Find the answer to your Linux question:
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 23
Good reads, and well put. I agree with most of the points presented....
Enjoy an ad free experience by logging in. Not a member yet? Register.
  1. #11
    Linux Guru techieMoe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    9,496

    Good reads, and well put. I agree with most of the points presented.
    Registered Linux user #270181
    TechieMoe's Tech Rants

  2. #12
    Linux User George Harrison's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Pepperland
    Posts
    445
    Quote Originally Posted by techieMoe
    Quote Originally Posted by George Harrison
    When I get older I would love to work with computers but I personally hate math, I cannot work with it or reason with it.
    Ah! Not so! I too hate math and did horrendously at it. I am however quite good at logic. The two are not necessarily interdependent. Despite popular opinion, not all aspects of computer science require you to use or even know complex math on a day to day basis. Programming, for instance, relies mostly on critical thinking and logic skills. If you're good at breaking down problems into smaller, manageable tasks, the syntax of the code is an afterthought. The most math I use writing Java,C, or C++ programs day to day is basic algebra.
    Thanks for the info. I would really like to go to Berkely and study computer science or computer engineering but I never thought I could do it unless I was really great at math, thanks moe.
    Registered Linux user #393103

  3. #13
    Linux Newbie
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    138
    yeah..........my friends in computer engineering rarely use advanced mathematics..............on the other hand, in E E, we use mathematics on daily basis.............the most advanced level of mathematics we reached were complex analysis and intro to differential calculus.............
    regards,
    ordoni

  4. $spacer_open
    $spacer_close
  5. #14
    Linux Guru techieMoe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    9,496
    Quote Originally Posted by George Harrison
    Thanks for the info. I would really like to go to Berkely and study computer science or computer engineering but I never thought I could do it unless I was really great at math, thanks moe.
    Don't get me wrong, most computer science programs will have advanced math in their curriculum (for whatever misguided reason) but if I was able to tough it out and pass you should be okay. It's usually 2 or 3 classes. Just remember when you actually get to the programming aspect you won't use any of it, so just focus on passing the class and moving on.

    As for computer engineering...*shudders* Any kind of engineering is mostly all math.
    Registered Linux user #270181
    TechieMoe's Tech Rants

  6. #15
    Linux User George Harrison's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Pepperland
    Posts
    445
    Wow, and you would think that there would be less math in engineering than in science, hmm...

    I am definately willing to work hard and do whatever I can now, I was really thinking about scrapping the idea of going into computer science because I knew my brain would be melted by math that I haven't even heard about yet I guess that's not the case anymore, I am pretty much an Algebra guru, when it comes to Triginometry or higher I'm a bit stuck..
    Registered Linux user #393103

  7. #16
    Linux Newbie deek's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Fort Wayne, IN
    Posts
    248
    Well, I am of the firm belief that you can hone your skills and become quite a good programmer without having to go to school. Granted, I think the road to becoming a developer is quite long without that type of degree, but that doesn't mean you have to stop enjoying programming and computers.

    I work in a financial company and while I am not a programmer. But, because I can, I find tons of things that I can automate because I do know programming, so I get to do it all the time. Certainly different than being a software developer for a living, but the same skill sets are being used and it still makes me happy.

    I would have to agree, math is not a huge deal to most programming. Unfortunately, the uni I went to for comp sci had it in the math department so I had to take a ton of math. But, on a day to day basis, it truly is all about logic, problem solving and breaking things down into smaller pieces.

    And, I really don't think you need to finish a degree program in comp sci in order to get those skills. Once you "understand" the basics, as moe put it, all the syntax of a particular language is easy. Plus, programming skills help in about any type of job you will ever get paid for!!!

    So, stick to you current degree program, finish it and keep working on your programming/computer skills on the side!!!
    Join the Open Source Revolution. Support GNU/Linux.

    Find me at: www.deeksworld.com
    Registered GNU/Linux User #395777

  8. #17
    Linux Newbie
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Tunisia
    Posts
    112
    Quote Originally Posted by deek
    So, stick to you current degree program, finish it and keep working on your programming/computer skills on the side!!!
    Thank you a lot

    I'll try to continue studying computer engineering but if I don't succeed,I'll

    get your advice it is cool too ,at least I don't have other choice.

    About money it doesn't interest me I just want something that I

    love
    \"hackers build, crackers break them \"

    ES Raymond

  9. #18
    Linux Enthusiast
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    522
    Quote Originally Posted by George Harrison
    I would really like to go to Berkely and study computer science or computer engineering but I never thought I could do it unless I was really great at math, thanks moe.
    I would like to share my experience.

    I believe that you can do it.
    I used to hate math too. That's because I approached it with a wrong question "why" (why it works this way? why I cannot do this or do that?). I had a feeling that I could never understand math and be good in it . That changed when I approached math with a question "how". It does not matter "why", but "how" the problem can be solved. That is when logic skills come into play. You devide a problem into parts and solve them piece by piece. If you give it some time, you will solve the problem, and through practice you will learn the rest of the math. I think that learning math is a matter of approach, persistance, and time. I am not saying that I am good in math, but I know that I can do it if I have to.

    Pavlo

  10. #19
    Linux Newbie
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Tunisia
    Posts
    112
    As for me I think that math make life better because it is a "sport" for

    our brains
    \"hackers build, crackers break them \"

    ES Raymond

  11. #20
    Linux Newbie
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Tunisia
    Posts
    112
    About this isuue I'm asking the one of the most famous hacker Paul

    Graham and he tell me that :

    " You don't have to study programming in school to learn to

    program. If you don't get into the school you want, just

    keep programming anyway. Most hackers learn to program by

    programming, not by being taught how by teachers. --pg"

    Maybe (this e-mail) can help you too that's why I'm posting it, and you

    can also visiting his web site for more information:

    http://www.paulgraham.com
    \"hackers build, crackers break them \"

    ES Raymond

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •