Find the answer to your Linux question:
Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 48
Originally Posted by techieMoe Well, I have a different take on it. I disagree with your statement. None of the distributions you mentioned offer out-of-the-box support for major multimedia formats, ...
Enjoy an ad free experience by logging in. Not a member yet? Register.
  1. #11
    Linux Newbie stubbe's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    143

    Quote Originally Posted by techieMoe
    Well, I have a different take on it. I disagree with your statement. None of the distributions you mentioned offer out-of-the-box support for major multimedia formats, even if some of them offer the ability for download. What about those people who would like to try Linux but only have dialup, or no internet access at all? They wouldn't be able to use their computer for as many tasks as a person with only Windows XP. I see the need for a distro that offers this packaged in.
    humm, even windows which claimed to be very user friendly don't have some formats available right out of the box. They still need to download some more stuffs, like to watch DVDs on their PC.

    The main problem is I think the FOSS softwares seems too low profile. Both their promotional and simple stuffs like their website addresses. I stumbled to questions like what's the winamp replacement on Linux? Well, average linux user certainly know it's xmms. But newbies?

  2. #12
    Linux Guru techieMoe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    9,496
    Quote Originally Posted by stubbe
    humm, even windows which claimed to be very user friendly don't have some formats available right out of the box. They still need to download some more stuffs, like to watch DVDs on their PC.
    *gasp!* You mean, a Linux distribution is actually... EASIER than Windows? Surely you jest...


    I stumbled to questions like what's the winamp replacement on Linux? Well, average linux user certainly know it's xmms. But newbies?
    Freespire (and Linspire) sidestep that issue by creating lookalikes to other applications, such as iTunes (LSongs) and iPhoto (LPhoto).
    Registered Linux user #270181
    TechieMoe's Tech Rants

  3. #13
    Linux Newbie stubbe's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    143
    Quote Originally Posted by techieMoe
    *gasp!* You mean, a Linux distribution is actually... EASIER than Windows? Surely you jest...
    nope. never said that. But at some points that's true. What kind of OSes which gives full-blown, fully working softwares right out the box? When will you think microsoft will include MS Office along with Windows right out of the box?

    Sure, some difficulties occur, like you said about proprietary format thingy, but they can be solved easily and Windows users also bump into this kind of problem aswell.

    Can you really watch DVDs using a clean windows installation? Can you write or do spreadsheet works right usign a clean windows installation? It's a trade I think. You can't listen to MP3s on a clean Linux installation but you can do alot of other stuffs where you can't on a clean windows installation.

    The very base of this problem is familiarity, IMHO. 90% of computer users in the world uses Windows. When they switch to Linux, what they look for first are ALTERNATIVES, not how or what software that allow them to do office works, email, surf, etc.

    I don't think a born linux user who uses Linux for all his/her life would switch to windows that easily either.

    Freespire (and Linspire) sidestep that issue by creating lookalikes to other applications, such as iTunes (LSongs) and iPhoto (LPhoto).
    that depends on user's choice of softwares/distro. I can play MP3s without any problem using slax.

  4. $spacer_open
    $spacer_close
  5. #14
    Linux Guru techieMoe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    9,496
    Quote Originally Posted by stubbe
    nope. never said that. But at some points that's true. What kind of OSes which gives full-blown, fully working softwares right out the box? When will you think microsoft will include MS Office along with Windows right out of the box?
    Never, as long as they can make money selling it seperately. It doesn't even come with their Uber-OS Vista Ultimate.

    Sure, some difficulties occur, like you said about proprietary format thingy, but they can be solved easily and Windows users also bump into this kind of problem aswell.
    "Easily" is relative. For someone with limited or no internet (yes, quite a few of them do exist) most Linux distributions are useless because they require you to download packages to play industry standard closed-source formats. I've never had a MS Windows install that couldn't play MP3s out of the box, have you?

    Can you really watch DVDs using a clean windows installation? Can you write or do spreadsheet works right usign a clean windows installation? It's a trade I think. You can't listen to MP3s on a clean Linux installation but you can do alot of other stuffs where you can't on a clean windows installation.
    My point is it shouldn't have to be a trade-off. Linux users should be able to have everything work out of the box, not just the stuff Redmond doesn't provide.

