Find the answer to your Linux question:
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3
Results 21 to 27 of 27
So from what I've read from both sides, what I do every day (run games, surf the net, develop software), RAID isn't useful. However if my everyday tasks included something ...
Enjoy an ad free experience by logging in. Not a member yet? Register.
  1. #21
    Linux Engineer LondoJowo's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Richmond, TX
    Posts
    804

    So from what I've read from both sides, what I do every day (run games, surf the net, develop software), RAID isn't useful. However if my everyday tasks included something like capturing video or working with high-volume multimedia it would. Does that about sum it up?
    That's about it in a nutshell. Now for Raid 1 and other fault tolerant arrays are good if you have data you can't afford to lose, such as a database or mission critical server.

    Thank you both for keeping it about facts rather than resorting to flames.
    There's no reason to resort to flames or name calling, even if you are an abuser :P
    Dell Precision T7400 Workstation
    Dual 3.33Ghz Xeon "Harpertown" Core
    16GB PC5300 DDR2 ECC CL5
    BFG GeForce GTX 285 OC 2GB
    X-Fi Platinum
    HP w2408 24" Monitor
    Dual Boot:openSUSE 11.2/Win 7 Ultimate

  2. #22
    Linux User IsaacKuo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Baton Rouge, LA, USA
    Posts
    406
    Quote Originally Posted by LondoJowo
    Raid 0 makes a huge difference when capturing and encoding video, not to mention having 2GB of ram also is helpful on the encoding side as well.
    For most people, on-the-fly compression of captured video is all they'll ever need or want (i.e. for an HTPC). Uncompressed video is a niche requirement even for video pros.

    With on-the-fly compression or general video encoding (i.e. DVD rip or reencoding video), the process is CPU limited rather than disk speed limited.

    Quote Originally Posted by LondoJowo
    I agree having the scratch folder on the Raid 0 for photo/graphic editing is great too but I would never place the swap(page) file on the array as it would cause major problems if the array failed.
    Huh? It basically means your image editor application crashes. That is all. You lose any unsaved work, of course, but that's the reason you should regularly save. If you need to continue working and can't be bothered to replace the failed drive at the time, you just point the pagefile somewhere else (on a working partition).

    [Edit:] Oh, I see the point of confusion. I'm not talking about the swap partition(s), but rather the application specific "page file" that The GIMP uses (and I'm pretty sure Photoshop also uses).

    Note that with Linux, there's never a need to put swap in a RAID0. It automatically stripes multiple swap partitions if it finds more than one anyway.
    Isaac Kuo, ICQ 29055726 or Yahoo mechdan

  3. #23
    Linux User
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Peterborough, UK
    Posts
    379
    Quote Originally Posted by LondoJowo
    Now for Raid 1 and other fault tolerant arrays are good if you have data you can't afford to lose, such as a database or mission critical server.
    Or a really important save game... :P
    \"I am, after all,\" said Pooh, \"a bear of very little brain.\"
    MY PC: Athlon XP64 3000+ on a Asus K8V-X mobo w/1GB of non-descript RAM. AGP - GeForce 2 MX400. PCI - Creative Live! 5.1 soundcard. 140 GB and 120 GB SATA WD drives.

  4. #24
    Linux Engineer LondoJowo's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Richmond, TX
    Posts
    804
    I guess we're talking about a different page file, I'm referring to the Windows page file, if a drive failure occurs and the page file is lost it can prevent Windows from starting again. I had a Raid 0 array fail that had the pagefile on it and would get BSOD's until I went into safe mode and created a new pagefile.
    Dell Precision T7400 Workstation
    Dual 3.33Ghz Xeon "Harpertown" Core
    16GB PC5300 DDR2 ECC CL5
    BFG GeForce GTX 285 OC 2GB
    X-Fi Platinum
    HP w2408 24" Monitor
    Dual Boot:openSUSE 11.2/Win 7 Ultimate

  5. #25
    Linux Engineer LondoJowo's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Richmond, TX
    Posts
    804
    Quote Originally Posted by Odd_Bloke
    Or a really important save game... :P
    Dell Precision T7400 Workstation
    Dual 3.33Ghz Xeon "Harpertown" Core
    16GB PC5300 DDR2 ECC CL5
    BFG GeForce GTX 285 OC 2GB
    X-Fi Platinum
    HP w2408 24" Monitor
    Dual Boot:openSUSE 11.2/Win 7 Ultimate

  6. #26
    Linux Engineer LondoJowo's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Richmond, TX
    Posts
    804
    [Edit:] Oh, I see the point of confusion. I'm not talking about the swap partition(s), but rather the application specific "page file" that The GIMP uses (and I'm pretty sure Photoshop also uses).
    That's what I call the scratch file, so we're both saying the same thing
    Dell Precision T7400 Workstation
    Dual 3.33Ghz Xeon "Harpertown" Core
    16GB PC5300 DDR2 ECC CL5
    BFG GeForce GTX 285 OC 2GB
    X-Fi Platinum
    HP w2408 24" Monitor
    Dual Boot:openSUSE 11.2/Win 7 Ultimate

  7. #27
    Linux User IsaacKuo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Baton Rouge, LA, USA
    Posts
    406
    Quote Originally Posted by LondoJowo
    I'm referring to the Windows page file, if a drive failure occurs and the page file is lost it can prevent Windows from starting again. I had a Raid 0 array fail that had the pagefile on it and would get BSOD's until I went into safe mode and created a new pagefile.
    Ah, I see. The way Linux (currently) does it, that particular sort of problem wouldn't occur. It just looks for as many swap partitions as it can find on bootup, and stripes them. I guess you could say that it forms a RAID0 out of them fresh on each bootup. If one of the drives with a swap partition crashes, then it'll take down the system, of course. But after removing the bad drive and rebooting, Linux isn't going to get confused looking for that "missing" swap partition.
    Isaac Kuo, ICQ 29055726 or Yahoo mechdan

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •