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the new nforce 4 ultra/sli boards have SATA II ports which are desighned to allow two devices on one port. suposedly there are special conecters out there that allow you ...
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  1. #11
    Linux User benjamin20's Avatar
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    the new nforce 4 ultra/sli boards have SATA II ports which are desighned to allow two devices on one port. suposedly there are special conecters out there that allow you to do this but i havent seen any. plus the boards often come with an aditional sil 3114 chip wwhich adds 4 more sata 150 ports. so theoreticly you can have up to 12. but thats asuming you can find those connectors. and thats even asuming they are real.
    nVidia G-Force 6600GT (bfg) pci-e: amd 64 2000+ (939): 1024 corsair ram: 2X 80gb seagate harddisk SATA: plextor cd/dvd-read/write cdrom SATA

  2. #12
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    Hmm, sounds interesting. As far as I know, SATA controllers will allow you to have just one device attached to one controller, which there could be up to 4 or more controllers on one motherboard. I haven't gotten in SATA II yet, but seems like something to research. 12 devices...now that's a lot of hard drives.

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    As far as i know, the main difference b/w SATA and IDE is SATA transfers bits in a serial stream (1 after the other) instead of IDE's parralel transmission (1 bit a wire over 8 wires) Ive honestly still yet to grasp why thats faster, other than that SATA is using a direct bus to the hd, instead of IDE's use of the DMA channels (if im wrong on that, sorry for the misinformation, and please do correct me). Other than that, RAID is the only reason you would NEED 2 or more hds, and, just so *DEAD* knows, love the name btw, mirroring (raid1) is just what it sounds like, a mirrored image of the data being written to the second HD as a fault tolerance, stripping (raid0) is the data being written to both, in a Xbytes to hda, Xbytes to hdb pattern. Again, this is for fault tolerance, though im not to sure how this is that effective, seeing as if you lost hdb, wouldnt half the data be lost? Please feel free to comment on this, as i'd love to know the answer
    Jeff

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    Linux User benjamin20's Avatar
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    that is the problem when you loose hdb. you loose everyhting. but the advantage is 2X speed. (or theoretly anyway.) and i think serial ends up faster because there is almost no magnetic interference betweenthe wire as there is in parellel. in eide drives its fairly common to have to resend data from the hd to the mobo bacause of data couruption.
    nVidia G-Force 6600GT (bfg) pci-e: amd 64 2000+ (939): 1024 corsair ram: 2X 80gb seagate harddisk SATA: plextor cd/dvd-read/write cdrom SATA

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    cool... thx ben! makes sense. so is it raid5 that allows stripping and mirroring (and im assuming u need 4 drives to really take advantage of that.... i need a better job )
    Jeff

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    Linux Guru bigtomrodney's Avatar
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    RAID 5 is disk striping with parity, where there is disk striping across say 5 disks, but there is an overlap in the data, so you don't get full capacity but you get high speed access to disks and in the event of a disk failing you can just replace the disk and let the RAID rebuild itself. This is striping with parity. In a normal stripe RAID you don't get an fault tolerance, it's purely for speed of access.

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    Linux Guru AlexK's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by guitarinvegas
    cool... thx ben! makes sense. so is it raid5 that allows stripping and mirroring (and im assuming u need 4 drives to really take advantage of that
    you can achieve RAID 5 with 3 drives also e.g. 2x 80 G hdd in RAID 0 and one 160G hdd for backup.

    Quote Originally Posted by guitarinvegas
    Ive honestly still yet to grasp why thats faster, other than that SATA is using a direct bus to the hd, instead of IDE's use of the DMA channels
    The reason why SATA is faster is that everything is synched to the one clock rather than PATA's 8 clocks. Imagine this you have 8 people running a fixed distance. You tell these 8 people that they have to arrive at the finish at exactly the same time none should be early and no one should be late (achieving this is more impossible than it looks). That is why with PATA, you will have to send and resend data more times thus decreasing the efficiency.

    Now replace the 8 runners with one runner. You tell this runner that he/she need to reach the finish line in X seconds. This is accomplished much more easily.

    And another advantage of serial communication is that theoretically you can send and recieve at the same time. whereas with parallel, you have to send data, then wait etc.

    hope this clears up things for you

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