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Originally Posted by The Flavored Coffee Guy Funny, it's an online puzzle, not an application. Free, isn't spam, and an example is what you really need. But then, I'm starting ...
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  1. #21
    Linux Guru techieMoe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Flavored Coffee Guy
    Funny, it's an online puzzle, not an application. Free, isn't spam, and an example is what you really need.

    But then, I'm starting to believe that most of you making comments, aren't even programmers.
    I write criminal justice software in Java and C++ for a living, and I have a degree in Computer Science, emphasis in programming. I still don't understand the point to your thread.
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  2. #22
    Linux Enthusiast carlosponti's Avatar
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    I am a programmer in a language called Powerbuilder with experience in oracle SQL and PL/SQL. I am trying to develope a skill set soon in .Net C#. I have an Associates in Computer Science. I still agree with moe
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  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Flavored Coffee Guy
    Funny, it's an online puzzle, not an application. Free, isn't spam, and an example is what you really need.

    But then, I'm starting to believe that most of you making comments, aren't even programmers.
    I code in python, html, css, learning C, and know some javascript, so, I am a programmer

    You can't exactly say it didn't look like spam, brand new to the forums, linking an app/puzzle (who cares, sameish thing) and when asked not to be so long winded, writes another few paragraphs.

    Anyways, nice to see you in the forums, welcome

    Edit: Also, just because some people do not program doesn't mean they are inferior

  4. #24
    Linux Guru Cabhan's Avatar
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    Hi. I'm a CS major, with 4 years of real programming experience (mostly Java and Perl (I've interned at NIH writing Perl for the Computational Biology Branch), and I've recently picked up C and C++).

    And it doesn't really matter if you are a programmer or not: ANY user, if he behaves intelligently, is virtually safe from any sort of attack. I managed to use Windows for 2 years without suffering a single spyware/adware/virus attack, and I did that without writing any special software.

  5. #25
    Banned CodeRoot's Avatar
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    The Flavored Coffee Guy:

    I actually understand what you are saying, but I don't believe it to be a viable, reliable, practical, means of achieving security. It may provide a certain measure of encryption, but it cannot provide a sufficient measure of security to make it worthwhile as a good long-term solution. IMO, the system overhead and risk factors outweigh the benefit.

    The focus of security is access.

    Achieve secure access, and you don't need anything else.

    If you can't achieve secure access, nothing else is really sufficient...

    Of course, you are at liberty to take a copy of your favorite distro and design your own "encrypted filename" version...

    Have you thought about pitching this to Bill Gates?

    BTW, I am a programmer...

  6. #26
    Just Joined! The Flavored Coffee Guy's Avatar
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    Most of us, are by no means programmers. Second, being that you are a programmer, then you know there is money in security. You also know that as long as you machine recognizes it's files, that it doesn't matter if the filenames are encrypted, as long as they look the same on screen for you to manage. But, if you ever studied viruses, they are dependant on common files, common file folders, and common drivers to work. Now, when you look at your TCP/IP socket, that should never see sending drive information. If Java can read your drive, you already have a security problem, the depth and detail are all in question, but whenever you click on a link and see your own files, you are at serious risk. If you know machine language, then you know it's still possible to read what's the drive. So, what is there should be encrypted. Not the files themselves, just the names of files and folders in such a manner that if directly viewed without a file handling utility to decrypt the file names and file folders, then you've given them a problem that will include the requirement for them to download every file, or read deeper into it, and find the headers. So, destroying extensions, and naming conventions that don't or won't get renamed to follow those conventions to view or be run from memory, will prevent automated navigation of your machine. A list of all of the files, still will not include the function, drivers, or any details of those files. They would be forced to literally download your entire drive before they could actually find anything. If quired, the information is read straight from the drive from most automated java, perl, or cgi program. How valid will you allow that information they recieve to be?

    As a programmer, an option is always masking the drive from the TCP/IP connection. To do that, you have to find thier commands that are sent over the net to thier software, and find the recognizable drive path information and delete on it's way out, or give them garbage. Instead of keeping a huge list of viruses to worry about, encrypt the drive's files and directory names.

    Quote Originally Posted by Cabhan
    Hi. I'm a CS major, with 4 years of real programming experience (mostly Java and Perl (I've interned at NIH writing Perl for the Computational Biology Branch), and I've recently picked up C and C++).

    And it doesn't really matter if you are a programmer or not: ANY user, if he behaves intelligently, is virtually safe from any sort of attack. I managed to use Windows for 2 years without suffering a single spyware/adware/virus attack, and I did that without writing any special software.

  7. #27
    Just Joined! The Flavored Coffee Guy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CodeRoot
    The Flavored Coffee Guy:

    I actually understand what you are saying, but I don't believe it to be a viable, reliable, practical, means of achieving security. It may provide a certain measure of encryption, but it cannot provide a sufficient measure of security to make it worthwhile as a good long-term solution. IMO, the system overhead and risk factors outweigh the benefit.

    The focus of security is access.

    Achieve secure access, and you don't need anything else.

    If you can't achieve secure access, nothing else is really sufficient...

    Of course, you are at liberty to take a copy of your favorite distro and design your own "encrypted filename" version...

    Have you thought about pitching this to Bill Gates?

    BTW, I am a programmer...
    Yes, I have. But, Microsoft took out the INI file system, and replaced it with the Registry File System. Now, the INI is the Registry file, and they quit encrypting it. It's readable now. Part was finished, the part that was intended to recover the ini files. Windows 95, had both. Now, Microsoft doesn't have a Make a Microsoft Wish, submission form, and they wanted to have people fillout and sign releases then use snail mail to present them. Too much trouble. They've never managed the whole disk that way, but that was the same idea, and they've shot it all down making it readable when they removed the ini files. Yea, that kind of encryption is a pain to work with, and that's why you should be using a floppy disk, or a spare thumb drive to test it on. The risk to the system is only as risky, as the software.

    Write this file first:

    {fourty RandomCharacters written to drive}, Original File Name and Extension
    {fourty RandomCharacters written to drive}, Original File Name and Extension
    {fourty RandomCharacters written to drive}, Original File Name and Extension
    {fourty RandomCharacters written to drive}, Original File Name and Extension
    {fourty RandomCharacters written to drive}, Original File Name and Extension
    {fourty RandomCharacters written to drive}, Original File Name and Extension
    {fourty RandomCharacters written to drive}, Original File Name and Extension
    {fourty RandomCharacters written to drive}, Original File Name and Extension
    {fourty RandomCharacters written to drive}, Original File Name and Extension
    {fourty RandomCharacters written to drive}, Original File Name and Extension
    {fourty RandomCharacters written to drive}, Original File Name and Extension

    Then write the fourty characters to replace the Original File Name and Extension.

    When you load it, replace it with the right file name.

    Since, this is all open source, remove the exension handling system, and replace it with a response to this list. Send data from one to the other.

    Here's the list of biggest risk factors:
    Common File Extensions

    Common File Structures and Directories

  8. #28
    Linux User Kojak's Avatar
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    My list of the biggest risk factors (in no particular order):

    - stupid users
    - stupid users
    - stupid users
    - stupid users
    - stupid users
    - stupid users

    :P
    Windows free since 2002 | computing since 1984

  9. #29
    Linux Newbie GNOME_n00b's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kojak
    My list of the biggest risk factors (in no particular order):

    - stupid users
    - stupid users
    - stupid users
    - stupid users
    - stupid users
    - stupid users

    :P
    i agree. its possible to make windows quite secure, but it takes far more effort, awareness, and knowhow than the average person is capable of. that same level of security is present on linux by default with no or little effort by the user. the vast majority of malware infestations on ANY operating system is caused by the stupidity and/or naivity of the user.

  10. #30
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    Metinks

    oid sooner spend my time dubiously browzin the internet with Linux than wondering what XP is going to catch from doing it. Pity the ones that write this junk can't more usefully apply their considerable talents to doing project work in this community.

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