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This article on the BBC News website, discusses how a UK government campaign are advising users to secure their computers against viruses and spyware etc. Although viruses etc are not ...
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  1. #1
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    'Net users told to get safe online'


    This article on the BBC News website, discusses how a UK government campaign are advising users to secure their computers against viruses and spyware etc. Although viruses etc are not a new thing, I think it shows how out of control it has become when the government have to advise users to put antivirus programs on their PC's!

    Have a read and leave your comments on the website!

  2. #2
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    It should be Microsoft's job to do this. Not the government's. It's Microsoft's fault that this is such an issue. People can tell me that if Linux were as popular as Windows that there would be an equal amount of Linux viruses as Windows viruses. However, the pure design of UNIX doesn't really allow these things to occur. Windows is just one big security hole (and anybody is allowed to do anything, no matter how insecure that may be). I don't have much faith in modern computer users as most of them are dumb as rocks when it comes to this stuff. I can't change that. I can't change that John Doe still opens all the attachments he gets in his inbox. He's been told enough not to and if he doesn't get it now then there's no hope. But what I can do is have Microsoft clean up their operating system so we don't have to worry about these things as much. The first step is to simply get rid of the registry. It's the source of 80% of problems in Windows. Anyone can access it and bring down the whole system in one click. As for more steps: I think they should be obvious.

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    Linux User Stefann's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chopin1810
    It should be Microsoft's job to do this. Not the government's. It's Microsoft's fault that this is such an issue. People can tell me that if Linux were as popular as Windows that there would be an equal amount of Linux viruses as Windows viruses. However, the pure design of UNIX doesn't really allow these things to occur. Windows is just one big security hole (and anybody is allowed to do anything, no matter how insecure that may be). I don't have much faith in modern computer users as most of them are dumb as rocks when it comes to this stuff. I can't change that. I can't change that John Doe still opens all the attachments he gets in his inbox. He's been told enough not to and if he doesn't get it now then there's no hope. But what I can do is have Microsoft clean up their operating system so we don't have to worry about these things as much. The first step is to simply get rid of the registry. It's the source of 80% of problems in Windows. Anyone can access it and bring down the whole system in one click. As for more steps: I think they should be obvious.
    They're planning on making a (somewhat) fix for this in Vista, even if your account is a admin it will ask you for your password before preforming a operation needing admin privelages, but Linux/Unix/etc.. has had this for year(su) and a graphical one(KDE SU, etc..) since KDE and GNOME came out.
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    It's not enough to just have password protection. They need to adopt more of the traits that UNIX has. It's not a problem with people getting into the computer in person (non-network hacking, just stepping up to the computer and doing stuff), it's a problem with network security. Nothing is going to get better without improved network security.
    (anyway the admin password is probably gonna be stored in the registry just like all the other crucial data in windows. anybody who can convert hexadecimal to base 10 is gonna figure out a crack for this.)

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    Linux Engineer d38dm8nw81k1ng's Avatar
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    the problem is the attitude people have. half of the reason linux is perceived as "hard to use" is because of all the security measures it uses. people need to understand security and perform it as part of their daily lives, such as locking a car or your front door. ignoring security is exactly the same as this and until people start taking precautions security will be a major threat in any operating system. even *NIX is vulnerable to user who don't care about security and don't follow the rules (yes i'm talking to all you idiots who still log in as root).
    Here's why Linux is easier than Windows:
    Package Managers! Apt-Get and Portage (among others) allow users to install programs MUCH easier than Windows can.
    Hardware Drivers. In SuSE, ALL the hardware is detected and installed automatically! How is this harder than Windows' constant disc changing and rebooting?

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    Linux User benjamin20's Avatar
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    the only security mesures on linux i take are not loging in as root and not using hevaly modified source codes. (only gentoo modified code) and thats all i feel i need for a home setup. realy i dont know too much about security but i do know that just the way *nix sets up there file system hiarchy and permision system you can easily see how easy it is to implement security.
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    exactly. with unix it's pretty much set up for you. if you're super paranoid about security then you can modify it yourself. but you don't really need to.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by d38dm8nw81k1ng
    the problem is the attitude people have. half of the reason linux is perceived as "hard to use" is because of all the security measures it uses. people need to understand security and perform it as part of their daily lives, such as locking a car or your front door. ignoring security is exactly the same as this and until people start taking precautions security will be a major threat in any operating system. even *NIX is vulnerable to user who don't care about security and don't follow the rules (yes i'm talking to all you idiots who still log in as root).
    like i said, those idiots won't change. they're as dumb as rocks. people just want stuff to work. I know it sucks but I can't change their views. but we need to tell microsoft to pick up the mess so we don't have to waste time telling people not to do certain stuff on the web. it's like with a macintosh. mac users are probably dumber than rocks but they don't have to worry about stuff because apple has actually taken the time to make a very stable, secure operating system.

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