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Its not as bad as it seems, I know you might say eventually this will turn every computer into a microsoft-worshipping pile of crap that checks if you have a ...
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  1. #1
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    TCPA conspiracy nuts.


    Its not as bad as it seems, I know you might say eventually this will turn every computer into a microsoft-worshipping pile of crap that checks if you have a "license" for every single file on your comp, and make it so it will only run windows or other TCPA-approved OS.

    anyways if you are too lazy to read the article this is basically what it says

    -There is nothing about it only booting windows, and the computer will always boot with the chip disabled, it is up to the operating system how it is supported.

    -It isnt much good for DRM, the chip is tamper proof but only from malicious software, but not from a hardware attack.

    http://www.research.ibm.com/gsal/tcpa/tcpa_rebuttal.pdf

    this could be good, to secure your linux machine, because the private-key never leaves the chip. all the chip does really is encrypt & decrypt stuff & hold a few keys, it doesnt verify the integrity of your operating system, it doesnt check your wind'ohz license. it doesnt check if you are running american-made industry-loving hardware and it is also incapable of mind-control

    anyway if you dont like how win'ohz uses the chip, all the more reason to switch to linux (and linux will definitly run on the machine).

  2. #2
    Linux Engineer Giro's Avatar
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    Re: TCPA conspiracy nuts.

    Quote Originally Posted by towel401
    -It isnt much good for DRM, the chip is tamper proof but only from malicious software, but not from a hardware attack.

    http://www.research.ibm.com/gsal/tcpa/tcpa_rebuttal.pdf
    I read that the fritz chip was going to be a co-chip at first(on the motherboard) but then the next generation will be incorperated into the CPU which makes it near tamper proof.

  3. #3
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    that would be a pain. especially when you get a new CPU, i think the removable daughter-board will be there for another while. makes sense

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  5. #4
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    **cough** Already being discussed here.
    Registered Linux user #384279
    Vector Linux SOHO 7

  6. #5
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    Re: TCPA conspiracy nuts.

    Quote Originally Posted by towel401
    Its not as bad as it seems
    Call me paranoid... but that's a line heared so many times before (check the history books)... That's something we tell cows before they're taken to the butcher

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    Re: TCPA conspiracy nuts.

    Quote Originally Posted by boba_fett
    That's something we tell cows before they're taken to the butcher
    lmao!

  8. #7
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    Re: TCPA conspiracy nuts.

    Quote Originally Posted by towel401
    -It isnt much good for DRM, the chip is tamper proof but only from malicious software, but not from a hardware attack..
    page 21 (page 27 of pdf) of the TCG Arhitercture Overview(pdf)
    TCF reaure the TPM be physicaly protected from tampering. This includes physically binding the TPM module to the other parts of the platform (eg motherboard) such that it cannot be easily disassembled and transferred to other platforms.. These mechanisms are intended to resist tampering. Tamper evidence measures are to be employed. Such measures enable detection of tampering upon physical inspection.
    It will stop you from touching the chip, and will "tell" on you if you do. It is no longer MY computer.
    ---------------------------------
    Quote Originally Posted by towel401
    There is nothing about it only booting windows, and the computer will always boot with the chip disabled, it is up to the operating system how it is supported.
    from page from page 24-25 (page 30-31 of pdf)
    When the platform begins operation, it is required to start at the RTM. The RTM is aware of itself and the other trusted building blocks (i.e. RTS and RTR). The TPM starting state is equivalent to system initialization state. When power-on startup occurs, the RTM is required to signal the TPM start its initialization process. The TPM initialization process includes a TPM self-test. The self-test determines if the TPM is functioning properly........As part of system initialization, measurements of platform components and configurations will be taken. Taking measurements will not detect unsafe configurations nor will it take action to prevent continuation of the initialization process. This responsibility rests with a suitable reference monitor such as an operating system. The operating system program loader is the next logical soft component to measure a program prior to loading it. Since the operating system helps enforce system integrity, it is reasonable for the program loader to both measure and enforce policies describing unacceptable software configuration state. Applications may contain policies describing trusted platform configurations and refuse or limit interaction with the platform as a consequence. Such bilateral measurement semantics may be extended to other platforms, thereby enabling distributed application measurement and enforcement. Application peers may entertain cross-checking prior to engaging in collaborative exchange as a safety precaution.
    Yes it is true that it will not halt the startup process because of hardware, but it is loaded before the OS and will help the OS halt because of hardware. It also can stop programs from interacting with your computer. It is no longer MY computer.
    ---------------------------------

    It is involed in all layers of the computer, from kernel to app.

    It goes on and on and on.
    Brilliant Mediocrity - Making Failure Look Good

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    And this is what has me somewhat concerned. Not so much from the obvious standpoint, but what happens when the business world is predominantly populated with these types of computers? Those of us that are still holding out will find that we can communicate with fewer and fewer machines as far as standards are concerned.
    Registered Linux user #384279
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  10. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by retired1af
    Those of us that are still holding out will find that we can communicate with fewer and fewer machines as far as standards are concerned.
    And that, related with the fact how Microsoft deals with standards, is something not realised by many. Like I said somewhere else, ignorance leads to indifference...

    And that, my fellow Penguinlovers, leads to the Darkside of the Source.

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    But this alliance is just between some of the large companies. By building in the fritz-chip, peaple with knowledge will start moving to AMD-prosessors and PowerPC prosessors instead, prosessors without fritz. Or maybe some new linux-friendly prosessors will show up in the markets, and suddenly microbloat and intel won't have any customers anymore, and then they can do whatever they want to with their prosessors and software, peaple wont use it anymore anyway.

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