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ADDING EXTRA RESOLUTIONS FOR XORG So here it is, a tutorial written for total noobs to increase their resolution. WARNING: This tutorial is not tested, don't use it until further ...
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  1. #1
    Linux Guru Juan Pablo's Avatar
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    My first linux tutorial


    ADDING EXTRA RESOLUTIONS FOR XORG


    So here it is, a tutorial written for total noobs to increase their resolution.

    WARNING: This tutorial is not tested, don't use it until further notice

    DISCLAIMER: This tutorial is supposed to be helpful but I don't warranty it will work. I am not responsible on any profit loss,data loss , hardware malfunction, damaged hardware (video cards, monitors or any other type of hardware involver either directly or indirectly in this tutorial), unusable computer or any damage when using this tutorial.



    Preparing your system:
    Ubuntu: no preparation, if you have problems opening the file do "sudo apt-get install nano" either on GNOME-Terminal or Konsole
    SuSE: use pico instead of nano.
    Debian: use nano
    Fedora: use pico

    "Somebody help me to add for other distros"

    1.- Get to a console

    Press at the same time CTRL-ALT-F1 and login with your user name


    2.- Get root access

    Type “su" and when prompted type the root password, again you won't see what you type, if you are using Ubuntu skip this step and use the command “sudo” (explained later for each command)

    3.- Shutdown the graphical interface

    Fedora and similar: type "init 3"
    Debian: /etc/init.d/gdm stop
    Ubuntu: sudo /etc/init.d/gdm stop (use your own password)

    4.- Open the configuration file

    “nano /etc/X11/xorg.conf” on Ubuntu "sudo nano /etc/X11/xorg.conf" (use your own password)

    if it says “command not found” type

    “pico /etc/X11/xorg.conf . on Ubuntu "sudo nano /etc/X11/xorg.conf" (use your own password)

    If you are using an old distro you may type

    “nano /etc/X11/XF86Config” (use your own password)
    or
    “pico /etc/X11/XF86Config” (use your own password)

    4.- Edit the file

    Scroll down to a section that looks like this

    Section "Screen"
    Identifier "Default Screen"
    Device "Generic Video Card"
    Monitor "Generic Monitor"
    DefaultDepth 24 <=== Change to your desired depth here
    SubSection "Display"
    Depth 1
    Modes "1280x1024" "1024x768" "800x600" "640x480"
    EndSubSection
    SubSection "Display"
    Depth 4
    Modes "1280x1024" "1024x768" "800x600" "640x480"
    EndSubSection
    SubSection "Display"
    Depth 8
    Modes "1280x1024" "1024x768" "800x600" "640x480"
    EndSubSection
    SubSection "Display"
    Depth 15
    Modes "1280x1024" "1024x768" "800x600" "640x480"
    EndSubSection
    SubSection "Display"
    Depth 16
    Modes "1280x1024" "1024x768" "800x600" "640x480"
    EndSubSection
    SubSection "Display"
    Depth 24
    Modes "1280x1024" "1024x768" "800x600" "640x480"
    EndSubSection
    EndSection


    If you want for example 1440x900 at depth 24 you would change:

    ................
    SubSection "Display"
    Depth 24
    Modes "1280x1024" "1024x768" "800x600" "640x480"
    ................

    to ...

    SubSection "Display"
    Depth 24
    Modes "1440x900" "1024x768" "800x600" "640x480"



    And so, just be sure to add your desired resolution first and to follow your monitor manual so you wont have any problem.

    Note: Note that 24 bit mode in Linux is 32 bit in windows and so.

    Some monitors require the resolution to be equivalent to the refresh rate

    Go here:

    Section "Monitor"
    Identifier "Generic Monitor"
    HorizSync 28.0 - 64.0
    VertRefresh 43.0 - 60.0
    Option "DPMS"
    EndSection

    And change HorizSync and VertRefresh to the ones in your monitor manual. You can NOT add something like 80 hz here!

    Using wrong bad refresh rates can DAMAGE YOUR MONITOR PERMANENTLY!!


    Once you finish editing press CTRL-O (the letter, not a zero) and hit enter




    I hope somebody can take a look to it and help me to correct errors.

    Thanks!

    I am not sure about the disclaimer If somebody can direct me to the typical disclaimer you see everywhere ...
    Put your hand in an oven for a minute and it will be like an hour, sit beside a beautiful woman for an hour and it will be like a minute, that is relativity. --Albert Einstein
    Linux User #425940

    Don't PM me with questions, instead post in the forums

  2. #2
    Linux User Kojak's Avatar
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    Out of boredom, here are my comments.

    1. The first sentence must make clear what this howto is about. You put it at the end. Wrong place. Place it at the top of the thread.

    2. You assume that it is "wise" to run the X server while changing the files. This is imho not such a good idea. Propose to boot the system in init 3 mode (on e.g. RedHat based distros or init 1 in Debian). There people should work with the command line.

    3. You assume that nano or pico are installed by default. This is sadly not the case. The only default editor that absolutely every distro has is vi. Thus, use vi for editing the file OR explain how to install nano/pico (which are way easier to use than vi).

    4. You talk about "sudo" being explained later. The explanation is still missing.

    5. Explain how people save and exit from the editor once they changed the file and how they test the setting (-> e.g. startx command)

    6. Maybe you shoudl explain that the 32 bit colour mode that people know from windows is inreality the 24 bit mode we have in linux.

    7. Explain the monitor settings more in detail. Explain that entering and using e.g. bad refresh rates can destroy the monitor.

    8. Add a disclaimer that you cannot be held responsible for any damage done to the users hardware and that they will have to use it at their own risk. Otherwise you can run into BIIIIG trouble with some lawyers.
    Windows free since 2002 | computing since 1984

  3. #3
    Linux Guru Juan Pablo's Avatar
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    I will look this issues, and add a big warning about screen refresh rate and a nice disclaimer to protect me
    Put your hand in an oven for a minute and it will be like an hour, sit beside a beautiful woman for an hour and it will be like a minute, that is relativity. --Albert Einstein
    Linux User #425940

    Don't PM me with questions, instead post in the forums

  4. #4
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    Yes, you should have something in a large font at the beginning of the tutorial explaining what you are trying to do and what the purpose of this process is.

    I skimmed the tutorial and I still don't know what the hell the purpose is.

    Very confusing, to say the least...

  5. #5
    Linux Engineer psic's Avatar
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    I've seen cases where just adding the desired resolution didn't work, for instance, on a few laptops, getting the 1240 x 800 resolution ment first installing Ati drivers.

    Also, when you finish editing in nano, use ctrl-x. It asks if you wish to save and what to save as.

  6. #6
    Linux Enthusiast flipjargendy's Avatar
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    Put the disclamer for wrong frame rates damaging the monitor at the very top right after the explenation of the HowTo. Maybe leave it at the end as well. i may have missed it and may be at the top as well already. Sorry if i'm just blind.
    Running Linux Since 2001
    Registered Linux User #430868 - Since 91206

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