    The very base of this problem is familiarity, IMHO. 90% of computer users in the world uses Windows. When they switch to Linux, what they look for first are ALTERNATIVES, not how or what software that allow them to do office works, email, surf, etc.
    And why is that a problem? Linspire/Freespire recognize that these people are 90% of the computer users in the world, and they're trying to make their transition to Linux easier.


    that depends on user's choice of softwares/distro. I can play MP3s without any problem using slax.
    How many first-time Linux users could use any Slackware derivative on the first try? How many would even know a distro like Slax exists? The vast majority of new Linux users hear about one of the Top 5 (Ubuntu, Fedora, SuSE, Mandriva, Xandros) and none of these save Xandros offers an out of the box multimedia experience.
    Registered Linux user #270181
    TechieMoe's Tech Rants

  6. #15
    Linux Enthusiast carlosponti's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Oklahoma
    Posts
    560
    people say windows is easier but it isnt always that way. when i install windows i have to install drivers for every freaking thing on my PC.

    Slax can be daunting for a new user for some things like putting modules on the disk. i would say mepis would be a good simple start.

    Most distros i dont think its about legality but principle when it comes to proprietary software.
    Blog
    Registered Linux user 396557

  7. #16
    Linux Guru techieMoe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    9,496
    Quote Originally Posted by carlosponti
    Most distros i dont think its about legality but principle when it comes to proprietary software.
    Which is all well and good, but I don't think most end-users really care about all that. They want an OS that works, and if the Linux distro they install doesn't let them do everything they want (i.e. everything they could do in Windows, within reason) then it doesn't work, and they're going to run back to their comfort zone secure in the knowledge that Linux "isn't ready" for their desktop.
    Registered Linux user #270181
    TechieMoe's Tech Rants

  8. #17
    Linux Newbie easuter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Portugal
    Posts
    194
    i'm not a linspire adept, but i applaud them for including all the extras like the multimedia support.

    i'm particularly disapointed at Novell for not including multimedia support in SUSE, even though they can afford it....
    All Empires rise and fall. The Microsoft Empire has already risen, only one way to go now...

  9. #18
    Linux Enthusiast carlosponti's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Oklahoma
    Posts
    560
    Quote Originally Posted by techieMoe
    Which is all well and good, but I don't think most end-users really care about all that. They want an OS that works, and if the Linux distro they install doesn't let them do everything they want (i.e. everything they could do in Windows, within reason) then it doesn't work, and they're going to run back to their comfort zone secure in the knowledge that Linux "isn't ready" for their desktop.
    my comment on the legality was actually a criticism. I feel that if there is not an open source version but a propietary version who cares if it gets included. gpl was nice in its time but its annoying at the same time. i know people that i talk to that are savvy with computers that will never try linux because they think it cant do everything windows will.
    Blog
    Registered Linux user 396557

  10. #19
    Linux Guru techieMoe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    9,496
    Quote Originally Posted by easuter
    i'm not a linspire adept, but i applaud them for including all the extras like the multimedia support.

    i'm particularly disapointed at Novell for not including multimedia support in SUSE, even though they can afford it....
    Agreed. It wouldn't take much for Novell to purchase client rights for MP3 playback at the least. Turbolinux even offers a licensed DVD playing application (as to Linspire although it costs extra).
    Registered Linux user #270181
    TechieMoe's Tech Rants

  11. #20
    Linux Newbie stubbe's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    143
    Quote Originally Posted by techieMoe
    Never, as long as they can make money selling it seperately. It doesn't even come with their Uber-OS Vista Ultimate.
    that's my point.

    "Easily" is relative. For someone with limited or no internet (yes, quite a few of them do exist) most Linux distributions are useless because they require you to download packages to play industry standard closed-source formats. I've never had a MS Windows install that couldn't play MP3s out of the box, have you?
    what makes you think anyone that poor that even they can't even afford the cheapest internet connection would bother themselves on their machines listening to MP3s?

    Most MP3s are also downloaded from the internet, or ripping their audio CD collections, so how can they listen to MP3s when they don't have any connections?

    As for ripping, ripped audio don't have to be in mp3 format and ripping tools are already provided within some of distros out there, but only those who have the curiosity attitude will find em. Even when they find this kind of tool, they need some more time to learn using it. This is where the very weakness of Linux IMHO.

    My point is it shouldn't have to be a trade-off. Linux users should be able to have everything work out of the box, not just the stuff Redmond doesn't provide.
    Yes, I also do wish I can do something about 3D Studio Max scenes I did, but wouldn't that be too much?

    And why is that a problem? Linspire/Freespire recognize that these people are 90% of the computer users in the world, and they're trying to make their transition to Linux easier.
    Alot of other distros already try that.

    How many first-time Linux users could use any Slackware derivative on the first try? How many would even know a distro like Slax exists? The vast majority of new Linux users hear about one of the Top 5 (Ubuntu, Fedora, SuSE, Mandriva, Xandros) and none of these save Xandros offers an out of the box multimedia experience.
    True, so the same question applies, how many first time linux users will hear about freespire when it's released?

Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •