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How would I go about doing this? My friend is going to let me have his Creative Nomad that has a failed hard drive in it. Do I just replace ...
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  1. #1
    Linux User George Harrison's Avatar
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    Fixing a failed hard drive in an mp3 player


    How would I go about doing this? My friend is going to let me have his Creative Nomad that has a failed hard drive in it. Do I just replace it and add an external hard drive (might get a bit pricey) or can I just fix the disc internally (mucho harder)? This is important to me because if I fix it I get to keep it, and I might just run Linux on it Guides, personal help, advice, etc. is all appreciated, thanks.
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  2. #2
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    Depends what kind of harddisk is inside.
    If it's the same as used in laptops, I'd change it.

    Of course, external ones can hold more megabytes (or terrabyte, read recently that there is a 1 terrabyte disk now)...

  3. #3
    Linux User George Harrison's Avatar
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    Not for sure... he's going to give it to me on Monday when I see him in class. I guess it's just a small abd generic hard drives that are used in mp3 players.


    Wow, a "Terabyte"? Move over gigabyte.
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  4. #4
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    A Terabyte is 1000GB
    Ma homeboy is Jesus himself.

  5. #5
    Linux User Krendoshazin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CoffeeMonster
    A Terabyte is 1000GB
    it's 1024GB, it's that because computers use a base-2 system, when they use a base-10 system then it'll be 1000GB

  6. #6
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    ahh yes of course, going up in binary numbers...
    Ma homeboy is Jesus himself.

  7. #7
    Linux User Krendoshazin's Avatar
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    hopefully in the future all computers will use a base-10 system, i believe there are some around but they're very expensive, binary is easy to represent as you can represent is as on/off, open/closed, or in the case of ram, voltage/no voltage. base-2 system computers used to be very expensive aswell untill the miniturization of the switch came about, the typical mobile phone these days is more powerfull than a computer which used to take up an entire room. it's just a case of time, something i look forward to

    also switching to a base-10 system will make computers much much faster, they won't have to waste time converting base-10 input to base-2, and then base-2 back to an understandable end-user result of base-10

    sorry if i took this topic off-topic, this is a subject that interests me very much, mind you this is the coffee lounge so it's somewhat expected

  8. #8
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    i'm pretty sure that the nomad uses a 2.5" laptop driver, so you will probably be able to open it up and replace the drive...

  9. #9
    Linux Enthusiast carlosponti's Avatar
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    the nomad uses a notebook drive my friend took his apart when he got a new mp3 player.
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  10. #10
    Linux User George Harrison's Avatar
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    Thanks for the info, I'll search for a cheap laptop drive to throw in.
    Registered Linux user #393103

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