru lakerdonald's Avatar
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    I hate to sound pessimistic, but this could really be the beginning of the end.

  8. #18
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    Why can't anybody of you who really know what you're talking about tip the medias? The TV-channels, the newspapers, everybody! TIP 'EM!

    Nobody would resist it if they don't know what's going on...

  9. #19
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    And the media cares how?

    All the reporting in the world isn't going to cause anyone to sit up and take notice if they don't understand fully what's going on. And the only way to make them understand is to educate them on technology. My experience is you can't force that on anyone if they don't have the desire to learn.

    Add to that the fact that the main stream media lost its objectivity in reporting years ago and you have a recipe for disaster.
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  10. #20
    Linux Guru lakerdonald's Avatar
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    I've always been the last one to blame microsoft or knock the closed-source philosophy; MS is a valid company, just as closed-source is a valid method. But the TCPA is going too far. Just like Communism is taking the OSS too far

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