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Originally Posted by genesus Originally Posted by Vergil83 Originally Posted by genesus Hopefully our Patriot Act will expand its power to provide the same protection here that is enjoyed in ...
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  1. #11
    Linux Guru Vergil83's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by genesus
    Quote Originally Posted by Vergil83
    Quote Originally Posted by genesus
    Hopefully our Patriot Act will expand its power to provide the same protection here that is enjoyed in China.
    which would make this conversation illegal
    As it should be, we should spend the time praising our government and paying for freedom...since it isn't free
    Brilliant Mediocrity - Making Failure Look Good

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by genesus
    Quote Originally Posted by Vergil83
    Quote Originally Posted by genesus
    Hopefully our Patriot Act will expand its power to provide the same protection here that is enjoyed in China.
    which would make this conversation illegal
    As it should be, we should spend the time praising our government and paying for freedom...since it isn't free
    Shhhh!!!! Don't give them any ideas. Big Brother is watching.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vergil83
    Quote Originally Posted by Santa's little helper
    Haven't we covered this already here ?
    that didn't cover MS
    Yes it did.The link JoeB posted covered Mshit , Yahoo and Google.

  4. #14
    Linux User Krendoshazin's Avatar
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    this is just microsoft's attempt to say to china, "hey, look, we're on your side, we're not such bad people", in china microsoft have a very bad name and right now are finding it very hard to get a foothold in the market when linux is very much favoured, so they're taking every opportunity to try and get into their good books, it's quite disgusting how low they'll go

  5. #15
    Linux User benjamin20's Avatar
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    well as it seems that its wrong for them to go and restrict freedoms and such, its not exactly like its there choice. you cant do buissness in a country without obaying its laws. if the laws say that these words cant be spoken than you just have to ban them. its not your fault because its not your choice. besides. if microsoft wasnt the one doing it than someone else would.

    of course we all know billy is having a blast banning these chinese people.
    nVidia G-Force 6600GT (bfg) pci-e: amd 64 2000+ (939): 1024 corsair ram: 2X 80gb seagate harddisk SATA: plextor cd/dvd-read/write cdrom SATA

  6. #16
    Linux User Krendoshazin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by benjamin20
    well as it seems that its wrong for them to go and restrict freedoms and such, its not exactly like its there choice. you cant do buissness in a country without obaying its laws. if the laws say that these words cant be spoken than you just have to ban them. its not your fault because its not your choice. besides. if microsoft wasnt the one doing it than someone else would.

    of course we all know billy is having a blast banning these chinese people.
    what laws, this is the internet, the laws being enforced are chinese laws and microsoft is an american company, just because you have one countries citizens accessing the server doesn't suddenly mean that you have to obey their rules, just like a website can't be shut down if one country happens to disagree with it but it's running in a different country where the law allows it.
    this is purely a way to gain their trust and try to get into the market, they've been looking for a way to do that for ages and this is the perfect opportunity for them to do just that.

    let's say for the sake of argument that america abolished freedom of speech, i'm in england, does that mean i'd have to shut down a website i run that offers people to make freedom of speech if i'm running it in this country? of course not, and neither do i have to stop american's comming onto the site and using it to express freedom of speech. this is exactly why the internet is such a threat to them, because it offers a loophole.

    to say they have no choice in the matter couldn't be further from the truth, this is purely thier own doing

  7. #17
    Linux User cayalee's Avatar
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    no, i dont think it works like that, i think the government has control over all traffic entering and leaving the chinese ISP servers. if microsoft want to be able to be accessed by these ISP servers then they have to comply with chinese law, which in business terms is perfectly legal. you have to obey the local laws when setting up multination companies such as MS. after all they make software, they are not a political organisation and they would have no legal right and no leverage to convince the chinese otherwise.
    You know, aliens are going to come to earth in 50 years and kill the hell out of us for DDoSing their networks with this SETI crap
    registered linux user #388463

  8. #18
    Linux User Krendoshazin's Avatar
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    it does work like that, that's the whole point, if it didn't they wouldn't of needed all chinese websites to register with them and also this wouldn't have been an issue in the first place. what's happened is the chinese government tried to do it one way, and then microsoft came along and said, "perhaps we have a better soloution", this has got nothing to do with local law.

    like i said the internet offers a loophole, the laws only cover what a chinese citizen says in their own country, not on the internet. untill a law is passed that says otherwise then it is not local law, yes, they have the power to take down websites hosted in their own country that they consider to be abusing the rules, but not what citizens are accessing from other countries.

    you might say, so what, they're just trying to expand their business. yes that's the whole point, they expand their business in any way they can, using a countries citizens who try to gain basic human rights as leverage in order to gain favour with the usage of their software. if software had to obey local law like you think they're doing here, then this wouldn't be an issue in the first place either.

    these people deserve the rights that everyone takes for granted, and just because the government says so doesn't make it so, when that happens it's time to get a new government, and that's exactly what they're trying to suppress. to support that kind of r'eigime in order to "do business" only stengthens the severity of the fact of the kind of world upon which we live, things are not ok, it's time people started to wake up.

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