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So why is it on our printer paper? That's where the conspiracy theory comes in....
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  1. #21
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    So why is it on our printer paper? That's where the conspiracy theory comes in.

  2. #22
    Linux Guru Vergil83's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chopin1810
    Where? When? If they actually admitted to it then I'd think it would be front page news. Seriously. It would be quite a major discovery.
    Read the link I posted above.
    It's strictly a countermeasure to prevent illegal activity specific to counterfeiting," agency spokesman Eric Zahren said
    Quote Originally Posted by chopin1810
    Perhaps it isn't written by the ACLU, but they do rely on some data provided by them.
    EFF looked for the dots and found them. The ACLU thing is just how the government is using it.
    Quote Originally Posted by chopin1810
    So why is it on our printer paper? That's where the conspiracy theory comes in.
    When a document is printed, the dots are automatically printed onto the paper. Just think of automatic page number printing (except much smaller and you can't turn it off).
    Brilliant Mediocrity - Making Failure Look Good

  3. #23
    Linux Newbie ThoughtVelocity's Avatar
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    I found this link a little more helpful than some others on the subject.

    http://www.pcworld.com/news/article/0,aid,118664,00.asp

    It also appears that this Peter Crean fellow (Xerox color scientist) is definately a real person.
    "If you are out to describe the truth leave elegance to the tailor."
    -Einstein

  4. #24
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    Their's nothing "conspiracy" about this.
    This is already known for a long time and IMO it's indeed something that needs to stop.

  5. #25
    Linux Newbie daacosta's Avatar
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    its not really spying the printed documents just have markers incase people use it for counterfieting then they have a way to trace it back to the original owner that is if the printer wasnt stolen.
    Carlosponti

    This is still a problem for me neighbor (I am also OK if you know what I mean ) If we are going to trust that the information is used by the government solely for detecting counterfeit it would be OK with it but we come back to the fact that this is still some form of illegal surveillance. How would you feel about the fact that your phone is tapped? Maybe the government isn't going to use this information against you because you are not doing anything illegal, is that still ok? What if the government learns that you have a cousin making time overseas? what if the government learns that your aunt participated in protests during the 60s while you are applying for a job with the government? what if you have a disability? would you be comfortable letting people know about that? Even if what we are doing is not illegal it should at least remain private... I don't trust how is information pertaining me or my family is going to be used and the government has no business digging into that or tracking it in any manner...
    -D-

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  6. #26
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    It's not that hard to believe the US government wouldn't have instigated something like this at all. They could have easiy passed a bill that makes it a matter of policy to enforce American owned printer manufacturers to install this "national security feature" as a standard.

    After all they have had legislation in place for decades guararteing law enforment agencies access to any telephone line in their country. It's basically built into every carriers core infrastructure.

    The American government can and do anything they like under the guise of national security ...

  7. #27
    Linux Guru fingal's Avatar
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    What bothers me is a point made in one of the articles I read. Imagine you live in an oppressive society somewhere and you are a dissident. You decide to publish a pamphlet or an underground magazine criticising your government.

    Using the printer dots your government's secret service track you down. They come in the night when you are asleep: they take your family away ...

    It happens every day.

    Of course our money is nice and safe so that's ok.
    I am always doing that which I can not do, in order that I may learn how to do it. - Pablo Picasso

  8. #28
    Linux User PsypherPunk's Avatar
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    Am i right in thinking that this only affects Laser printers? Not Inkjet or lower standard?
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  9. #29
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    Thats a damn fine point !!!

    Viva low-med res backyard jouranism ...

  10. #30
    Linux Guru fingal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PsypherPunk
    Am i right in thinking that this only affects Laser printers? Not Inkjet or lower standard?
    Just laser afaik. Here's a link to work in progress.

    Edit: Just for interest, this article by the Economist might be worth a read. It suggests that anti-counterfeiting measures are very effective in the US, and that dollar bills have good existing security already designed in.

    It also mentions that, 'fewer than 0.02% of all dollar bills turn out to be fake'. Given that this is the case, why do laser printers need extra 'security'? Or are they going to claim that these 'secure' printers are a link in their chain of effective measures?

    The article is getting a little old, so perhaps things have changed?
    I am always doing that which I can not do, in order that I may learn how to do it. - Pablo Picasso

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