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I've been using Slackware 10.0 with fluxbox 0.9.12 for some time and find it to be the best distro I've ever used (I haven't used all that many). But I've ...
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  1. #1
    Linux User zba78's Avatar
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    install arch linux?


    I've been using Slackware 10.0 with fluxbox 0.9.12 for some time and find it to be the best distro I've ever used (I haven't used all that many). But I've been reading a lot about arch linux recently and it's really taken my interest.

    Would any of you recommend trying arch out? Also I have a 1mb internet connection so would it be best to download the base install only and install the rest via ftp?

    Nothing wrong with my slack but I just feel like trying something else.
    Ubuntu Jaunty :: Arch Linux (current) :: Acer Aspire 1692WMLi

  2. #2
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    I never tried out pacman or something, I felt bad about leaving gentoo so I reinstalled gentoo after getting the base up... Just like in slack you can choose between premade kernels, but unlike slack you can choose to compile your own as a part of the install-process. Otherwise, the install looks pretty much like slack, and is ncurses-based.

    It includes both a source-based package-manager (ABS) and a binary-based one (Pacman).

  3. #3
    Linux Guru bryansmith's Avatar
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    Arch looks pretty cool. It sounds like a really fast distro (it is built for i686). I would love to give it a try but I might stick with Ubuntu for now. Pacman sounds like a good package management system as well.

    Bryan
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  5. #4
    Linux Guru Vergil83's Avatar
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    I installed it, it was nice, nothing particulary ground breaking IMHO. Pacman is like a mixture of slapt-get and apt-get. It takes some work to get it usable(much more work than slackware for example) and I am not sure if you can ever get kde or gnome installed (it did help start my love affair with xfce though ). I didn't notice a big speed difference. However, I am sure I will re-install if in the future (I erased it when I installed ubuntu a couple days ago.
    Brilliant Mediocrity - Making Failure Look Good

  6. #5
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    I've been using Arch since 0.5, and actually, recently switched from Enlightenment back to Fluxbox 0.9.12. The best comparison I can make is that it's Slackware with Apt-Get, but with the simplicity of pkgtool. I love everything from the init system to the package manager, there's really nothing to get in your way. But there's nothing to help, either, like Slackware with it's ncurses configuration tools.

    I don't think the installation is nothing like Slackware's, except that it's text based. It's a MUCH simpler install process, in and out in 5 minutes once you're familiar.

    Pacman is kind of like slapt-get, but you don't have to worry about the headaches involved in using a third party package tool with third party repositories and not quite standard packages. For the record, I do prefer Slackware's checkinstall for installing source. ABS has great potential, but it does little more than checkinstall at this point, so the extra effort isn't worth it.

    There are a few issues, though. For example, Pacman seems fast at first, but it slows down as you install more and more packages. The devs are discussing putting a database backend on it, which should help. Right now they're finishing up turning it into a library, getting rid of all the bash scripts and such, which will make it more versatile for frontends and such.
    The only other real problem I've had is that the other night I tried to sync my packages with not enough hard drive space. It downloaded all the files, unpacked severa, and then aborted the installation. So my packages were partially upgraded, but my installed package list was left unchanged. It also didn't amend my log, so I had to go through and figure out which packages were being upgraded, and force the upgrade. Some things still aren't right, I'll have to reinstall, but it's usable.
    Michael Salivar

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  7. #6
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    I don't think you should remove Slack, install Arch on another disc. I'm sure you'll want to use Slack again.
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  8. #7
    Linux User zba78's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fallen Angel
    I don't think you should remove Slack, install Arch on another disc. I'm sure you'll want to use Slack again.
    Oh yes I definately won't get rid of slack. I was going to overwrite my suse 9.1 personal installation (which I haven't used in many months now) and make use of the 15GB there.
    Ubuntu Jaunty :: Arch Linux (current) :: Acer Aspire 1692WMLi

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