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off topic of the thread, but i have read you say you were a software engineer techiemoe, what kind of software do you write? what is a typical day like ...
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  1. #1
    Linux Newbie jamey112's Avatar
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    off topic of the thread, but i have read you say you were a software engineer techiemoe, what kind of software do you write? what is a typical day like for you? (in college right now, wanted to make sureim going in the right direction)
    Today I fell and felt better, Just knowing this matters, I just feel stronger and SHARPER!!!, Found a box of sharp objects, What a beautiful THING!!! Box of Sharp Objects - The Used

  2. #2
    Linux Guru techieMoe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jamey112
    off topic of the thread, but i have read you say you were a software engineer techiemoe, what kind of software do you write? what is a typical day like for you? (in college right now, wanted to make sureim going in the right direction)
    In general, I write java code for a very large application that is being built to replace an existing application on my department's mainframe. I've been moved around to different teams depending on our needs at the time, so right now I'm writing ad-hoc utilities for my team to use while developing. I develop for the developers, I guess you could say.

    A typical day for me usually consists of checking in with my team lead in the morning and finding out if he has any special requests or system-critical things for me to work on, and if not I have an ongoing piece of software I've written that's being used right now by my team, so I work on maintaining that and fixing bugs as they come up. I'm also in the process of refactoring (basically rewriting with a better structure) this utility so that future enhancements to it can be done easier.

    I check files in and out using our sourcecode management tool, IBM Rational ClearCase, and develop using IBM's Eclipse IDE. Other teams in my department deal with use cases and project artifacts using the Rational Unified Software Development Process (it's similar to the waterfall or iterative model if you're familiar with that).

    I don't really have "deadlines" at my job, but that's mostly because I work for local government, and nothing is pressing when dealing with the government. Haha.
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  3. #3
    Linux Newbie jamey112's Avatar
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    sounds like a cool job. if ya dont mind me asking, feel free to not even reply, but do you make alright money?
    Today I fell and felt better, Just knowing this matters, I just feel stronger and SHARPER!!!, Found a box of sharp objects, What a beautiful THING!!! Box of Sharp Objects - The Used

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    Linux User benjamin20's Avatar
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    hey techiemoe. i plan on going the rout of sofware programer myself. but i dont want to be put in a cubicle in a room with a bunch of cubicles. and in each cubicle is some pinhead moron who back in his chidhood was a !337 |-|/-\><()12 |\/|()(|Z()12. and i dont want to be writing software that when you try to explain it to someone sounds like the most boring thing ever.

    i would probobly enjoy writing games. so what exactly do i have to do to stay away from the leet haxxxor modzzzors?

    (i swear if i have to listen to some guy talk avout what he did the night befor on counterstrike ill just blow up and take them all with me.)
    nVidia G-Force 6600GT (bfg) pci-e: amd 64 2000+ (939): 1024 corsair ram: 2X 80gb seagate harddisk SATA: plextor cd/dvd-read/write cdrom SATA

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    Linux Guru techieMoe's Avatar
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    @jamey112 - Well, I just bought a new car. I think I make a decent living. I'd get paid more in a private sector job but I like the job security working for a government agency.

    Quote Originally Posted by benjamin20
    hey techiemoe. i plan on going the rout of sofware programer myself. but i dont want to be put in a cubicle in a room with a bunch of cubicles.
    Best of luck on that. Cubicles are pretty standard in the private sector software market, judging from friends I have that work in it. I don't work in a cubicle; we have tables so we can spread out our dual-monitor setups on them.

    i would probobly enjoy writing games. so what exactly do i have to do to stay away from the leet haxxxor modzzzors?
    Your best bet to stay away from those people is to stay away from game programming all together. I tried that route at first and found that unless you already have experience developing software in some field it's near impossible to get even an entry-level position at most game companies (I talked to EA, Microsoft, Bungie, and Acclaim before they went under).

    I'd recommend you hone your game programming skills on your own time and find a software job you can use to pay your bills. Any company will look more favorably on someone with more experience, regardless of what field that experience came from. You'd probably be surprised to know that the same processes you use at the "boring" job are the ones they use at EA or Bungie. Software development experience can do you well anywhere you decide to move.
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    Linux User benjamin20's Avatar
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    ok, so dont go into game programing. now that i think about iti think most games are halfassed and i dont want to be a part of that. but i want something respectable that lets me do a good job. i dont want to halfass to meet some deadline. its not the cubicle i ahve a problem with, its the cubicle and the moron.

    i dont see why you do java programing though. i thought it was kinda slow and limited. would you rather be doing c prgraming or did java seem like the perfect iidea for whatever you are doing.
    nVidia G-Force 6600GT (bfg) pci-e: amd 64 2000+ (939): 1024 corsair ram: 2X 80gb seagate harddisk SATA: plextor cd/dvd-read/write cdrom SATA

  8. #7
    Linux Guru techieMoe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by benjamin20
    i dont see why you do java programing though. i thought it was kinda slow and limited. would you rather be doing c prgraming or did java seem like the perfect iidea for whatever you are doing.
    Haha. Well, I have a degree in C and C++. Let me first dispel one myth: you (the employee) do not get the luxury of choosing what language you use for your company's software 99% of the time. If you're an entry-level programmer, forget it.

    When I came to this job they asked me if I had object-oriented programming experience (C++) and I did. They then taught me Java (very easy swap from C++ by the way).

    As for why we're using it, we are writing an application that uses thin-client browser-based interaction with the user that offers the ability to access databases that speak 3 different languages. Before I was hired, a large committee got together with several vendors (Microsoft was one, with .NET) and they decided the best course of action was to use Java and HTML/XML/CSS/Struts for our application.

    Different programming languages have their usefulness. Were we writing software strictly for local fat clients, we probably wouldn't be using Java. Were we writing software for the mainframe (which half my department does) we'd be using COBOL and Model 204. Were I writing utilities for our server I'd use C. It all depends on what you need.

    Would I rather be doing something else? Maybe. Am I learning a lot at this job and enjoying it anyway? You bet.
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    I tried that route at first and found that unless you already have experience developing software in some field it's near impossible to get even an entry-level position at most game companies (I talked to EA, Microsoft, Bungie, and Acclaim before they went under).
    One should not seek a gameprogrammer-job at Microsoft or EA , especialy EA, where there's one big guy with a big drum and you have to ram the keyboard along with the rhythm, programmers there are extremely underpaid and the quality of games produced is ****, I don't blame the programmers for that, I blame management(who else?).
    In Delft there is a small company, haven't been able to locate the building itself yet but I do know the street where it is based, and this company has created games like "Age of Wonders", I'd be a fool if I did not apply there for a job, maybe as an internship for academy, which I'll be doing next year.

    So if you want to be a gameprogrammer, but not want to work with lot's of morons, go to the small companies that create "intelligent games" (anything not involving big explosions and rocketlaunchers).

  10. #9
    Linux Engineer d38dm8nw81k1ng's Avatar
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    i've read about the game programming industry. i've no intention of being a professional programmer (money making is my strongest area ) but would want to learn about it in my spare time. just so i know, is c++ completely platform independant? i ask because i have some literature for learning c++ but it is windows oriented[/quote]
    Here's why Linux is easier than Windows:
    Package Managers! Apt-Get and Portage (among others) allow users to install programs MUCH easier than Windows can.
    Hardware Drivers. In SuSE, ALL the hardware is detected and installed automatically! How is this harder than Windows' constant disc changing and rebooting?

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    Linux Guru techieMoe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by d38dm8nw81k1ng
    i've read about the game programming industry. i've no intention of being a professional programmer (money making is my strongest area ) but would want to learn about it in my spare time. just so i know, is c++ completely platform independant? i ask because i have some literature for learning c++ but it is windows oriented
    Yes, C and C++ are completely platform independent. Your literature, however, may not be. Unfortunately a lot of C++ programming books (though none of the SAMS Teach Yourself or WROX series that I'm aware of) make assumptions that you'll be developing in Microsoft Visual Studio, which is not a standards-compliant IDE.
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