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The harder you work in school, the easier your adult life will be. The less you get paid, the harder you work for it. And, the more grief you suffer ...
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  1. #11
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    The harder you work in school, the easier your adult life will be.

    The less you get paid, the harder you work for it. And, the more grief you suffer doing it.

    Once you get out of college, a 3.5 GPA opens a lot of doors.

    An old guy making real life observations.

    Jeff
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  2. #12
    Linux Newbie jamey112's Avatar
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    Re: always do great in high school

    Quote Originally Posted by bidi
    Quote Originally Posted by jamey112
    my high school gpa was a 1.85
    And they let you graduate! You're lucky!! In my high school if you had less than a 2.0GPA you couldn't graduate.

    Nothing wrong with community colleges, I work in one! Just don't mess it up there, or you won't be able to transfer out.
    hell yea they did. i was failing 3 out of 4 of my classes the last smester of my senior year (the 1 i was passing was powerpoint, lol) and they all passed me with a 71. the highest grade i had 2 weeks before finals was a 52. lol. one day my guidance counselor came and got me out of class while i was passed out on a bunch of purple xanax, i woke, got up out of my desk, fell in the floor, laughed my ass off, then went to her office and told her if i didnt graduate i was moving to mexico to sell marquritas wearing flip flops on the beach for the rest of my life. next thing i know, im graduating. lol
    Today I fell and felt better, Just knowing this matters, I just feel stronger and SHARPER!!!, Found a box of sharp objects, What a beautiful THING!!! Box of Sharp Objects - The Used

  3. #13
    Linux Newbie deek's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jlgreer1
    The harder you work in school, the easier your adult life will be.

    The less you get paid, the harder you work for it. And, the more grief you suffer doing it.

    Once you get out of college, a 3.5 GPA opens a lot of doors.

    An old guy making real life observations.

    Jeff
    I agree with your first two points, but my experience has shown that most employers don't give a flying flip what your GPA was in college (or high school). I am not saying getting decent grades is important, but I highly doubt you are going to see many more doors based solely on your GPA. Maybe right out of college it may be a minor talking point in a interview, but past that, I wouldn't put much weight to it.

    I was one of those kids in high school and college that didn't try very hard, but things came easy. Graduated with honors from HS and did really well (3.3 GPA) my first year and a half in college...but then I had too much fun on the social side and just said screw classes:) Not something I would recommend!

    But, as one or two said previously, if you can motivate yourself and put in a lot of hard work on your own, you can really learn a lot and make something out of yourself, it is just much easier, to do so when in school, than after you drop out and learn a lesson...
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  4. #14
    Linux Guru techieMoe's Avatar
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    My English teacher my senior year of high school summed this up pretty well, I think:

    "Once you get your diploma, no one cares what you did in high school. All of you that were popular, that were valedictorians, that were captains of this team or that, won't matter. You start with a clean slate in college.

    Once you get your degree, no one cares what you did in college. Your degree may or may not mean anything for the job you get; most companies train new employees under the assumption they know nothing, and they're usually right. You also start with a clean slate in the work world."

    That's not to say that I would ever advocate that anyone just not go to high school or college. IMO that's just ignorant (no offense to those who dropped out). There is no harm that can come of doing well in HS and college and getting your degree. Just my two cents.
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  5. #15
    Linux Newbie jamey112's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by techieMoe
    My English teacher my senior year of high school summed this up pretty well, I think:

    "Once you get your diploma, no one cares what you did in high school. All of you that were popular, that were valedictorians, that were captains of this team or that, won't matter. You start with a clean slate in college.
    unless your gpa doesnt meet the requirements of the school and they are *****es and wont let you in.
    Today I fell and felt better, Just knowing this matters, I just feel stronger and SHARPER!!!, Found a box of sharp objects, What a beautiful THING!!! Box of Sharp Objects - The Used

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by jamey112
    Quote Originally Posted by techieMoe
    I'd like to add that even after doing very well in high school, many very promising students drink their future away in college as well. Keep up that studious behavior in college!
    i took care of that already. drank smoked ate snorted etc my way through high school, now that i actually want to do good in school the f****s wont let me in. im so pissed.
    Many upper echelon schools do not look at grades at all. The university that I teach at is comparable to many Ivy leagues and if your SATs are high enough, grades do not matter at all...persevere, and remember, grades do not matter in the least...I don't know how many times I've had to give poor grades to students who have never had anything below an A in their lives...its more about what you take with you, what you learn, and how much you ruminate.
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  7. #17
    Linux Guru fingal's Avatar
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    This thread is really interesting to me. I did quite badly at school. There was no tradition of sitting exams in my family, and I was brought up in a rural area, where expectations for the future were low and academic achievement was an alien idea.

    After a lot of dead end jobs I decided to try night school. I met a lot of people along the way who encouraged me, and more or less said, "Do it! You just need to keep trying." After 'learning how to learn' from a lot of books which I read on that subject, I ended up with a good honours degree from a good university. I look back and think, 'I did it!'.

    I can't tell you how many times I screwed up - But I got more than one second chance. It's been hard, but I'm very satisfied with what I achieved. You can do the same (whoever you are) ... I know because I've been there. You need to find the vision and determination to achieve your goals, but once you are inspired to do something, nothing can stop you
    I am always doing that which I can not do, in order that I may learn how to do it. - Pablo Picasso

  8. #18
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    Perfectly summarized fingal!, many "non-traditional" students perform much better and seem to have much more critical and analytic thought than straight-through students.
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  9. #19
    Linux User George Harrison's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by techieMoe
    My English teacher my senior year of high school summed this up pretty well, I think:

    "Once you get your diploma, no one cares what you did in high school. All of you that were popular, that were valedictorians, that were captains of this team or that, won't matter. You start with a clean slate in college.

    Once you get your degree, no one cares what you did in college. Your degree may or may not mean anything for the job you get; most companies train new employees under the assumption they know nothing, and they're usually right. You also start with a clean slate in the work world."
    My football coach said the exact same thing. In the summer before going into Frosh year we had to go to summer hell, you guessed it pretty much the entire summer with just running and puking.. it was fun. Anyhoo, the first day we show up the coach said that nobody cares what you did in middle school, this is high school and you're a freshman - clean slate.

    I got a 2.8 first semester of frosh year and 2 something the second semester so I'm busting my ass for sophmore year, being grounded sucks - my dad took my slave drive, formatted it and is keeping it, my master drive was formatted and I am now using XP
    Slacking is no option for me right now, if I work myself and concentrate I know I can get a 3 + Sophmore year and I might be able to show a college that I did screw up Frosh year but then I pulled my head out of my ass and actually got back on track.

    Although I did not fail any of my classes I did screw up, I'm taking two summer school classes right now.
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  10. #20
    Linux Guru techieMoe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by genesus
    Perfectly summarized fingal!, many "non-traditional" students perform much better and seem to have much more critical and analytic thought than straight-through students.
    Which is not to say "traditional" students don't do well also. Learning sometimes just needs to be tailored to a students' specific needs rather than just catering to the lowest common denominator (as US public schools are notorious for doing).

    I'm what you'd probably consider a "traditional" student; I did very well in primary and secondary school, and also did well in college. However I was raised by two multiple college graduates so that probably contributed.

    I did of course consider the vast majority of things I learned in high school to be worthless, and a lot of it did indeed turn out as such. The thing that ended up being most important was what I did outside of classes. I taught myself to program at a young age (thanks to my father's encouragement) and it ended up landing me a career.
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