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Information Week posted an interesting article on their Web site titled "Greatest Software Ever Written." The author lists BSD 4.3 as the best piece of software ever written and specifically ...
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  1. #1
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    Interesting Article


    Information Week posted an interesting article on their Web site titled "Greatest Software Ever Written." The author lists BSD 4.3 as the best piece of software ever written and specifically mentioned Linus and the Linux spin off. It's a decent read for those who may be interested.

  2. #2
    Super Moderator devils casper's Avatar
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    hi gtmtnbiker98 !!!

    where is the link ?? or have to Google it ??

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    http://www.informationweek.com the article is on the front page.

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    Linux Guru techieMoe's Avatar
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    An interesting article indeed. I'm glad they qualified "greatest". They even did a followup as to why MS Windows wasn't included. Just because something is a commercial success doesn't make their definition of "great". I heartily agree.
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    Super Moderator devils casper's Avatar
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    well !! its really great..... found a lot interesting facts....

    <=== { casper } ===>
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    Linux User DThor's Avatar
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    I guess it helps people feel fuzzy about themselves. Qualifications aside, talking in such absolutes seems meaningless to me - it's like "what's your favourite movie". If you can answer it, then it only shows how limited your take on the genre is, that's all.

    I agree there's lots of interesting info in the article, though - a good read. I just don't buy the provocative premise.

    A great BBC series that played a few decades back was Connections, created and hosted by James Burke. They covered these fascinating connections between what seemed like a simple technological concept and ended in phenomonally profound events. For example, one of the most chilling and fascinating shows started with Parisian loom makers back in the 1700's finding ways to automate weaving that led directly to the Babbage engine, computers, and eventually Burke sitting in the bomb bay of the Enola Gay, the plane that dropped the first atomic bomb. Brrr.

    Anyway, sorry for the sidebar, but it shows that you can take the "greatest" or "most influential" concept in any direction, really.

    DT

  8. #7
    Linux Enthusiast carlosponti's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DThor
    I guess it helps people feel fuzzy about themselves. Qualifications aside, talking in such absolutes seems meaningless to me - it's like "what's your favourite movie". If you can answer it, then it only shows how limited your take on the genre is, that's all.

    I agree there's lots of interesting info in the article, though - a good read. I just don't buy the provocative premise.

    A great BBC series that played a few decades back was Connections, created and hosted by James Burke. They covered these fascinating connections between what seemed like a simple technological concept and ended in phenomonally profound events. For example, one of the most chilling and fascinating shows started with Parisian loom makers back in the 1700's finding ways to automate weaving that led directly to the Babbage engine, computers, and eventually Burke sitting in the bomb bay of the Enola Gay, the plane that dropped the first atomic bomb. Brrr.

    Anyway, sorry for the sidebar, but it shows that you can take the "greatest" or "most influential" concept in any direction, really.

    DT
    i remember seeing that show. PBS or some educational station replayed those episodes here. that was truly an awesome show. i was fascinated from the start to the end of the show.
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