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ok i set up another account how do i make sure its safe?...
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  1. #11
    Just Joined! JCaserta's Avatar
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    ok i set up another account how do i make sure its safe?

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by JCaserta
    ok i set up another account how do i make sure its safe?
    just run it as your normal user and not as root...

    PS: How comes you didn't have a normal user already(the installer should have done this for you)?

  3. #13
    Just Joined! JCaserta's Avatar
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    it asked me if i wanted to and i said no, wasnt aware its that big of a deal, i am a new convert from winblows.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by JCaserta
    it asked me if i wanted to and i said no, wasnt aware its that big of a deal, i am a new convert from winblows.
    I see...
    Just remember for the future, it is a big deal(and not only for security, it also makes life as an admin a lot easier).

  5. #15
    Linux Engineer psic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jens
    PS: I always liked those funny distro comments...
    Me too. It just makes you smile. I wish more distros told you when you did stupid things. Windows just hits you on the head with a club and commits suicide.

    Hmmm... I can hear it now, with Hal's voice:
    I'm sorry, Dave. I can't do that. It's just too stupid.

    Stumbling around the 'net:
    www.cloudyuseful.com

  6. #16
    Just Joined! JCaserta's Avatar
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    well this is for my home pc, so not really an admin factor as i am the only one to ue it

  7. #17
    oz
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    hehe... don't know if they still do this or not, but Mandrake used to have a very bright blood-red background when you'd log into X as root.

    It was so alarming and ugly you really couldn't work in it effectively.

    These days, it's very rare indeed for me to see my boxes from within root.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by JCaserta
    well this is for my home pc
    That makes you it's head admin

  9. #19
    Linux Guru budman7's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ozar
    hehe... don't know if they still do this or not, but Mandrake used to have a very bright blood-red background when you'd log into X as root.

    It was so alarming and ugly you really couldn't work in it effectively.

    These days, it's very rare indeed for me to see my boxes from within root.
    When I used to use SUSE 9.1 personal, when you logged in as root, they had a red background with with lit bombs.
    How to know if you are a geek.
    when you respond to "get a life!" with "what's the URL?"
    - Birger

    New users read The FAQ

  10. #20
    Linux User Krendoshazin's Avatar
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    not being root has got nothing to do with local security, although that does play a part in the big picture it's not the real issue at hand. if you know the design of linux you'll know that the kernel is designed to be as mininal part of the system as possible, keeping everything else outside the kernel as modules, this goes with the saying "if it can be done outside the kernel, it must be done outside the kernel".

    in the grand design of things, all things are executed with the same permissions as the user, this severely reduces any programs ability to do damage to the system or for anyone to use the programs to gain full access, so when you execute a program it inherits your permissions, if there's a file you can't read or write to, neither can the program.
    this kind of design means that your system is no longer vulnerable to "full systems access" through the use of an exploit on, for example, a kernel level image renderer.
    to run things as root would be like leaving the keys in your car and not expecting anyone to steal it, root has access to -everything-, literally, there isn't a single thing out of root's control and is the reason it's seen as an "almighty" status.

    root should only be used for maintenance and administrative purposes, and even then with as minimal contact as possible, only using it as a per needed basis. there's times when you'll need to 'su' to get something done, but most things can be done with 'sudo'

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